Allison Herrera / KOSU

The Trail of Tears is one of the most shameful and painful episodes in American history. But now, reports KOSU, the descendants of the original Trail’s travelers have found a poignant—and grueling—way to honor their ancestors. In the winter of 1838, 16,000 Cherokee Indians were marched at gunpoint from Georgia to Oklahoma. Their land was taken from them so that white settlers could develop the territory. 4,000 Cherokee died on the thousand-mile walk. In 1984, contemporary Cherokees began an annual bike ride over the original trail’s route.

kansas.com

A Kansas school has found a new approach to education that teachers say is resulting in more concentration among the kids, reports The Wichita Eagle. In fact, student behavior has improved and the overall atmosphere at the school has changed. What’s the secret? A program called Morning Mindfulness. It’s a half-hour of play therapy, yoga, coloring, crafts and other activities designed to calm children and help them focus before study begins.

Business is booming in Colorado, reports The Prowers Journal. According to a new report, in the first three months of the year business formation has rebounded. Colorado employment is also projected to expand over the next two quarters. The news was a welcome relief after two consecutive quarters of business decline.

Texas Tribune

In Texas, all state agencies must win legislative permission every 12 years to remain open. But who decides if these agencies stay alive? The task is handled by what’s known as the Sunset Advisory Commission, reports The Texas Tribune. It’s the commission’s job to periodically recommend changes in how agencies operate.

Daffodils and Poetry

14 hours ago
bay.ifas.ufl.edu

 Plants and poetry are frequent partners, and perhaps no combination of the literary and the horticultural is better known that Wordsworth and daffodils.  His love of the great outdoors prompted him to walk across England and then all of Europe, during which time he penned his famous descriptive poem that begins,

"I wandered lonely as a cloud/That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd/A host, of golden daffodils."

This week we're exploring my fondness for daffodils, and the reasons they're perfect for growing on the High Plains.

Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

An Oklahoma legislator is drawing heat for remarks he made last week concerning African-Americans and Native Americans, reports member station KGOU. The statements by state Rep. Todd Russ, a Republican of Cordell, came during house debate about the state’s new alcohol laws. Russ opposes the laws, which would allow wine and strong beer sales in grocery and convenience stores. During the debates, Russ said Native Americans are “predisposed to alcoholism.”

State of Arkansas

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on Thursday signed an appropriation bill into law and used a line-item veto to ensure continuation of the state’s Medicaid expansion, ending a two-week budget standoff.

The Medicaid expansion covers more than 267,000 Arkansans who make less than 138 percent of the federal poverty level (annually about $16,000 for an individual or a little more than $33,000 for a family of four).

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

When Texas lawmakers leave office, they often have a sizable amount of money still sitting in their campaign war chests. What they choose to do with that money can vary widely, reports The Texas Tribune. For example, Sen. Kevin Eltife, who is not seeking re-election, had well over a million at the end of last year. And Rep.

The Ada News

This week marked the 83rd anniversary of the first White House performance by the Chickasaw storyteller Te Ata. Te Ata was a graduate of the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma, reports The Ada News. She performed at the first state dinner of Franklin Roosevelt’s presidency in 1933.

Shelby Knowles / Texas Tribune

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton says he does in deed plan to run for re-election in 2018. This came as a surprise to some observers, including The Texas Tribune. The Tea Party favorite is currently under multiple indictments.

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Improved reception for Dodge City

Listeners in Dodge City can now hear a stronger High Plains Public Radio signal by tuning to 91.9 FM. This new service is possible through a cooperative arrangement with the Dodge City Community College to use its station, KONQ-FM 91.9, to rebroadcasts HPPR's programming on weekdays from midnight to 9 am and all day Saturday. During others hours KONQ continues to broadcast its regular student and Spanish language programming. HPPR greatly appreciates the assistance of the Dodge City Community...
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