News

An irrigation system waters soybean plants in a field near Larned, as seen in this file photo from 2011.Credit Sandra J. Milburn / The Hutchinson NewsEdit | Remove

TOPEKA – Garden City Mayor Chris Law wasn’t in Topeka Tuesday, but he would have liked what was said.

Valarie Smith

A high school student in Garden City, Kansas has organized a rally for to show support for the southwest Kansas community’s diverse population in light of President Donald Trump’s executive orders last week to build a border wall on the Mexico border and the U.S travel ban for citizens of seven predominantly Muslim countries.

madabandon / Flickr Creative Commons

President Trump’s trade agenda may be on a collision course with the interests of his rural voters.

A recent Vox article suggested that starting trade wars with our allies would be “a disaster for American farmers.”

The irony lies in the fact that Trump was swept into power on the votes of rural Americans—farmers and ranchers who had grown frustrated with the amount of regulation enacted by Obama’s White House.

KGOU

Indian tribes in Oklahoma are seeking skilled doctors and chefs to work and serve in their rural communities.

KGOU reports that tribes in Oklahoma have struggled to compete with more urban areas for highly trained workers. The problem exists despite the fact that the tribes offer competitive salaries and other incentives.

When it comes to doctors, many tribes even offer to repay student loans, undergraduate and medical school loans, as well as offering scholarships.

Rebajae / Wikimedia Commons

The Dallas Morning News has written an appeal to President Trump, urging him not to cut off Texas’s economic contact with its neighbor to the south.

The editorial noted that Mexico is one of the key reasons the Lone Star State’s economy has been strong in recent years. And, the editors stated, threatening a trade war over the building of a border wall will hurt Texas more than any other state.

Creative Commons CC0

Military retirees in Colorado could enjoy a lot more financial security in the future if a tax relief bill heard at the statehouse today keeps moving forward.

As the Prowers Journal reports, Senate Bill 75, authored by Senator Larry Crowder, R-Alamosa, eliminates current caps on how much military retirees are able to deduct from federal taxable income.

Better Business Bureau warns of new phone scam

Feb 2, 2017
Creative Commons CC0

If a telemarketer calls and asks, ‘Can you hear me,’ either hang up or avoiding saying ‘yes’ because the caller may record the response and use it to sign you up for unwanted services or products.

Kansas Geological Survey

Some of Kansas’s lesser known wonders are being featured on the Smithsonian Channel's 'Aerial America.’

One of those wonders is the chalk towers in western Kansas, featured in a four-minute video on the Smithsonian Channel's website, which describes how they were formed.

According to the video, the badlands, located in Gove County, were under a vast, inland sea where billions of creatures lived, died and left their bodies on the ocean floor in ancient layers of chalk.

To some people, a plant is a plant is a plant. But to the phytophilous (or plant-loving) High Plains gardener, identifying our native flora can often be as fun as tending their beds.

Today's installment of Growing on the High Plains compares two competing conventions.

First, we'll discuss the often-complex botanical naming system used to identify various species of plants. (Sometimes, it's all Latin to me.)

Next, I'll share a few of the delightful "common names" often used as shorthand when describing three of my favorite house plants.

Feed & Grain

Many in the ag sector were cheered by Donald Trump’s selection of former Georgia Governor sonny Perdue to head the USDA. But now, as The Guardian reports, there is growing concern that Perdue will focus on global agribusiness to the detriment of American family farms.

Perdue’s history suggests he will prioritize the exporting of commodity crops for global markets. But this presents a couple of questions.

KFOR

An Oklahoma lawmaker is hoping to bring the Earned Income Tax Credit back to the Sooner State.

Until last year, the credit was a welcome relief for many low-income Oklahomans, by preventing them from paying more than their share of income tax. But, as KFOR reports, the Earned Income Tax Credit was abolished last year as part of an effort to plug the state’s $1.3 billion budget gap.

Twitter

A Texas Mosque that was burned down last week raised almost a million dollars for its rebuilding in an astounding show of support from well-wishers.

The New York Times reports that the Victoria Islamic Center raised over $900,000 on Saturday and Sunday, through an online fund-raising campaign and cash and checks from the local community.

Agua - Water Poems

Feb 1, 2017
Xánath Caraza, translated by Sandra Kingery

I am Xánath Caraza, and today I will read two bilingual poems from my book Donde la luz es violeta / Where the Light is Violet.

 

Agua  

 

Agua de las fuentes brota

con cada inhalación se adhiere agua de vida estás presente en las células del cuerpo y átomos.

Agua evaporada sofocas en este momento con el sol la densa atmósfera

en la que me muevo, agua que flota.

Agua que se abre, agua que salta.

Melodías de agua suenan en mi oído susurran viento, viento que se mezcla erosiona, que merma, hiende

se mete en la piel.

Emana a borbotones.

Me estremezco agua helada, agua sólida.

Deseos perdidos, agua recia, solidificados sentimientos, agua pétrea, tremenda pérdida.

Pixabay

Health officials are urging Kansans to get flu vaccines in the wake of high levels of influenza striking most regions of the state.

As The Wichita Eagle reports, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) is reporting that Kansas is now experiencing widespread influenza activity.

50states.com

Rural Colorado is most at risk in Trump trade war with Mexico.

As The Denver Post reports, if the Trump Administration imposes a 20 percent levy on Mexican imports to help pay for a border wall, a move that could cause Mexico to retaliate, it would put Colorado’s ranchers, manufacturers and natural gas producers at risk.

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BNSF Railway Company plans to spend significant money on track renovations for the line used by Amtrak for Southwest Chief passenger service.

As The Kansan reports, most of the $125 million that BNSF plans to use the money on the La Junta subdivision, meaning renovations to tracks from Emporia west to Topeka, Newton and Garden City.

The company announced its 2017 capital expenditure plan in a Jan. 19 news release.

Tom Woodward / Flickr Creative Commons

Support for school choice appears to be gaining momentum in Texas.

At a Capitol rally last week, Governor Greg Abbott and Lt. Governor Dan Patrick voiced their support for funneling tax dollars to private and religious schools.

Even so, as KXAN reports, public school advocates continue to form a strong opposition to the movement. Critics have noted that the institution of school choice plans presents a potential hardship for rural students.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

A war is brewing over what you pour on your breakfast cereal.

Dairy farmers say the makers of plant-based milks – like almond milk, soy milk and a long list of other varieties – are stealing away their customers and deceiving consumers. And they’d like the federal government to back them up.

At its heart, the fight boils down to the definition and use of one simple word: milk.

Wikimedia Commons

A bill being proposed in the Nebraska Legislature would protect Nebraskans from being sued over just a few hundred dollars in debt.

As ProPublica reports, a Nebraska lawmaker has introduced a bill that would curb what collectors can take from debtors after filing suit and obtaining a court judgment.

Colorado farm and ranch income has hit its lowest level in 30 years, according University of Colorado Boulder research.

As Colorado Public Radio reports, much of agriculture is suffering in Colorado, which like other parts of the High Plains region is facing low corn, wheat and cattle prices.

Federal court blocks Texas' fetal burial rule

Jan 31, 2017

A federal court has blocked Texas’s controversial fetal burial rule from going into effect.

As The Texas Tribune reports, U.S. District Court Judge Sam Sparks ruled last week that Texas cannot require health providers to bury or cremate fetuses, delivering another blow to state leaders in the reproductive rights debate.

In his ruling Friday, Sparks wrote that the Texas Department of State Health rule’s vagueness, undue burden and potential for irreparable harm were factors in his decision.

Creative Commons

After finally rising to over $50 dollars a barrel, oil prices have begun to slump again as U.S. producers continue to expand output.

As Bloomberg reports, U.S. drilling rose last week to its highest level in over a year. The expanded production comes after OPEC followed through on its promise to ramp down production. In the wake of the OPEC announcement, Russia also cut its drilling operations.

“One of the best flatpickers anywhere.”

—The Huffington Post 

Beppe Gambetta - Live in Amarillo

Chalice Abbey ~ 2717 Stanley

Doors @ 7p  |  Show @ 7:30p

Sugg. donation: $15

***ALERT: This show is SOLD OUT. 

***To be put on the WAITING LIST,  call HPPR at 806.367.9088 with your NAME & PHONE #. ***

Milagros - Miracles

Jan 30, 2017
Karen Madorin / Logan, Kansas

Hello, this is Karen Madorin from Logan, Kansas, sharing her insights into John Nichols’ The Milagro Beanfield War for High Plains Radio Readers. Like any book worth reading, this one generates a gazillion not necessarily related ideas. One of those is what is a Milagro?

When Nichols wrote this novel based on his own experiences, experts in the publishing business told him he’d have to change the title so it didn’t have a foreign term in it. Naysayers explained the reading public didn’t buy such books. He didn’t follow their directions. Now plenty of people have enjoyed it and learned that Milagro means miracle.

Roberts: First farm bill hearing to be held in Kansas

Jan 30, 2017
Sandra J. Milburn / The Hutchinson News

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The nation's first farm bill hearing will take place in Kansas.

Pat Roberts, R-Kansas, the chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry, and ranking member Debbie Stabenow, D-Michigan announced the hearing on the 2018 farm bill Wednesday.

According to a press release from the committee, the hearing will be Feb. 23 at McCain Auditorium on the Kansas State University campus in Manhattan.

Wikimedia Commons

Some regulatory freezes instituted by President Donald Trump could be damaging to the country’s farm belt, according to some agricultural groups.

As Reuters reports, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will delay implementation of this year’s biofuels requirements along with 29 other regulations finalized in the last weeks of Barack Obama’s presidency, according to a government notice, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture will delay rules affecting livestock.

polhudson.lohudblogs.com

A bill that would increase the penalty for texting while driving is gaining traction in Colorado after friends of a couple killed in an accident caused by texting and driving testified at the state capitol.

As The Denver Post reports, friends of Brian and Jacque Lehner, who were killed when a woman who was driving drunk and texting on her phone struck the couple’s motorcycle, told lawmakers Wednesday that it’s time to stiffen the penalties for doing so.

Luke Clayton

The process of curing and smoking ham is easy and something than anyone can accomplish at home.

Quilted treasures

Jan 28, 2017

I’d be the first to tell you I’m not a quilter and unlikely to become one unless catastrophe requires me to recycle old clothing remnants into blankets to warm me or my loved ones in the cold of winter. While I don’t have patience to construct such intricate coverlets, I admire those who do. When our youngest daughter learned to quilt in a high school sewing class, I was thrilled she’d continue a family tradition that has waned since my great-grandmother last sorted through her ragbag to come up with pieces to create a lovely blue and red star heirloom that my mother treasures.

Mattie Hagedorn / Wikimedia Commons

Researchers say U.S. adults only get half their recommended amount of daily fiber. That can cause many of us to reach for “whole grain” breads at the grocery store.

But now, as TIME magazine reports, nutritionists are warning consumers to be careful not to get duped. Not all whole grains are created equal.

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