Valerie Brown-Kuchera

I’m prefacing today’s sketch, “Fearful Symmetry,” with a couple of disclaimers.  First, I am an incredibly lucky person.  I understand that to be able to poke fun at minor everyday problems is a luxury few people are allowed.  And second, in this episode, names have been changed to protect the asymmetrical. 

Luke Clayton

Luke's guest on today's show is Larry Weishuhn, aka. Mr. Whitetail.

Larry is host of Dallas Safari Club's TV show, "Trailing the Hunter's Moon" and a long-time authority on whitetail deer.

In today's show, Larry and Luke talk about whitetail fawn survival and the importance of leaving what appear to be abandoned fawns alone.

Memorial Day Gas Prices Highest Since 2014

May 25, 2018
CC0 Public Domain

People traveling over the holiday weekend across the High Plains can expect to pay the highest gas prices since 2014.

According to AAA, average gas prices jumped 12 cents in the past two weeks. Compared to an average of the past three Memorial Day weekends, gas prices are almost 50 cents higher.

The average price per gallon as of Friday was $2.74 in Kansas, $2.88 in Nebraska, $2.71 in Oklahoma, $2.90 in Colorado and $2.76 in Texas.

Public health experts in Texas are concerned that a growing number of American children are forgoing services like Medicaid and food stamps because their parents are undocumented. The trend could get worse, they say, if a proposed change to immigration policy goes through.  

SCOTUS Case Impacts Ag Workers

May 24, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

This week’s decision by the U.S. Supreme Court says employers can avoid settling disputes with workers in court.

But that could harm people who work on farms or in meatpacking plants … people who often rely on class-action lawsuits to collect unfairly withheld wages.

University of Denver law professor Nantiya Ruan says litigation is expensive and the damages in those types of cases are small, so ag workers usually can’t afford an individual case.

Creative Commons

While Kansas is often the topic of jokes – including its appearance in National Lampoon’s Vacation – the small Kansas town of Coolidge, near the Colorado state line, has become a popular stop for westward travelers.

As The Wichita Eagle reports, Coolidge is one of those towns you can drive through – on gravel roads in this case - in less than a minute. And in the National Lampoon movie, was painted as “Hickville, USA.”

Top Democrats in the Kansas House and Senate will request investigations into the use of no-bid state contracts, but the proposals will need the approval of some Republican lawmakers to advance.

The Kansas Department of Revenue used a no-bid process, called prior authorization, to award a multi-million dollar contract that outsourced some information technology services earlier this spring. 

Our Turn At This Earth: The Exploratory Impulse

May 24, 2018
Pexels

At age 12, my older brother Bruce knew more about the native plants in our pasture and the birds in our windbreak than I would learn by the time I was 30. I brought his wrath down on my head once for placing stamps of cardinals and woodpeckers, muskrats and badgers—crookedly, poorly torn, and in the wrong spaces—in his Junior Audubon Society booklet. But for the most part, I didn’t share my brother’s drive to understand the natural world.

Michael Stravato / The Texas Tribune

A low-key, low-turnout primary runoff election Tuesday set the slates for November's general elections — starting with the Democratic nominee for governor.

From The Texas Tribune:

Tuesday’s runoffs set the major party ballots for a November general election where Texas Republicans will be trying to maintain a 24-year winning streak in statewide elections while Democrats will be trying to breach the red seawall with a blue tsunami.

Marshall Expects Farm Bill To Pass House In June

May 24, 2018
marshall.house.gov

Kansas Republican Representative Roger Marshall says that despite the Farm Bill failing to pass in the House last week, he still expects it to pass. 

No Democrats voted for the bill, and the Freedom Caucus, a small group of conservative Republicans, also withdrew their support until after immigration is discussed.

Marshall is on the House Agriculture committee. He says there are no plans to win over Democrats by backtracking on stricter work requirements for federal food aid.

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When President Trump granted a posthumous pardon to legendary boxer Jack Johnson Thursday, he showed, once again, that he is willing to use his clemency authority in high-profile cases.

Why Ghana's Clam Farmers Are Digging GPS

31 minutes ago

Samuel-Richard Bogobley is wearing a bright orange life vest and leaning precariously over the edge of a fishing canoe on the Volta River estuary, a gorgeous wildlife refuge where Ghana's biggest river meets the Gulf of Guinea.

He's looking for a bamboo rod poking a couple feet above the surface. When he finds it, he holds out a computer tablet and taps the screen. Then he motions for the captain to move the boat forward as he scans the water for the next rod.

A love story between a black Army nurse and a white German POW during World War II? You couldn't make that story up — and Alexis Clark didn't. The former editor at Town & Country is an adjunct professor at Columbia University's School of Journalism. I spoke with her about her new book, Enemies in Love, and what she learned about hidden Army history and the human heart.

Below is an edited version of our conversation.


What was the inspiration for this book, what got you rolling?

For many, hiking into the humbling expanse of the Grand Canyon is a once-in-a-lifetime adventure. But for a hearty few, it's a commute.

At Phantom Ranch, the bunkhouse and restaurant on the canyon's floor, employees have been helping people feel at home for nearly a century.

It doesn't matter what day it is. Or even what year. Every evening down here, it's the same siren song: The dinner bell.

"Good evening, people of stew dinner!" bellowed P.J. O'Malley, a 30-something bearded guy, with a ponytail and a knack for engaging the eager crowd.