Geography is “where it’s at”… and so much more!!

Debra and Lynn spotlight geography through GPS (Geography in Popular Song) to kick off Geography Awareness Week.

Join Debra and Lynn for a celebration of geography, in conjunction with Geography Awareness Week. It's all about songs about places, a Geo-trivia contest and prizes during Silver Rails, Saturday, November 14th at 1pm CST.

During this 2-hour special you'll hear a great folk music—in the geographic tradition-- from around the world, and get quizzed on your geography knowledge!  Grab your thinking cap, telephone and a computer, so you can call 1-800-678-7444 to answer questions and so you can identify the picture-quiz portion of the show, here on our website.

National Geographic World maps and inflatable globes will be provided for the quiz show winners and of course you'll also enjoy the bragging rights that come with being a geography quiz master!

Living rural means viewing stars without light clutter, neighbors helping neighbors in good times and bad, and signaling every driver you meet with a two-fingered wave. It also means shopping takes effort, and running a successful business takes even more. Despite difficulties, creative folks find ways to provide services others need. I could rave for pages telling why I like shopping local where I feel welcome and my commerce keeps money in the region. I love my small town bank, mechanic, stylist, grocery, drug, and hardware stores.

Real Men Cook

Nov 13, 2015

Both hosts of High Plains Outdoors, Larry and Luke, relish spending time in the wide, untamed spaces hunting and fishing, but for these two men, it's not simply about a successful hunt, it's about cooking what you bring into camp.

Colorado Health Co-Op Folds

Nov 13, 2015

Rick and Letha Heitman, of Centennial are customers of the cooperative Colorado HealthOP, which is folding.Credit John Daley / CPR NewsEdit | Remove

NPR Develops Podcast Recommendation Site

Nov 13, 2015

Over the past few years the popularity of podcasts has exploded. The term covers a wide range of programs, from interviews and journalism to comedy and storytelling. With the rise of smartphones, many people take their entertainment with them in their pocket these days. Podcast lovers—or those curious about the medium—have reason to rejoice this week, according to

Brandon Thibodeaux / New York Times

Texas wind farms are generating so much energy that some utilities are giving power away, reports the New York Times. TXU Energy is making a bold attempt to change the way Texans consume energy.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

From Harvest Public Media:

Cage-free eggs could be coming to a breakfast near you.

Several large food companies and restaurants, from Starbucks to McDonald’s to Kellogg’s, announced timelines this year for phasing out eggs laid in conventional cages, a victory for animal welfare advocates who have pushed for changes for years.

Widespread Panic / Browncat

Dave Schools - bassist and founding member of Widespread Panic - talked with Ryan Gottlieb about their new album Street Dogs, released on September 25th.

The rock, blues, and jazz band have been together and touring for nearly 30 years. Dave chats about recording the new album, playing with other talented musicians, and much more! 

Susie Fagan

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Three Republicans will not be returning to the House Health and Human Services Committee next year.

The reason: Their support for Medicaid expansion.

Website Ranks Health of Counties Across the US

Nov 12, 2015

The website has posted interactive maps showing the health rankings of every county in the US. Delving into the maps, HPPR made some interesting discoveries.

For example Randall County, which covers the southern part of Amarillo, is shown to be among the healthiest in Texas, ranking 27th in the state. But Potter County, which contains Northern Amarillo, is among the worst, ranking 209th out of almost 240 counties. Adjoining Carson County is slightly healthier that Randall, at number 26.

Kansas Appleseed Center for Law and Justice

When it comes to providing summer meals to low-income children, Kansas ranks among the worst states in the nation. In fact, only Oklahoma fares worse in feeding poor children during the summer, reports The Hutchinson News.

Environmental Group Pushes Support for New Biofuels

Nov 12, 2015
Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

From Harvest Public Media:

U.S. energy policy that effectively promotes corn ethanol is holding back a generation of more environmentally sound fuels according to a new report by the Environmental Working Group.

To grow corn for ethanol, farmers have been plowing up new land and fertilizing big crops. Some research says that means corn-based ethanol can have a larger carbon footprint than traditional fuel.

Texas Minority Home Ownership Lags Far Behind Whites

Nov 12, 2015
Jolie McCullough / U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 American Community Survey

Texas minorities are less likely than white Texans to own their homes, reports The Texas Tribune. The state’s largest metro areas have some of the most substantial racial disparities among homeowners in the nation, according to U.S. Census data.

Val d'Orcia

Nov 11, 2015

 A trip to Italy brought me to the beautiful Val d'Orcia in the hills of Tuscany, and more specifically to the gardens of Villa La Foce.  My tour focused on the house and grounds replete with terraces, fountains, and native landscapes, and also took in the surrounding farmland.  But one of the things that stayed with me most was the area's survival of the terrible battles fought during World War II.  The will to survive and maintain some semblance of order while providing care for others is surely mirrored in the solitude and majesty of the La Foce gardens.

Western Kansas Fossil Hunters to Appear on NOVA

Nov 11, 2015
Gwynn Williams

Chuck Bonner and Barbara Shelton have been collecting fossils in Western Kansas for years. They run a small gallery in a tiny limestone church 18 miles north of Scott City on US 83. But the number of people who have a chance to see their collection is about to grow—by about 52 million people.

David Morris / Creative Commons

The Center for Rural Affairs has long heard complaints from small- and mid-sized farms that the federal crop insurance program unfairly benefits large corporate farms and causes land values to rise. So the Center decided to investigate. Their research determined that subsidized crop insurance indeed has an impact on land values.

Kansas Biologist Takes Issue with Textbook Ag Science

Nov 11, 2015
Professor John Richard Schrock

For decades Americans have been asking whether it’s better for the earth if humans are herbivores, carnivores or somewhere on the omnivore spectrum? Some textbooks purport to have the answers, claiming to show in graphs and clear language that “herbivore” is by far the best route for humans and the planet. The textbooks insist that any land used for crops will increase the world’s food supply. But biologist John Richard Schrock disagrees, reports Kansas Public Radio.

In Oklahoma, the Battle Over Water Continues

Nov 11, 2015
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma’s battle over water continues to rage, reports StateImpact Oklahoma. In fact, water rights have dominated the recent legislative study discussion of the Oklahoma Farm Bureau.

Colorado State University Photography

From Harvest Public Media:

Close to 60,000 jobs are set to open up in agriculture, food and natural resource sectors each year for the next five years, according to a report from Purdue University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Tobacco Use in Oklahoma Is Declining

Nov 10, 2015
Pixabay / Creative Commons

The smoking rate among adults in Oklahoma has reached a new low, reports member station KGOU. According to a press release from the Oklahoma State Department of Health, the number of adult smokers dropped by almost 80,000 between 2013 and 2014. Over the last four years, the number of smokers in Oklahoma has declined by almost 20 percent.

Alex Smith / Heartland Health Monitor
Shane Torgerson / Wikimedia Commons

In regional news, new evidence suggests that use of the fertilizer ammonium nitrate has significantly dropped recently, reports StateImpact Texas. Ammonium nitrate provides plants with nitrogen so they can thrive. But the fertilizer can also be deadly when mixed with substances like diesel fuel. Timothy McVeigh used ammonium nitrate to blow up the federal building in Oklahoma City 20 years ago.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

The Migratory Bird/Duck Stamp is the best kept secret in bird conservation. Buying the annual stamp is a simple, direct way for people to contribute to wetland and grassland conservation. This episode presents seven reasons to buy a stamp.

Jacob Byk / Kansas Agland

From Kansas Agland:

The importance of farming and ranching to the state’s economy touches all Kansans – and, according to the latest Kansas Department of Agriculture figures – the world.

In its latest figures, the department states that agriculture’s annual output was about $62 billion in 2012 – the most recent figures available – accounting for 43 percent of the state’s total economy.

Earthquake Concerns Continue at Cushing, OK, Oil Hub

Nov 9, 2015
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Government and oil-industry officials continue to be concerned about the prospect of earthquakes near the massive Cushing oil hub in Oklahoma, reports StateImpact. A 4.5-magnitude earthquake was recorded near the hub on October 10. After an inspection, no damage was found. But the incident troubled authorities. The U.S.

Confederate Flag to Fly at Texas Veterans Day Parade

Nov 9, 2015
VANKUSO / Creative Commons

Veteran’s Day is this Wednesday the 11th, and as they have in years past, veterans will parade around the Texas State Capitol in Austin. And just like in years’ past, the Confederate Flag will make its appearance at the parade, reports Austin member station KUT. The symbol of the Confederacy will be seen at the parade despite attempts by Travis County Judge Sarah Eckhardt to ban the flag.

Texas Confronts Continuing Drought

Nov 9, 2015
StateImpact Texas

Texas is being forced to make some hard choices about its water use, reports StateImpact Texas. In 2011, Texas endured the worst single-year drought in its history. The current drought began in 2010.

StateImpact Texas has built an impressive interactive page on the drought, which you can view here.

Sharon Davis

I wait for deer season like a kid waits for Christmas.  November just doesn't come soon enough for me, and this season has me feeling a little melancholy.  I'm over 60, and when I think about my favorite deer hunts, the first one that comes to mind is a trip to North Dakota.  I didn't shoot a thing, but the outdoor experience was breathtaking.

Of course, Cindee couldn't let a show about recollections go by without reminding me one of her favorite deer hunting stories was when Larry Weishuhn and I locked ourselves into the deer stand.

One of my favorite features of winter is being able to see bird nests in leafless trees. I like to figure out what species lives in a particular area so I can look for it when days lengthen, temps warm, and foliage hides those cobbled together nurseries.

Creative Commons

From Kansas Agland's "Watchdog":

The Kansas Department of Agriculture is considering increasing fines for people ignoring the state’s mandate to report annually the volume of water they pump from wells or for exceeding limits on water use.

That’s a no-brainer. An even better stick would be to revoke their water rights altogether.