News

Dan Dzurisin / Creative Commons

Caprock Canyons boasts a unique feature that can’t be found anywhere else in the world, reports The Canyon News. The herd of bison there is the last remaining true herd, genetically identical to the buffalo that roamed the plains before the animals were almost completely decimated at the end of the 19th century. The bison in the park are the direct descendants of the herd Charles Goodnight’s started in 1878.

http://healthimpactnews.com

The London Blitz involved nine months of German bomber-induced devastation that drove people who lived there into a state of constant awareness regarding the location of the nearest bomb shelter. While the banks of Big Creek won’t echo with the drone of mechanical motors and sound of carpet bombs exploding one right after another, one locale faces a dive bombing hawk intent on scoring a fresh chicken dinner.

Abbot Campaign Takes in Massive Nine-Day Haul

Jul 19, 2015
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Potential challengers to Governor Greg Abbot in the 2018 elections will be in for a fight, reports the Texas Tribune.  Last month, Abbot raised $8.3 million over a period of nine days.

In the first six months of this year, Abbot’s campaign has spent $2.5 million, leaving him with a war chest of almost $18 million dollars—a daunting sum for even the most well-heeled of opponents.

Bryan Thompson / Kansas Health Institute

From the Kansas Health Institute

A nonpartisan, nonprofit group of more than 500 retired generals and admirals see school nutrition as an important factor in military readiness.

Luke Clayton

 Howdy folks!

It seems hard to believe that I was just fishing for Northern Pike in the land of the midnight sun, and now I'm thousands of miles south with the grandsons on a fishing trip in Galveston Bay.  I'm fishing with the crew of Captain Mike Williams.  You might remember Mike, we went shark fishing with him last year.  He owns Galveston Fishing Guides.     

This is the closest salt water for most of us, and I tell you, if you could an opportunity, head on down to the bay and do some fishing... and take the family.  You'll be glad you did.

yogisden.us

Last week Alan Bates, of Tulsa, and family, "ventured out to the big skies of western Oklahoma" and came upon a Western-style pool party. He couldn't leave without snapping a few pictures. 

You can see more photos at Alan's blog.

TEXAS Outdoor Musical Celebrates 50th Season

Jul 16, 2015
Texas Panhandle Heritage Foundation

Robyn Ross of the Texas Observer has written a wonderful article on the 50th season of the outdoor musical TEXAS, performed each year in a 1,600-seat amphitheater in Palo Duro Canyon, southeast of Amarillo.

KHI News Service

From the Kansas Health Institute:

The three companies that administer KanCare have donated more than $50,000 to the campaigns of current Kansas legislators since the $3 billion Medicaid program began in 2013.

Sweet Annie

Jul 15, 2015
farmgirlfollies.com

 A favorite herb has responded to our recent rains and taken up an expanded residence at my place.  I welcome it with open arms and nasal passages, as its aromatic aura clears my head and provides fresh potpourri all around the house.  It's also a good keeper in the dried stage, filling in dried floral arrangements with lacy backgrounds that last well into the winter months.  Though it has a somewhat colorful past in the wormwood family, its gentle fronds and somewhat spicy scent are best known by it's common name of Sweet Annie.  

Creative Commons

President Obama visited Oklahoma on Wednesday, and stopped by Durant to speak to the Choctaw Nation about expanding economic opportunities, reports KFOR. The president gave a speech focusing on improving conditions for all kinds of American communities, including the Choctaw Nation.

Death and Dying: An Emerging Conversation

Jul 15, 2015
Bill Snead / KHI News Service

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Editor’s note: There is an emerging conversation about end-of-life issues and the policy changes needed to give people more control over what happens to them in their final days. This series of stories, and a video produced in partnership with Kansas City public television station KCPT, are about that conversation and the role that experts at two regional institutions are playing in it.

Historic Buildings in Amarillo to be Demolished

Jul 14, 2015
Amarillo Globe-News

A construction company in Amarillo has announced that it will be demolishing two historic structures this week, reports Amarillo.com. Sunbird Construction will tear down the Jackson Square Apartments, built in 1926 on the corner of South Jackson Street and Southwest 16th Avenue. The company will also destroy a home of approximately the same age to the south of the apartments.

Sean Sandefur / KMUW

Community newspapers throughout Kansas are switching to weekly editions, reports Wichita member station KMUW. Many of these newspapers, such as the McPherson News and Information, provide local residents with their only source for local news.

tgreybirds.com

This raptor migrates from its winter home in Argentina into western North America and breeds as far north as Canada. It's fate is tied to the amount of open rangeland left in the western prairie, and lots of habitat has been lost in the 20th Century after range land was broken out and farmed. The bird helps producers by eating insects, mammals and reptiles considered by producers to be pests. Conservation Reserve Program-enrolled land provides the type of habitat the bird can thrive in.

PARTICIPANTS:

Jonathan Baker

Novelist and essayist Jonathan Baker recently returned home to Canyon, Texas, after living in New York City. He was struck by the differences and unexpected similarities between the Big Apple and small-town West Texas. Baker published an essay about his observations in the magazine Colloquium, and he was surprised when the essay went viral.

Alex Proimos / Flickr Creative Commons

From the Kansas Health Institute:

This week’s announcement that the federal government is proposing Medicare reimbursements for doctors who discuss end-of-life plans with their patients was one Christian Sinclair has been waiting for.

Dingle Images

Somewhere I saw this quote, “Life is a journey, not a destination.” I agree and add you’ll meet interesting creatures along the way. Sometimes those new acquaintances look like something from an intergalactic space bar.

Rani Arbo and daisy mayhem have just released their 5th record together- ‘Violets Are Blue’.  The New England- based quartet are now in the 15th year together; 2 members were also previously together in Salamander Crossing.  The new record is full of their signature mix of folk, bluegrass, swing and blues.  We will listen to ‘Violets Are Blue’ this week on High Plains Morning.

Wheat Crop Stronger than Expected, Despite Hurdles

Jul 12, 2015
Tanner Colvin / Salina Journal

Kansas Agland reports that many farmers have been pleasantly surprised by this year’s wheat crop—especially considering that this year’s crop was subjected to just about every threat imaginable.

Stephanie Paige / Ogburn/KUNC

From Harvest Public Media:

Food companies the world over are paying close attention to the groundswell of support for food transparency, the “know where your food comes from” movement.

JBS, the largest meat producer in the world, is beginning to take notice as well.

Rodeo Bullfighters Aren’t Clowning Around

Jul 11, 2015
Brian Seifferlein / Harvest Public Media

From Harvest Public Media:

 

Rodeo season is getting into full swing and at most rodeos, bull riding is the main event. But when the bull ride ends, the work begins for rodeo bullfighters, and a young bullfighter is making a name in the business by putting himself in the middle of the action.

Phil Zimmerman

In last week’s column we visited about my recent five-day fishing trip with Cree River Lodge to the remote waters of northern Saskatchewan. This week, I’d like to recreate a typical day up there, if there is such a thing as “typical” in the most awesome part of the world.

Rick Perry Speaks Frankly on America's Race Problem

Jul 9, 2015
Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Last Thursday, Rick Perry spoke before the National Press Club in Washington and surprised many by his frank remarks on race, reports The Washington Post. He began by recounting the horrific lynching of Jesse Washington in Waco, Texas, in 1916, before going on to address America’s difficulties in grappling with its racist past.

Derrick Ho / The Oklahoman

In the late 19th century, with rigid prohibition laws enacted in Kansas, cattlemen flocked to the thin strip known as “No Man’s Land,” now the Oklahoma Panhandle. When the Santa Fe Railroad arrived in the 1880s, it brought with it droves of cowboys looking for liquor and women, and Beer City was born. Among the entrepreneurs who   came down from Liberal to serve the needs of these cowboys was Nell “Pussy Cat” Jones.

nsmn1.uh.edu

A trip to Northwest Kansas introduced my husband and me to a wildflower I hadn't seen before.  Our destination was the Smokey Valley Ranch, a working cattle ranch in Logan County.  Owned by the Kansas Nature Conservancy, the day-long visit began as a volunteer work session, as we helped remove invasive red cedars and clear old fence posts and barbed wire.  But it also turned into a wonderful learning experience as we observed the flora and fauna of the native shortgrass prairie that is protected there.

University of Denver

Civil rights for animals may be the next frontier in the struggle for rights, reports Colorado Public Radio. Justin Marceau is the University of Denver’s first full-time animal professor, and he has been working hard to fight the so-called “Ag-Gag” law in Idaho, which makes filming inside of farms and slaughterhouses illegal. The litigation supposedly targets “extremists” and “agriterrorists.” But Marceau argues that the law would, in fact, prevent whistleblowers from exposing abuses in farms and slaughterhouses. 

A Poet Explores Her Relationship to Horses

Jul 8, 2015
Laura Spencer / KCUR

Member station KCUR in Kansas City has reported the charming story of the poet Lisa Stewart, who has traveled thousands of miles on horseback over the past few decades. Her recent series of poems is called The Points of the Horse, in which she explores various parts of the horse, like the jaw or the flank, giving each its own poem. Stewart has ridden horses throughout the Rockies and the Midwest. In 2012 she rode 500 miles through Kansas and Missouri.

Creative Commons

News outlets have exhaustively reported the wide field of Republicans who are running for president in next year’s election. But those organizations are, in fact, underreporting the numbers, notes Mother Jones. In reality, 448 people from around the country have filed the form to run for president. Along with various other, smaller party affiliations there are 118 independents, 100 Republicans, and 74 Democrats who’ve thrown their hats into the ring—and that’s a lot of hats.

Creative Commons

Oklahoma may be one of the first states to repeal Common Core and draft completely new standards, Public Radio Tulsa reports.  Meanwhile, after repealing the Common Core goals, the state has instituted new academic standards in math and English, that in some ways go beyond Common core requirements. For example, elementary school students will be expected to write research papers, and high school students will need to know the “why”s behind mathematical formulas.

Alan Vernon

They're not sport birds, but they are important to the ecological balance of range land. We look at the lives and habitats of the birds, and how conservation initiatives like Conservation Reserve Program helps these species.

PARTICIPANTS:

Tammy VerCauteren
Executive Director
Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory
Ft. Collins, CO

Matthew Bain
Smokey Valley Ranch Project Coord.
The Nature Conservancy
Oakley, KS

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