community gardening http://hppr.org en Forget the golf course, build the subdivision around a farm http://hppr.org/post/forget-golf-course-build-subdivision-around-farm <p></p><p>For decades, housing developments in the suburbs have come complete with golf courses, tennis courts, strip malls and swimming pools. But make way for the new subdivision amenity: the specialty farm.</p><p>A new model for suburban development is springing up across the country that taps into the local food movement. Farms, complete with livestock, vegetables and fruit trees, are serving as a way to entice potential buyers to settle in a new subdivision.</p> Wed, 11 Dec 2013 06:00:59 +0000 Luke Runyon 25411 at http://hppr.org Forget the golf course, build the subdivision around a farm Beyond Community Gardens to Edible Parks http://hppr.org/post/beyond-community-gardens-edible-parks <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Community gardens dole out small plots of land and encourage people with limited access to fresh produce to grow their own. Now, there’s a new twist on that model springing up across the country: edible food forests.</span></p> Mon, 21 Oct 2013 05:32:27 +0000 Luke Runyon 23195 at http://hppr.org Beyond Community Gardens to Edible Parks The Tricky Business of Running a CSA http://hppr.org/post/tricky-business-running-csa <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Within the local food movement, the <a href="http://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/pubs/csa/csa.shtml" target="_blank"><strong>community supported agriculture</strong></a>, or CSA, model is praised. It’s considered one of the best ways to restore a connection to the foods we eat. Consumers buy a share of a farmer’s produce up front as a shareholder and then reap the rewards at harvest time. But as Harvest Public Media’s Luke Runyon reports running a CSA can bring some tricky business decisions.</span></p> Fri, 14 Jun 2013 03:27:13 +0000 Luke Runyon 17390 at http://hppr.org The Tricky Business of Running a CSA