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Meclee / Wikimedia Commons

As The Dallas Morning News pointed out this week, it’s possible that a Trump administration could cause oil prices to drop even further.

Trump has indicated that, in his first 100 days, he’ll “absolutely 100 percent” approve plans for the Keystone XL pipeline from Canada to Texas. The problem with this plan is, it will only serve to introduce more crude into an already glutted world market.

Andipantz/Getty/Bloomberg / Animation: Sheryl Sulistiawan

American travelers may not have noticed, but a legendary American roadside icon has been fading away in recent years.

As Bloomberg reports, “(No) Vacancy” signs are vanishing from American highways.

These neon signs have been greeting road-weary travelers for generations--unless the “No” is lit before “Vacancy.” In that case, the sign has become a famous symbol of disappointment.

digitaltrends.com

With each year, the number of Americans who earn their living by freelancing increases. And as the number of people who work from home grows, so does the number of freelancers who are taking to the countryside.

According to an online study conducted for Upwork and the Freelancers Union freelancers now account for 35 percent of the American workforce. And of those, almost 20 percent choose to live a rural lifestyle.

Todd Wiseman/Lucas Jackson (Reuters)/Bob Daemmrich / Reuters/Texas Tribune

Some well-known Texans are being talked about for top posts in a Trump administration.

KWCH

Donald Trump has named Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach to his immigration transition team, KWCH reports.

Kobach said the job will take some of his time, but won’t take him away from home much. “I've got plenty to do here in Kansas,” he said.

Deviation56 / Wikimedia Commons

Last week, Colorado voters approved a measure to allow terminally ill residents to end their life peacefully if they choose to do so. Here, courtesy of The Denver Post, is what you need to know about the new law. Once the law takes effect, terminally ill Colorodans will be able to legally take a life-ending, doctor-prescribed sleep medication.

oilprice.com

High Plains oil producers received a tough blow this week, as oil prices fell once again on a persistent oversupply of worldwide crude. 

According to OilPrice.com, recent data suggests that the world will soon touch a milestone rate of oil consumption: 100 million barrels every day. In a normal world, increased demand would mean increased profits.

James Nimmo

Amid all the hullabaloo about the presidential election, some of last week’s state questions got lost in the shuffle.

Center for Rural Strategies

This week The Washington Post’s Wonkblog rolled up its sleeves and got to work trying to figure out why exactly rural voters are so angry. To get a new perspective, the Post talked to Kathy Cramer, author of The Politics of Resentment.

RJ Sangosti / The Denver Post

Ever since the George W. Bush administration, the nation’s schools have been governed by strict federal laws. Now High Plains educators are wondering what exactly Donald Trump’s election will mean for rural schools.

No one’s sure exactly, though as Chalkbeat reports, leaders hoping for more control over public schools may get their wish.

Amarillo voters approve two bond propositions

Nov 14, 2016
Getty Images

Amarillo voters approved two of seven capital improvement bond proposals in last week’s election.

Voters approved propositions to improve Amarillo streets and public safety.

Hot spot for hunting wild hogs in Texas

Nov 12, 2016
Photo by Luke Clayton

This week, Luke takes us to eastern Texas to hunt wild hogs.

Hunting guide Larry Large of Hunting East Texas talks about one of the best spots for hog hunting in the eastern part of the state, located about an hour east of Dallas, near Athens.

Why They Come Here

Nov 11, 2016
ANNE HOLT, Edina, Minnesota

Following is a provocative story shared by a reader.  On Sunday, November 13, 2016, HPPR Radio Readers Book Club will be discussing thoughts about immigrants and their stories.  We hope you'll join us.

From Anne --

I know. You want me to shut up. I love you, but I don't care.

On this day two years ago, I, along with some of the best human beings I know, visited a wall with nearly 30,000 names of human beings who were killed or disappeared in El Salvador during the 1980s. And it’s said to be an incomplete list.

Stehanie Mahe / Reuters

Wind farms appear to be killing many more bats than anyone previously realized, according to The Washington Post.

For years, scientists have been documenting the death of birds and bats in the spinning blades of turbines. But now it seems bats are dying at a higher rate than previously estimated.

Jen Reel / Texas Observer

Lost amid the red tidal wave that struck America on Tuesday was one salient data point: According to The Texas Observer, Texas was one of only four states to grow more blue compared with its 2012 vote tally.

With the exception of Fort Worth’s Tarrant County, all of Texas’s urban counties tilted Democratic this year. Texas’ biggest urban area, Houston’s Harris County, is now 70 percent non-white. Clinton won that county by 12 percentage points.

David Carson / St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If you find yourself out in the yard cleaning up Autumn leaves this week, you might consider putting down the rake.

George Frey / Getty Images

High Plains energy producers who oppose curbing greenhouse gases can rejoice this week, their candidate has won.

Reuters

Pundits and political scientists are still sifting through data can explain how Donald Trump surged to the most unexpected presidential victory in U.S. history.

ivn.us

This election season, we heard a lot of talk about how eliminating the Electoral College would make every American’s vote count. Often, this cry comes from more conservative circles of our political discourse.

But, as the Independent Voter Project notes, real thought went into the idea of the Electoral College. And the system gives rural voters far more of a voice than they would receive if it were abolished.

Agri-News

The federal government is investing $331 million in 85 projects to improve improve water and wastewater infrastructure in the rural U.S.

The Washington Post

Middle-aged white women—especially in rural areas—continue to die at a much faster rate than many other groups.

Kansas Flatlanders Militia / Kansas City Star

A Kansas Militia says it spurned members of the October plot to blow up an apartment complex in Garden City, Kansas.

Miles Evans, commander of the Kansas Flatlanders Militia, says he was contacted by two of the plotters, who wanted to join his group.

As The Kansas City Star reports, Evans met the two men at militia training events. The would-be bombers later contacted him through Facebook. Evans rejected the two men, calling them “too extreme.”

While home gardening has certainly seen a rich resurgence in recent years, planting food crops for the purposes of conserving and preserving dates back to a time of meager means.  

Today on Growing on the High Plains, I'll share some history and context regarding the American "victory garden." Self-sufficient citizens that planted and maintained food plots helped supplement shortages in a time of war. Nurturing fresh food for the troops (and the family table) provided a sense of service, pride, and community.  

Bettman & Halpin

Live in Amarillo: Friday, November 18th
Doors @ 7p ~ Show @ 7:30p
Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley St. ~ Off Georgia, Near Wolflin)
$15 Suggested Donation

Please let us know you're coming!
You can RSVP online, or call 806.367.9088.

WTAMU/amarillo.com

Colleges and universities on the High Plains are seeing increased enrollment in agricultural programs, reports Amarillo.com.

Rural Blog

In the first years of this century, the number of home-schooled children in America nearly doubled, according to a new report.

From 1999 to 2012 the number of students schooled at home jumped from 850,000 to almost one-and-a-quarter million.

Houses are bigger and cheaper in Gurley, Ala. than in big citiesCredit Art Meripol / The Wall Street JournalEdit | Remove

Rural citizens might want to keep an eye out for an influx of techies in the near future. Many urban tech companies are leaving the big city and setting out for parts unknown—and that could mean a tech future for the High Plains.

Getty Images

Big oil is investing big time in technologies to capture and store greenhouse gas emissions.

As Bloomberg reports, some of the world’s biggest oil companies are investing $1 billion to develop methods to improve energy efficiency. The investment is a joint effort from 10 of the world’s largest oil and gas companies, including Saudi Arabian Oil Co. and Royal Dutch Shell Plc. The companies hope to deploy low-carbon technologies on a large scale.

Vasily Fedosenko / Reuters/Quartz.com

Now that the election is over, we can get back to focusing on what’s important in the world. According to Quartz.com, there’s a new device available that allows cows to text message their farmers when they’re pregnant.

Kansas City Star

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has been delivered yet another defeat in court over his plan to prevent people from voting in state and local elections unless they show proof of U.S. citizenship.

As The Kansas City Star reports, a Shawnee County judge has permanently extended an earlier injunction against a two-tiered voter registration system backed by Kobach.

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