News

Deadheading

Aug 27, 2014
agricultureguide.org

Today we'll learn about an ominous sounding chore that is a necessity for maintaining a perennial flower bed.  To some of our more mature listeners the title of today's show might recall Volkswagen vans packed with Greatful Dead fans touring the summer rock concert season.  But for the true garden buff, the term denotes a frequent summer chore of clipping spent blossoms in order to tidy up and control re-seeding.  It's a task that's never-ending but necessary.   

Huffington Post UK

Overuse of antipsychotic drugs in some Kansas nursing homes endangering patients
Powerful antipsychotic drugs are used too much and inappropriately to manage the behavior of elders with dementia in under-staffed care facilities, according to reporting by the Kansas Health Institute. Kansas ranks 47th worse for use of these drugs. The drugs carry serious side-effects, and reports say as many as 1 in 12 elders taking antipsychotics die from use of the drugs for dementia.

Jiyang Chen

Gabriel Medina: A southern gentleman from Houston, Texas.

And more.

He’s a young composer, working on his master’s from Juilliard.  His undergraduate work was in piano performance, and something inside wasn’t settled with that.  He knew himself well enough to recognize he didn’t enjoy the spotlight, but the creative process and composing.  He took composition classes which turned out to be the road to his calling.

Jiyang Chen

Taylor Hansen-Johnson is a dancer with the American Fusion: Into the Sun project coming to Kansas.  

Thinking back on our conversation, the words that come to mind in describing Taylor are: strong- of body, mind, and spirit.  She’s worked hard to get to the level she’s at in each area.   

Body.  Taylor wanted to dance since she was three.  Her mom started her in gymnastics, but Taylor kept insisting she wanted to dance.  Her mom was a dancer working at a studio in her hometown outside Columbus, Ohio.  That’s where Taylor began to dance, and she’s been dancing ever since.

USDA / NRCS

Over its 80-year history, the federal government's Farm Bill program refined soil, water and habitat conservation programs. Along the way, its strategy changed from "let's see how many we can sign up" to a more focused  "best bang for the buck" approach to conservation, spending funds on projects to conserve fragile landscapes.

Jiyang Chen

Jiyang Chen is the poster man for still waters run deep.  You ask him questions, and his answers are thoughtful and honest; even through his reservation, he is warm. 

Jiyang lived in China until he was eight, and he’ll say that his quietness is partly due to his culture. 

Jiyang’s father came to the United States to obtain his master’s degree.  He landed in Reno, Nevada.  He worked full-time as a chef and was a full-time student.  It wasn’t easy, but he did it.  The family followed him to Nevada.

Maria Im

Maria Im is boundless energy with eyes that send messages louder than words. 

She loves sharing her music.  She says when she plays, she’s holding out her hand inviting you to come and join the experience. 

Kristen Doering

If you could cross Tinker Bell with a pit bull, you would have Kristen Doering.  The Garden City, Kansas native is a willow on a mission.  Armed with an idea to bring New York art to Kansas in an innovative way, giving the artists and the audience opportunity to create relationships and share experiences was her goal. 

realworldsurvivor.com

 “Going once, twice, sold!” patters the auctioneer as he transfers ownership of an old wedding ring quilt to a buyer. The crowd moves in unison from the flatbed display wagon to let the woman who purchased the heirloom retrieve it. As soon as she moves back into place, the curious mass  realigns itself like a giant amoeba shifting and reforming. Many become one on a sunny prairie morning.

When headlines surfaced last week that Russia would block U.S. agricultural imports, the news seemed dire, or at the very least, unpredictable.

The day it was announced, markets reacted, with Agrimoney.com calling a surge in wheat prices the “Putin premium.”

Luke Clayton

Most readers of the outdoor press have read newspapers and magazine articles written by Bob Hood. Bob was a very active outdoors writer for close to half a century. He was one of my best friends and we hunted and fished together often and shared story ideas, pictures and the experiences of spending time together in the outdoors from the brush country of Mexico to the Rocky Mountains.

Adam Vos / HPPR

Stop by and say hi to us at the Tumbleweed Festival in Garden City this weekend as Western Swing and Other Things and Silver Rails broadcast live from the festival grounds, Saturday, August 23 from 10am to 3pm.

ali eminov/Flickr

Corn and soybean farmers expect a record harvest this year. And that’s after bringing in a record corn crop last year along with one of the largest soybean crops in history.

For once, farmers can thank the weather. It’s been an ideal growing season in much of the Corn Belt with just enough sun and rain to push yields to the limit.

http://threatsummary.forestthreats.org/

A relatively new tree disease has made its way to the northeastern plains of Colorado.  Thousand cankers has been confirmed in Fort Morgan.  It was likely transmitted to the community through infested wood according to a press release from Jennifer Dimas, Colorado State University Extension Office.

destination360.com

Kansas Chamber snubs seven Republicans in state House endorsements
The Kansas Chamber of Commerce announced candidates it's endorsing for Kansas House of Representatives in November, and some western Kansas Republicans are not included. Don Hineman of Dighton, J. Russell Jennings of Lakin, and John Doll of Garden City are among seven republicans not endorsed by the Chamber. All but one of the seven are running unopposed. In all of these races, the Kansas Chamber of Commerce opted not to endorse any candidate, according to reports by the Hutchinson News and Wichita Business Journal.

plantanswers.com

 Today we'll look at one of the most popular flowers in the garden, and one that is definitely easy to grow in the High Plains areas.  Once looked upon as a too tall and sometimes top heavy plant that sported pale colored blooms, phlox have been developed into various heights and some hot colors that will put some punch in your mid-summer perennial doldrums.     

Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Late summer in the Midwest is tomato season. For tomato growers around that country, it’s time to pick their bounty and calculate their earnings.

While sun and rain might be free, tomato farmers have to carefully weigh everything else they put in to growing their crop. Research and the development of new tools – from novel seed varieties resistant to diseases to additional fertilizers – has changed the input costs for growers.

kingarthurflour.com

Almost everything changes in 100 years, but some have lasting qualities able to stand the test of time.  Kanred was developed a century ago by Kansas State University, and now a direct descendent; KanMark has just been released according to the High Plains Journal

Lori Potter / Kearney Hub

When Denver physician and sportsman Kent Heyborne bought land in northeast Colorado, his intent was to leave it undeveloped as bird habitat.

akronnewsreporter.com

Rodney Meade was inducted into the Colorado County Music Hall of Fame this weekend in Boulder according to the Akron News-Reporter.

Courtesy Marji Guyler-Alaniz/FarmHer

In a living room converted to a theater for the evening, Ethan Peterson and Madeleine Russell portray the characters from Mary Swander’s play, “VANG.” In it, the actors share the emotional stories of four immigrant couples who farm in Iowa. Swander used transcriptions of conversations with Hmong, Mexican, Sudanese and Dutch farmers to create the play.

Outdoor America

Aug 17, 2014
rvgoddess.com

Any good outdoors person knows that Cabela’s is a necessary stop on any vacation destination within 200 miles of this famed outdoor shopper’s paradise.  As lovers of nature, my husband and I always squeeze in a shopping expedition on our way to or/and from Wyoming.  We would always wonder what we missed if we ever drove past that green roofed utopia on I-80.

Luke Clayton

Folks, this week, I'm hunting for Axis deer in the beautiful Texas Hill Country.  Back in the 1930's, Axis deer were stocked on ranches in the Hill Country and parts of South Texas.  Today, there are thousands of Axis roaming the region.

I used a .45 caliber big bore air rifle on a hunt for free ranging deer just outside a small town near San Antonio.  

As most of you know, I put my game meats to good use.  While recording this week's show, I was smoking a neck roast from the deer I harvested!

dodgeglobe.com

The board of Dodge City Community College has voted unanimously twice in four months to merge with Fort Hays State University to offer four-year programs.   Mirta Martin is the President of FHSU.  She recently attended a town hall meeting in Dodge City to dispel some concerns according to a recent article from the Hays Daily News.

Shelves have been pretty bare at Bella's Markets in both Limon and Stratton, but they should be full now.

khi.org

The Secretary of the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services says new federal labor rules may interfere with services that help disabled Kansans live in their own homes.  The concern is about overtime for workers who are hired and supervised by people with disabilities reported Bryan Thompson for Kansas Public Radio.

BPI plans to re-open its Garden City plant next week on a part time basis because of increased demand. The facility was closed in 2012 because of the "pink slime" controversy. It will re-hire 40-45 employees.

kaiserhealthnews.org

Kansas had 7% increase in Medicaid enrollment, also known as KanCare, between June of 2013 and 2014, despite the fact the state chose not to take advantage of federal funds to expand the program. The increase was also experienced by other states that did not expand Medicaid reported Bryan Lowry for The Wichita Eagle

Skip Delivers Bountiful Garden Basket

Aug 13, 2014

Each spring Skip Mancini, host of Growing on the High Plains, stops by HPPR's studio to help-out during the station's on-air membership campaign. While at the studio, she also holds a drawing, in which she'll  take off across the High Plains to hand-deliver one lucky listener a giant basket full of her garden's summer harvest. 

Pioneer Plant Finder

Aug 13, 2014
skreb.co.uk

Not all New World explorers discovered countries.  Some found new plants for the world to enjoy.  Today we'll look at a naturalist who helped record the floral finery of the gulf coast of Texas.  

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