Abbie Fentress Swanson http://hppr.org en Padlock the milk! FDA’s push to safeguard the food supply http://hppr.org/post/padlock-milk-fda-s-push-safeguard-food-supply <p>Many of the food terrorism scenarios outlined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration involve liquid.</p><p>And there’s good reason for that. Mon, 17 Mar 2014 14:59:29 +0000 Abbie Fentress Swanson 29200 at http://hppr.org Padlock the milk! FDA’s push to safeguard the food supply Changing dairy industry leaves some in the dust http://hppr.org/post/changing-dairy-industry-leaves-some-dust <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The growth of the dairy industry across the High Plains has been a boon to the economy and communities of the region.&nbsp; Urbanization and increasing regulation in states such as California are often cited as the reason for the migration of large dairies to our area.&nbsp; But there’s also on overall industry consolidation underway that’s driving out small producers from nearby states, including dairyman Donnie Davidson and others in Missouri, as profiled in this story from Harvest Public Media.</span></p><p align="center">~~~~~~</p><p>Donnie Davidson’s family has been producing bottled milk in Holden, Mo., since the 1930s. But the 63-year-old farmer decided to sell his herd of 50 milking cows in November after the roof on one of his barns collapsed from last winter’s snow.</p><p> Wed, 12 Feb 2014 06:00:01 +0000 Abbie Fentress Swanson 27842 at http://hppr.org Changing dairy industry leaves some in the dust In A Small Missouri Town, Immigrants Turn To Schools For Help http://hppr.org/post/small-missouri-town-immigrants-turn-schools-help <em>This story comes to us from Harvest Public Media, a public radio reporting project that focuses on agriculture and food production issues.</em> <em>You can see more photos and hear more audio from the series </em><a href="http://harvestpublicmedia.org/content/shadows-slaughterhouse-dreams-own-words-immigrant" target="_blank">here</a>.<em> Wednesday, we'll have a story from a meatpacking plant in Garden City, Kan., which takes a proactive stance toward its newest immigrants.</em><p>For centuries, immigrants in search of a better life have been drawn to America's largest cities. Tue, 10 Dec 2013 20:33:00 +0000 Abbie Fentress Swanson 25398 at http://hppr.org In A Small Missouri Town, Immigrants Turn To Schools For Help Dreaming beyond the slaughterhouse http://hppr.org/post/dreaming-beyond-slaughterhouse <p></p><p>Not yet 9 a.m. on a warm fall day, freshmen Binh Hua and My Nguyen are in protective goggles, long hair pulled back, ready for their chemistry class in a Garden City Community College lab.</p><p>The teacher calls the class to order, calling the students “Busters,” short for “Broncbusters,” the college’s mascot and a reminder of this old West town’s history of raising cattle. Fri, 01 Nov 2013 05:01:27 +0000 Peggy Lowe & Abbie Fentress Swanson 23662 at http://hppr.org Dreaming beyond the slaughterhouse In the Shadows of the Slaughterhouse: Noel, MO Schools build safety net for immigrant children http://hppr.org/post/shadows-slaughterhouse-noel-mo-schools-build-safety-net-immigrant-children <p><strong>NOEL, MO</strong> - It’s almost 9 a.m., and Noel Primary School teacher Erin McPherson is helping a group of Spanish-speaking students complete English language exercises. But it’s tough going.</p><p>One student in a bright blue T-shirt – 9-year-old Isac Martinez – has not yet picked up his pencil. He’s clearly sick. When McPherson asks him what’s wrong, Isac’s small voice is barely audible in between coughs. He says he threw up four times last night but did not go to a doctor. Mon, 28 Oct 2013 15:15:13 +0000 Abbie Fentress Swanson 23526 at http://hppr.org In the Shadows of the Slaughterhouse: Noel, MO Schools build safety net for immigrant children Retiring to the farm anything but quiet http://hppr.org/post/retiring-farm-anything-quiet <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">It’s not just lifelong farmers who feel the pull of the land as they get older. For some Americans, retirement is an opportunity to begin the farming dream.</span></p><p>“I wanted to be able to be active and have a pastime that ensured physical activity,” said beginning farmer Tom Thomas, who at 65 still has the physical fitness to wrestle and brand steers at his son’s ranch in Oklahoma.&nbsp;</p><p>Thomas retired two years ago after teaching exercise physiology for 35 years and he knew what he wanted to do next.</p> Thu, 11 Jul 2013 05:01:00 +0000 Abbie Fentress Swanson 18617 at http://hppr.org Retiring to the farm anything but quiet What Is Farm Runoff Doing To The Water? Scientists Wade In http://hppr.org/post/what-farm-runoff-doing-water-scientists-wade America's hugely productive food system is one of its success stories. The nation will export a projected $139.5 billion in agricultural products this fiscal year alone. It's an industry that supports "more than 1 million jobs," according to Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.<p>But all that productivity has taken a toll on the environment, especially rivers and lakes: Agriculture is the nation's leading cause of impaired water quality, according to the <a href="http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/nps/outreach/point1.cfm">U.S. Fri, 05 Jul 2013 21:53:00 +0000 Abbie Fentress Swanson 18371 at http://hppr.org What Is Farm Runoff Doing To The Water? Scientists Wade In For Corn, Fickle Weather Makes For Uncertain Yields http://hppr.org/post/corn-fickle-weather-makes-uncertain-yields Last year's drought wreaked havoc on farmers' fields in much of the Midwest, cutting crop yields and forcing livestock producers to cull their herds. This spring, the rain that farmers needed so badly in 2012 has finally returned. But maybe too much, and at the wrong time.<p>It's almost the end of April, which is prime time to plant corn. Wed, 24 Apr 2013 07:25:00 +0000 Abbie Fentress Swanson 15100 at http://hppr.org For Corn, Fickle Weather Makes For Uncertain Yields A new frontier in genetically engineered food http://hppr.org/post/new-frontier-genetically-engineered-food <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Kevin Wells has been genetically engineering animals for 24 years.</span></p><p>“It’s sort of like a jigsaw puzzle,” said Wells recently as he walked through his lab at the University of Missouri - Columbia. “You take DNA apart and put it back together in different orders, different orientations.”</p> Wed, 03 Apr 2013 01:12:16 +0000 Abbie Fentress Swanson 14250 at http://hppr.org A new frontier in genetically engineered food Small Farmers Aren't Cashing In With Wal-Mart http://hppr.org/post/small-farmers-arent-cashing-wal-mart When Wal-Mart calls, Herman Farris always finds whatever the retailer wants, even if it's yucca root in the dead of winter. Farris is a produce broker in Columbia, Mo., who has been buying for Wal-Mart from auctions and farms since the company began carrying fruits and vegetables in the early 1990s.<p>During the summer and fall, nearly everything Farris delivers is grown in Missouri. That's Wal-Mart's definition of "local" — produce grown and sold in the same state. Mon, 04 Feb 2013 16:27:00 +0000 Abbie Fentress Swanson 11895 at http://hppr.org Small Farmers Aren't Cashing In With Wal-Mart Drought Hurts U.S. Grain Exporters, Market Share http://hppr.org/post/drought-hurts-us-grain-exporters Transcript <p>RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: <p>And now for today's business bottom line. Last summer's drought has brought bad news this fall - low crop yields, especially of corn; plus higher prices, and a prediction from the Department of Agriculture that corn exports will be at a 40-year low. The U.S. still is the world's biggest supplier of corn. But this year, American exporters won't be quite as dominant as usual, in the global corn market. Tue, 20 Nov 2012 10:23:00 +0000 Abbie Fentress Swanson 9094 at http://hppr.org Corn Belt Farmland: The Newest Real Estate Bubble? http://hppr.org/post/corn-belt-farmland-newest-real-estate-bubble Howard Audsley has been driving through Missouri for the past 30 years to assess the value of farmland. Barreling down the flat roads of Saline County on a recent day, he stopped his truck at a 160-acre tract of newly tilled black land. The land sold in February for $10,700<strong> </strong>per acre, double what it would have gone for five years ago.<p>Heading out into the field, Audsley picked up a clod of the dirt that makes this pocket of land some of the priciest in the state.<p>"This is a very loamy, very productive, but loamy soil," Audsley said. Thu, 08 Nov 2012 21:54:00 +0000 Abbie Fentress Swanson 8672 at http://hppr.org Corn Belt Farmland: The Newest Real Estate Bubble?