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Growing on the High Plains Episode
9:48 am
Fri October 5, 2012

Perennial Division is a Gardening Budget Bonus

If your gardening budget is drooping, you can give it a transfusion by digging into your perennial bed.  This week's Growing on the High Plains gives all the basics for dividing many spring blooming plants that may have overgrown their space or become old and tired.  If you don't have an excess of perennials, perhaps you can offer to clear out and replant a neighbor's garden in exchange for some 'take home' cartons.  Fall is a great time to reorganize garden spaces and find that 'everything old is new again'.

High Plains Outdoors Episode
9:46 am
Fri October 5, 2012

One Shot Challenge

There’s something special about the one shot challenge of hunting with a muzzle loader. Luke and Larry have both done their share of shooting and hunting with ‘smoke poles.’  This show deals with not only the basics of muzzle loading but also highlights some tricks to get the most accuracy possibly from your front loading rifle.

High Plains History Episode
8:01 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Rawlins County Seat

Chicanery and hi-jinks were on tap in this non-violent but very heated county seat war.

Prairie Ramblings Episode
8:01 pm
Thu September 27, 2012

Early Morning Rambles

Sunrise on the Prairie

An early morning walk makes you healthy, wealthy in the abundance of nature, and wise in discovery.   It also makes the four-legged family friends very happy.  Karen Madorin is greeted by cardinals, rabbits, and the wide open vistas that bring to mind the smallness that early pioneers may have felt.

HPPR
8:01 pm
Thu September 27, 2012

Black Bear Numbers Increase

Looking Luke Straight in the Eye

Luke Clayton just returned from an elk hunt in Colorado mountains.  Bear numbers and sightings were at an all time high.  A couple close encounters gave Luke a photo to remember, and another guide an opportunity to share his candy bar.  Larry Weishuhn gives some insight into causes for the increased numbers.  Plus, as usual, a good bit of ‘hard core’ campfire talk!

Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:01 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

Sandhill Plums are a Jelly Favorite

This wonderful native shrub has a deeply history, as it provided a rare and welcome fruit for North American Indian tribes as well as early day settlers.  The roots of this manna of the plains literally run deep, searching out subsoil moisture and giving the little shrubs an ability to survive our infamous prairie winds.  Today the scarlet fruits are still a favorite for jelly, and are the basis for providing a product for many small-scale  local businesses on the High Plains.

High Plains History Episode
8:01 pm
Tue September 25, 2012

Sand Creek Survivor Becomes Famous Historical Figure

A survivor of the Sand Creek Massacre became a famous figure in Native American History.

Harvest Public Media feature story
11:40 am
Tue September 25, 2012

My Farm Roots: Entrusted with a legacy

Nathan Dorn stands in front of the feedlot on his family’s farm in Adams, Neb.
Camille Phillips/Harvest Public Media

Down a stretch of rural highway and country roads lined with fields, about an hour south of Lincoln, Neb., lies the Dorn family farm. That’s where Nathan Dorn grew up, where his grandfather farmed before him and where his father, uncles and cousin now farm beside him.

Dorn’s strong ties to the land made the decision to continue the family tradition of farming an easy one. But it also leaves him feeling misunderstood by the average American.

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5:52 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Kansas governor positions budget cutting

Lead in text: 
Kansas governor Sam Brownback is raising concerns about the national and global economy to justify state budget cut planning, deflecting concern over the impact of large tax reductions approved last year.
Gov. Sam Brownback's administration already has developed talking points to deflect anticipated criticism of the newly enacted massive income tax cuts should Kansas face significant budget problems next year. Critics said their fears about the aggressiveness of the cuts were confirmed by the conservative Republican governor's budget director in July, when he told state agencies to draft proposals for slicing up to 10 percent of their spending.
7:38 am
Mon September 24, 2012

Kansas eliminates Main Street program

Lead in text: 
Emails were sent last week by Kansas Commerce Department Secretary Pat George to 25 Main Street programs, including Garden City Downtown Vision, informing them of elimination of the program.
  • Source: Cjonline
  • | Via: Topeke Capital Journal
HUTCHINSON - The abrupt demise of a popular Kansas program that helped participating communities with downtown revitalization and small-business development has left many disappointed and perplexed.Kansas Commerce Department Secretary Pat George announced the elimination of the 27-year-old Kansas Main Street program in an email Thursday to officials of the 25 local programs around the state.
Highh Plains Outdoors Episode
1:47 pm
Fri September 21, 2012

Sighting in Rifles and Bows

Sighting Pins on a Bow

Shots can be in close range or from quite a distance, and out here on the high plains, your gun or bow needs to be ready for both.  A general rule is to sight in at different target distances.  It is also important to shoot a number of times a week from  different positions.     

Prairie Ramblings Episode
1:32 pm
Fri September 21, 2012

The Gold Coronado Missed

Hiking Boot Covered with Pollen

The search for gold compelled Spanish conquistador Coronado into Kansas.  Ironically, he found gold more valuable that the metal he hoped to find, but unfortunately did not recognize the value of the gold dust coating his boots and leggings.  Pollen is the essence of life, but without pollinators moving from plant to plant, creatures of every kind would lack fruits, vegetables, grains, and grasses. 

Growing on the High Plains Episode
6:30 am
Thu September 20, 2012

Gooseberries. You hate 'em or you love 'em

These little green orbs are kissin' cousins to the currant, and like their relatives they can be welcomed or reviled in the U.S.  They make great pies, jellies, jams, and sauces for the table, but they can also transport a destructive fungus called 'white pine blister rust'.  If your locale doesn't feature white pines then gooseberry bushes might make a good berry bramble for you, especially if you like your sweets a little on the tart side. 

High Plains History Episode
8:01 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

The Great Flood of 1965

1965 brought more water than folks knew what to do with when the Arkansas River flooded its banks.

Harvest Public Media feature story
1:26 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

My Farm Roots: From pastime to passion

Aaron Troester farms about 5,000 irrigated acres in north-central Nebraska.
Hilary Stohs-Krause for Harvest Public Media

Aaron Troester’s life both did, and didn’t, turn out exactly the way he planned.

The 29-year-old farmer in the north-central Nebraska town of O’Neill was pouring honey into jars from bees he keeps when I met him. I soon learned he had a chemistry degree and had planned to go to medical school, but the lure of the land he farms with his father changed his mind.

“All through grade school, I knew I wanted to farm,” Troester said. That changed in college, but a year spent back on the farm while waitlisted for med school slowly evolved from passing the time into passion.

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High Plains Outdoors Episode
8:30 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

The Rub Tells All

Deer rubs and rub lines tell you there is a buck in the area.  When the deer loses its velvet, you'll start seeing rubs.  It could be as simple as a hook in the brush or a rub on a tree.  The purpose of rubbing is to strengthen a deer's neck for the upcoming breeding season.   The size of the rub generally does indicate buck size.  You can also tell about antler structure by looking carefully at the rub.   Here on the high plains, you can find rubs on blue stem, sunflowers, fence posts, or windmill towers.   

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Prairie Ramblings Episode
8:00 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

How to Catch a Hummer

One of Fall's gifts is a migratory visitor to the High Plains.  A hummingbird feeder, some sugar solution, and a little patience brings a  hummingbird outside Karen Madorin's kitchen window.

My Farm Roots
9:50 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

My Farm Roots: Grateful to be home

Rose Alderson and her husband Loren have farmed outside of Nickerson, Kan., for decades.
Frank Morris/ Harvest Public Media

Rose Alderson is a bright-eyed, energetic grandmother who loves her home a few miles outside of Nickerson, Kan. It’s the home her father was raised in and where she raised her kids, but the house is not the most important part of the Alderson place.  

Alderson loves the barn and the silo. Neither building plays much of a role on the farm anymore, but to Rose, they are the soul of the place.  

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Growing on the High Plains Episode
6:30 am
Thu September 13, 2012

Jenny Lind Melon Celebrates Long History

A heritage melon with a history of over one hundred and fifty years is our GHP subject for this week.  Named for a famous Swedish musical celebrity that toured the U.S. in 1850 via P.T. Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth, the Jenny Lind melon became wildly popular.  This melon displays many of the qualities of its namesake, including sweetness and a small dainty size, and thus was perfect for growing in a backyard garden.  Today this heritage fruit is still popular, and easy to grow and serve.

High Plains History Episode
7:16 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Kids Find a Home in the Texas Panhandle

A philanthropist who wanted to give kids a place of their own founded a famous ranch in the Texas Panhandle.

Prairie Ramblings Episode
10:30 am
Sat September 8, 2012

The Insiders Guide to a Country Wave

One-finger city waves typically reflect someone's frustration, but in the country it simply means, "Good to see you."  Waves also reflect acknowledgement, warmth, and  personality.   For example, confident drivers use the pointer finger version, pickup and truck drivers seem to prefer the pointer and middle finger union wave, while some drivers are so relaxed they keep their plam on the wheel, and raise all four or eight digits in unison.   Urban drivers have said one of their favorite things about driving in the wide open spaces is greeting other drivers with a good, old fashioned, country

High Plains Outdoors Episode
7:30 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Scrapes Mark Territory

deer scrapes

Learn about the phenomenon of individual and communal deer scrapes.  Scrapes can be equated to pulling into a farmer's yard for a visit, and when you turn around, the dogs are marking their territory on your wheels.    Scrapes seem to be located at the intersection of well traveled paths.  They are most active in the fall before breeding season.  There are two kinds of scrapes- active and inactive.  Many scrapes are found along the path of least resistance, along brush lines, next to a draw, on a tree, the edge of a tree line, or in any type of terrain change.  The ideal time to look for sc

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Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed September 5, 2012

Peaches on the High Plains?

These sweet treats can be grown throughout the HPPR broadcast area, although the further north they bloom the more likely they will encounter some late freezes that will nip the year's crop in the bud.  But the smell and taste of home grown peaches makes it worth the gamble, and the trees will actually live a longer and more 'fruitful' life if they have occasional barren years for resting and restoring.  The trail of the peach begins in China thousands of years ago.  The flavorful fruit was introduced to our shores by the Spanish explorers.

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High Plains History Episode
6:24 am
Wed September 5, 2012

Mexican Immigrants Influence Southwest Kansas Community

Garden City has prospered by the labor, customs, and culture of hardworking immigrants from Old Mexico.

Prairie Ramblings
10:30 am
Sat September 1, 2012

Fireflies Secret Love Signal

The dance of the fireflies has a hidden meaning.  The little beacons are signaling they are looking for love, and they are under a time crunch.  With only two weeks to find a mate and propagate, it gives adults new insight into the childhood tradition of catching and putting them in a jar. 

High Plains Outdoors Episode
7:30 am
Sat September 1, 2012

Spot and Stalk is Challenging on the High Plains

Spot and stalk on the high plains is a completely different game.  Here, creatively seek out the highest vantage point.  That could be a windmill tower, a knoll, or even the top of your pickup cab.

Harvest Public Media Story
7:30 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Markets woo wary farmers

Daryl Larson, a farmer from McPherson, Kan., wants to be able to trust the markets, but is wary.
Jeremy Bernfeld/Harvest Public Media

Farmers are the bedrock of the agricultural commodities markets – after all, they make the products that are traded there.

But after the October bankruptcy of commodity trading firm MF Global and more recent allegations of shady dealings at Iowa futures firm Peregrine Financial, the bedrock is shaking.

That’s why CME Group, which owns the Chicago Board of Trade and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, is working hard to regain farmers’ trust.

Read more
Growing on the High Plains episode
6:30 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Rain Barrels

One of the hottest items in lots of gardening catalogues is the rain barrel, proving that 'everything old is new again'.  Throughout history we have found ways to save up rainy day water and then used it during dry times.  Today's offerings can make a fashion statement in your lawn or garden, but there are also some old-fashioned ways of conserving moisture that can provide a drink for thirsty plants.

High Plains History episode
6:30 am
Wed August 15, 2012

Railroad Town

In out regional history, many towns were founded or folded by the route of a railroad. Perhaps no town was more influenced by the rails than Canadian, Texas.

Growing on the High Plains episode
6:30 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Mowing

Though summer is the major growing season for most gardeners, it's also the major mowing season for many.  Today we'll  take a look at lawnmowers and the men who made them, beginning with four-legged 'natural clippers'.  These were followed by horse-drawn reels and walk-behinds that were eventually developed into the gas guzzling producers of one of the more controversial sounds of summer.

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