ABBIE FENTRESS SWANSON / HARVEST PUBLIC MEDIA

As the Trump administration takes the initial steps toward renegotiating one of the country’s most influential and controversial trade deals, groups that represent farmers and ranchers are already waving a caution sign.

Are you a good witch or a bad witch?

Today on High Plains Morning, we had Scott Stine live in the studio to talk about the Bad Magik Musik Fest that takes over Sam Houston Park this SATURDAY from noon to 9p. It's famliy-friendly, dog-welcoming, and features community-minded local vendors, artists, food, and fun.

President Trump made campaign promises to pull the U.S. out of big international trade deals and focus instead on one-on-one agreements with other countries. But that has farmers worried they will lose some of the $135 billion in goods they sold overseas last year.

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Yesterday HPPR looked at the balance of power among Republicans and Democrats in state legislatures across the High Plains. Today we thought we’d have a look at the tally when it comes to governorships and national officeholders in our listening region.

William Luther / San Antonio Express News

Unemployment numbers for April have been released, and Texas added over 30,000 new jobs on the month, reports the San Antonio Express-News.

That means the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate last month held steady at five percent. Meanwhile in Oklahoma, the rate remained unchanged at 4.3 percent, despite the Sooner State shedding 2,500 jobs last month. 

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The unemployment rate in Kansas dropped slightly as neighboring Colorado’s unemployment rate dropped to a record low last month.

According to the Wichita Eagle, preliminary estimates from the Kansas Department of Labor showed Kansas’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate dropped from 3.8 percent in March to 3.7 percent in April.

As Colorado Public Radio reports, after the reforms of the Affordable Care Act, Colorado’s uninsured rate dropped from 14.3 percent in 2013 to 6.7 percent in 2015 and about 500,000 people in the state gained health insurance coverage and about 400,000 people got covered through expanded eligibility of Medicaid.

Wheat ‘a dead man walking’ type crop?

23 hours ago
Louise Ehmke

The grain traders in Chicago are thinking that the damage to the Kansas wheat crop from the late-season blizzard and freezing temperatures …is only modest. After all, it’s standing up now and field after field looks like it has 70-bushel yield potential. But Jim Shroyer says, “They may have a bad surprise waiting for them.”

After a trip through west-central and southwest Kansas on May 9, Shroyer, K-State Extension wheat specialist emeritus, says much of the wheat he looked at does look great.

Kansas Memory, Kansas Historical Society

HPPR listeners thinking about the theme of this year’s book club--Borders and Becoming--need to keep in mind that borders change to meet the needs of those who live within them. Over the last two and a half centuries, the parameters of the United States changed repeatedly. A modern day description of the contiguous states would include Folksinger Woody Guthrie’s first stanza of “This Land Is Your Land.”

The Kansas Senate Ways and Means Committee on Tuesday advanced a bill that would allow public health care facilities to continue to ban concealed guns.

A state law taking effect July 1 will allow people to carry concealed guns into any public building that is not secured by armed guards and metal detectors.

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HPPR is full of gratitude!

Living Room Concert: Nikki Talley & Jason Sharp

Nikki Talley & Jason Sharp ~ Sat., June 17th

Live @ Chalice Abbey, Amarillo ~ Doors @ 7p

2017 Living Room Concerts in Amarillo

NPR Headlines

Oil producers across the country are watching to see what OPEC does at its meeting in Vienna this week, since the cartel of oil-exporting countries has recently played a big role in turning around a two-year U.S. slump.

There are more than twice as many U.S. rigs drilling for oil as a year ago, a turnaround that's felt keenly in places like the Bakken oil patch in North Dakota. Cigarettes and chewing tobacco are flying off the shelves of the gas station Angela Neuman manages in the town of Williston.

There's a rich body of evidence that links chocolate to heart health.

Now comes a new study that finds people who consume small amounts of chocolate each week have a lower risk of developing atrial fibrillation, a heart condition characterized by a rapid or irregular heartbeat.

When President Trump's budget director, Mick Mulvaney, unveiled the administration's budget blueprint earlier this week, which calls for significant cuts to food stamps, he noted that the aim of the budget was to get people working.

"If you're on food stamps and you're able-bodied, we need you to go to work. If you're on disability insurance and you're not supposed to be — if you're not truly disabled, we need you to go back to work," Mulvaney said Tuesday.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Chelsea Beck/NPR

President Trump's Tweets, Annotated

President Trump tweets a lot. With tens of millions of followers on Twitter, Trump proposes policy, shares his latest actions and reacts to the news. But 140 characters rarely gives the full context. Here, we attempt to do just that for key tweets. Loading...

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