News

Colorado Ski Country USA, Jack Dempsey / AP photo/ CPR

Though it may seem like summer to most, in the mountains of Colorado it’s still winter. Two prominent Colorado resorts have extended their ski seasons well into June, reports Colorado Public Radio.

About 120 acres of terrain will be opened to skiers and snowboarders this weekend at Aspen Mountain. Aspen also offered bonus skiing on Memorial Day weekend.

Dave Hall / The Guardian

An editor for the British news site The Guardian recently went on a trek with a team of Oklahoma stormchasers. His expectations were low—he knew seeing a tornado was rare, even for these intrepid weather watchers.

Andrew Burton / Getty Images

Vox.com reported on an interesting paradox concerning the college admission process known as affirmative action. Since the program’s inception, white women have benefitted more than any other segment of the American population. Yet they are among its most fervent opponents. The irony lies in the fact that the program gained national attention when Abigail Fisher, a white woman from Texas, sued the University of Texas for not allowing her admittance.

Megg / Flickr Creative Commons

From Harvest Public Media:

Expansion in the country’s beef cattle herd is bringing cheaper meat prices to the grocery store just in time for the summer grilling season, but those reduced prices might get some scrutiny on Capitol Hill.

U.S. Department of Agriculture data show the price of ground beef is down about 30 cents per pound compared to last year.

USDA / Rural Blog

Many rural areas in America are becoming less reliant on agriculture and more oil and gas dependent, reports The Rural Blog. According to the USDA, over the last ten years the number of farming dependent counties in the US has dropped. In that same period, the number of mining-dependent counties grew by 60 percent.

Lindsey Bauman / Hutchinson News

From Harvest Public Media:

The blue bus is still going.

Once wheat harvest swings into operation around Lane County, probably by mid-June, the bus will rumble down dusty county roads.

In an earlier life it had been a school bus. But it was transformed long ago into a makeshift kitchen that often was filled with the sweet aroma of freshly baked oatmeal cookies.

bikeprairiespirit.com

Rural High Plains residents know the benefits of living in wide open spaces. But they’re also familiar with the drawbacks. One pitfall of rural living: It can be hard to access good places to exercise. Rural mothers rely on outdoor activities to promote health and well-being for their families, notes The Rural Blog. But they often struggle with the long distances they have to travel to find outdoor exercise resources.

David Zalubowski / AP photo

Pot profits are working to better the lives of Coloradans of all stripes. The third largest city in Colorado has announced that it will divert $1.5 million in marijuana tax income toward helping the homeless. The city of Aurora has now designated a number of groups to receive the funds, reports The Huffington Post.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

From Harvest Public Media

A weathered wooden shed that holds wheelbarrows, hoes and other basic tools is the beacon of the Student Organic Farm, a two-acre swath within the Iowa State University Horticulture Research Farm. On a warm spring evening, a half-dozen students gather here, put on work gloves and begin pulling up weeds from the perennial beds where chives, strawberries, rhubarb and sage are in various stages of growth.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

If Donald Trump is elected president, how will it affect the energy industry? The presumptive Republican nominee has said he wants to relax the rules on oil and gas drilling. He would also encourage energy development and cancel the recent multinational agreement to fight climate change. In addition, he says he would revive the Keystone XL pipeline and restore lost jobs in the coal mining industry.

woodlywonderworks / Flickr Creative Commons

After a stern editorial scolding from The New York Times last week regarding its staggering budget crisis, Oklahoma appeared in the pages of The Economist this week. The British publication noted that, 98% of Oklahomans support pay raises for public school teachers.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

The 21st century farm has come a long way from a simple matter of sowing and reaping. To keep up with the future, notes NetNebraska, many farmers are employing business school techniques. For example, David Muth of Ames, Iowa, breaks down his farm operation into individual one-acre datasets.

Sandra J. Milburn / AP photo

The largest electric utility in the state of Kansas has been sold, reports USA TODAY. In a deal worth almost $9 billion, Westar Energy will be acquired by Kansas City-based Great Plains Energy.

Keith Ivey / Creative Commons

Oklahoma residents who want to vote in the June 28th primary have until tomorrow to register. Friday the third is also the deadline to change your address before the statewide primary, notes News 9. Voter registration forms can be downloaded from the Oklahoma State Election Board's website. The URL can be found at www.ok.gov/elections

AP photo

Hillary Clinton has announced she thinks the Lone Star State could be in play this November for the Democrats, reports Politico. Her comments came in an interview with New York Magazine.

Luke Clayton

   In the 26 years that I have been writing this weekly outdoors column, I’ve come to learn thatmost of us that enjoy hunting and fishing also like to learn new ways to put the fruits of our outings to good use. We all have our special recipes and favorite ways to cook fish and game.

About six years ago, my friend Mike Pullen with Frisco Spices (www.friscospices.com) instructed me in the simple process of canning venison. Mike shipped me a jar of his Au Jus Base with instructions for making some of the tastiest canned venison imaginable.

whereintheusarv.blogspot.com

After months of wearing long pants, heavy sweaters over flannel shirts, and clunky shoes, folks are enjoying the chance to leave jackets behind and head to the park. It’s like a spring cleaning for the spirit as everyone goes down a slide, swings, or teeter totters in order to wipe away winter’s cobwebs and staleness.

The Vogts Sisters

Saturday, July 2
LIVE  in Garden City, KS

HPPR Studios ~ 210 N. 7th Street
Doors @ 6:30 pm | Show @ 7:00 pm

Please RSVP online, or call us at 806.367.9088!
Suggested Donation: $15
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Monkey Munches

Jun 1, 2016
leerichardsonzoo.org

I've been working for the past few month on a production to help raise money for the new Primate Center at the Lee Richardson Zoo in Garden City, Kansas.  It's given me an opportunity to talk with the keepers about what kinds of plants the animals need to provide both food and habitat.

Nicholas Benson / Wikimedia Commons

Floundering amid a devastating budget crisis, Oklahoma has turned to slashing higher education funding. State lawmakers have cut $67 million in higher ed funding from the current budget. And that comes on top of the $112 million that was cut last year, reports NewsOK.

Laura Buckman / Texas Tribune

Recent efforts to prevent suicide in Texas are focusing on the state’s small towns, reports The Texas Tribune. The Tribune recently analyzed Texas death records from 2004 to 2013. The paper found that the rate of suicide is 15 percent higher in counties with an urban population of less than 20,000 people than it is in more metropolitan counties.

Charlie Neibergall / AP photo

Rural America loves Donald Trump, according to The Rural Blog. In fact, if November’s election were only held in rural America, the Donald would win the presidency by a landslide. The US has traditionally had a divide between the political views of rural and urban voters. Urban residents have traditionally skewed farther to the left than their counterparts in the countryside. But this year, the gap appears to be eve wider than usual.

Sandy and Chuck Harris / Flickr Creative Commons

From Harvest Public Media:

Monarch butterflies are disappearing. Scientists agree that in the last 20 years, populations of the black and orange insect have been in precipitous decline. But there's much less certainty on what’s causing them to vanish.

KHI news service

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Budget cuts to the Kansas Water Office should not result in any layoffs but could delay some reservoir maintenance projects, the head of the office said this week.

Organic Trade Association

A new study shows that organic agriculture boosts local economies, reports The Rural Blog. The study looked at counties with high levels of organic agricultural activity. Researchers then looked at how these organic hotspots impact the local economies. The study discovered that being in an “organic hotspot” increased median household income by more than $2,000 a year. Organic farming was also found to lower a county's poverty rate.

v1ctor / Flickr Creative Commons

From the Kansas Health Institute:

A broad proposal by Medicare to change the way it pays for some drugs has drawn intense reaction and lobbying, with much of the debate centering on whether the plan gives too much power over drug prices to government regulators.

Juleann / Creative Commons

In regional news, Kansas is having trouble feeding itself. That’s deeply ironic, considering the state has long been seen as the nation’s breadbasket. A grassroots campaign is underway to prevent rural Kansans from going hungry. But state lawmakers aren’t doing much to solve the issue, reports The Hutchinson News.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

If you didn’t know better, you might think Western Oklahoma was in the midst of an aviation renaissance. Of late, there’s been a rush to register private airstrips in rural areas, reports StateImpact Oklahoma. But these new landing areas aren’t planning to attract travel. They were created to keep wind turbines out.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

From Harvest Public Media:

A group of Nebraska farmers is suing the giant seed and chemical company, Monsanto, in federal court saying the company’s top-selling herbicide gave them cancer.

Farmers Larry Domina, Robert Dickey, and Royce Janzen, along with farm agronomist Frank Pollard, have each been diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma, a type of blood cancer. They were exposed to Monsanto’s Roundup weedkiller in their work on the farm.

Callie Richmond / Bob Daemmrich / Pete Souz / Texas Tribune

The State of Texas has sued the Obama administration 40 times since the president took office in 2008. All told, the lawsuits have cost taxpayers over $5 million. So, The Texas Tribune wondered, what is the Lone Star State getting for its money? Texas has definitively won 15 percent of its cases, or six of them. The state has lost 10 of its challenges. And the state withdrew eight of the cases.

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