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A movement has long been in the works to raise the legal smoking age to 21. But this year, as The Dallas Morning News reports, advocates for the law may actually have the political backing to accomplish their mission.

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In response to the fracking boom, the Obama administration set forth regulations to limit fracking on public and tribal lands. The rules marked the administrations most concerted efforts to control the controversial method of extracting oil and gas. But those regulations have been challenged by oil-friendly states, and have been stalled in federal court for years.

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As Democratic lawmakers in Colorado push back against the GOP’s attempt to repeal Obamacare, some Coloradans who benefited from it are wondering what it will be replaced with.

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Perhaps there is nowhere as welcoming as an old farmhouse, so it’s only appropriate that a women’s drug and alcohol treatment center in western Kansas would be located in one.

As The Hutch News reports, City on A hill, an eight-bed residential treatment center, is located on a dirt road 15 miles west of Scott City.

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Immigrant advocates are formulating a plan to deal with if and when Donald Trump’s administration executes his deportation strategy.

According to The Guardian, one such resistance movement in Austin, Texas, centers on a reverend ready to create a physical barrier between undocumented immigrants and immigration enforcement agencies.

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Amarillo Mayor Paul Harpole announced Tuesday that he will not be seeking re-election.

In a press conference Tuesday, Harpole said he felt it was time he stepped down to allow for new leadership.

As The Amarillo Globe reports, Harpole made the announcement, which has been expected for several months, that he would not seek a fourth term in May’s election.

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When OPEC curbed production last year, oil producers on the High Plains saw a potential end to the slump that has crippled small-town communities in the Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles.

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On Friday, the Environmental Protection Agency denied $1.2 billion in claims stemming from a 2015 toxic wastewater spill in a creek that feeds a river in Colorado.

According to Reuters, farmers, ranchers, river-running raft companies and others filed the claims against the EPA, after the spill was accidentally triggered by the agency at the defunct Gold King Mine in southwestern Colorado, a spill that fouled waterways in three states.

Down times in farm country persist, but not yet a ‘crisis’

22 hours ago
Elliot Chapman

Farmers across the Midwest are trying to figure out how to get by at a time when expected prices for commodities from corn, to wheat, to cattle, to hogs mean they’ll be struggling just to break even.

“Prices are low, bins are full, and the dollar is strengthening as we speak and that’s just making the export thing a little more challenging,” says Paul Burgener of Platte Valley Bank in Scottsbluff, Nebraska.

Winter Storm Jupiter brings ice, snow to High Plains

22 hours ago
Angie Haflich / High Plains Public Radio

What was dubbed Ice Storm Jupiter continued to wreak havoc in much of the High Plains region most of the day Monday.

According to the National Weather Service, snowfall totaled anywhere from a trace to six inches in eastern Colorado, western Kansas and the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles.

Four to six inches of snow covered much of eastern Colorado and western Kansas; and the panhandles received from two to five inches.

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Winter storms cause outages on HPPR Network.

Several sites in the HPPR Network, such as KTOT, are down due to power outages caused by recent winter storms. Crews are working hard to restore power and we hope to return to air as soon as possible.

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A long-running lawsuit accusing the Secret Service of discriminating against black agents appears to be coming to an end without a trial.

The Department of Homeland Security, the Secret Service and more than 100 agents have reached a settlement agreement, the department says. A court still needs to approve the settlement.

Artist Does 'Bear' Of A Job As A Painter

1 hour ago

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