prairie conservation http://hppr.org en Prairie plants help restore farmland soil http://hppr.org/post/prairie-plants-help-restore-farmland-soil <p></p><p>The world’s soil is in trouble, even in the fertile Midwest. Some experts warn that if degradation continues unchecked, topsoil could be&nbsp;<a href="http://world.time.com/2012/12/14/what-if-the-worlds-soil-runs-out/">gone in 60 years</a>. That has implications for agriculture and the broader environment.</p> Thu, 25 Jul 2013 04:22:19 +0000 Amy Mayer 19282 at http://hppr.org Prairie plants help restore farmland soil Conservation Easements and Land Trust Organizations http://hppr.org/post/conservation-easements-and-land-trust-organizations <p></p><p>More than half of western Great Plains farmers are near retirement age. Many are considering conservation easements as a way of protecting the land from development and subdivision long after they're gone. The federal government, through USDA programs, negotiate easements on land meeting conservation requirements. Other organizations - Land Trusts - have been created specifically for contracting with landowners to quell future development rights to the land. This episode the functions of land trusts and what they're able to accomplish. This story is part one of a four-part series on Conservation Easements. It originally aired on HPPR April 16, 2013</p><p> Tue, 16 Apr 2013 05:01:00 +0000 Dale Bolton 14484 at http://hppr.org Conservation Easements and Land Trust Organizations The Benefits of Burning http://hppr.org/post/benefits-burning <p></p><p>Native Americans used fire to manage rangeland for thousands of years, but a 100-year burning hiatus followed settlement by Europeans of the North American heartland. Those decades of fire suppression allowed invasive plants to negatively alter the landscape. Tue, 27 Nov 2012 06:01:00 +0000 Dale Bolton 9142 at http://hppr.org The Benefits of Burning