Michael Flippo / Thinkstock

The United States Department of Agriculture is releasing up to five million dollars in grants to help create or strengthen farm-to-school programs, reports

The competitive grants are part of a federal initiative further to increase foods from local farms and ranches in America’s school meals.

Sue Ogrocki / AP photo

Oklahoma has opened its first new abortion clinic in over forty years, reports Refinery29.

In fact, Gerald Ford was president the last time Oklahoma opened a new family planning clinic. The Trust Women South Wind Women's Center will provide many services to women, including abortions, Ob/Gyn care, family planning, adoption services, and emergency contraception.

Brendan Smialowski/Agence France-Presse / Getty Images

HPPR recently reported on a story about how, according to Census Bureau statistics, rural America is stagnating while cities are booming. But this weekend The New York Times took issue with this narrative and insisted that, in fact, income in rural America is growing, too.

The debate is about two lines in the recent Census Bureau report. According to the study, while incomes in metropolitan areas grew six percent, those in rural areas fell by two percent.

Creative Commons

Exactly how flat is Kansas?

As Atlas Obscura reports, Kansas geographer Jerry Dobson has been dogged his whole career by that very question. Finally, a few years ago, he and fellow Kansas geographer Joshua Campbell undertook to measure the flatness of every state in the union.

Elizabeth Renstrom / TIME

Almost a third of older Americans simply aren’t moving enough, a recent TIME article reports.

According to a new study, 28 percent of people over the age 50 are too sedentary. In fact, more than half of baby boomers don’t do any exercise at all. That’s despite the unquestionable and widely known health benefits of exercise.

One Neighbor's Story - Looking Back

Sep 21, 2016
ESTHER HONIG / KCUR 89.3 - Harvest Public Media

Greta Clark serves at the Director of Multicultural Programs at Dodge City Community College.  In the course of her work, she hears the stories of many immigrants who’ve come to the U.S. in search of better lives, safety, and goals and dreams.  Here she talks with one student who’s made a career translating for the district court and for immigration. He states that he is independent and has a job helping people resolve their problems.

US Department of Justice

President Obama’s labor secretary visited Colorado last week to push for a ballot measure that would raise Colorado’s minimum wage to $12 an hour by 2020, reports CBS 4 Denver.

U.S. Labor Secretary Tom Perez insists raising the minimum wage would have a positive impact on Colorado’s economy. However, studies vary widely on whether minimum wage hikes hurt or help state economies.

Creative Commons

Kansas recently came in seventh in the nation in the rate of obesity.

And a recent editorial in the Garden City Telegram took the Sunflower State to task for its unhealthy ways. In the last year, Kansas has risen from 13th to seventh in the rankings. Thirty-five percent of adults in Kansas are obese, up from 31 percent last year. Kentucky was the only other state to see its residents grow more obese.

In two weeks, Oklahoma will enter year two of its statewide stay on death-row executions, reports News 9.

Despite the long delay, there’s still no evidence that the state's board of corrections is drawing any closer to making a decision on execution protocol. The halt came in 2015 after a series of bungled executions sparked widespread shock and criticism. First Oklahoma nearly used the wrong drug on inmate Richard Glossip. Then that same drug was used to execute Charles Warner, who writhed in agony and took 43 minutes to die.

Amazon has plans to invest in a massive Texas wind farm, according to FuelFix.

The Seattle-based online retail giant is teaming up with Chicago’s Lincoln Clean Energy to build a 250-megawatt wind farm in Scurry County, west of Abilene. The company plans to begin operations in 2017.

The wind farm will feature 100 wind turbines which will power Amazon’s Texas’ facilities, with the leftover energy feeding into the overall state grid.

The Washington post

The number of uninsured Americans has dropped to its lowest level since before the Great Recession, reports The Washington Post.

The gains in insured citizens came primarily among people buying individual policies, rather than getting health benefits through a job. This includes, but is not limited to, those obtaining insurance under the Affordable Care Act.

As the ag industry continues to consolidate into larger and larger corporations, reactions from farmers and farm-groups have been decidedly mixed.

The Daily Yonder

The economic recovery continues apace in America’s cities. Unfortunately, reports The Daily Yonder, the same can’t be said of rural America.

While median household incomes improved for metropolitan areas last year, they did not improve for rural Americans. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, average rural residents saw their wages remain flat or even fall a bit from 2014 to 2015.


Wednesday will be an important day for Kansas public-school students, reports KSN.

In two days, the Kansas Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether the system is inadequately funded. The court will decide whether the Legislature is providing enough money for Kansas public school kids to receive a suitable education. Kansas schools and teacher groups are watching the developments closely.

Harry Cabluck / AP photo

A controversial Texas textbook on the Mexican-American experience is drawing widespread criticism, reports CBS News, with some critics claiming the book is “dripping with racism.”

The textbook has been determined by a state committee to contain many mistakes. The state’s education board held a hearing on the book last week. About 100 people signed up to speak, and the hearing even drew a busload of protestors to Austin.

Evan Vucci / AP photo

Republicans believe they’ve finally establish a political foothold in Colorado, reports The Denver Post.

Texas Tribune

Almost 3,000 Texans died from drug-related overdoses two years ago, and many of these were related to prescription opioid use.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has named prescription drug abuse as the fastest-growing drug problem in the country.

Nigel Parry / CNN

Donald Trump leads Hillary Clinton by double digits in Kansas, according to a new poll.

As The Wichita Eagle reports, the New York billionaire is ahead of the former Secretary of State by 12 points, 48 percent to 36 percent.

Libertarian Gary Johnson and Green Party candidate Jill Stein drew 8 percent and 2 percent, respectively.

In the race for U.S. Senate, Sen. Jerry Moran has a comfortable lead over his Democratic opponent Patrick Wiesner.

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt's campaign team has been spending a lot of money. But not much of that money is actually being spent on elections, reports NewsOK.

Pruitt and his campaign team have spent well over half a million dollars since the beginning of last year. That’s despite the fact that Pruitt is ineligible to run again and hasn’t said he’s seeking another office.

The New York Times

Four out of every ten U.S adults don’t vote. Turnout in the U.S. is lower than in Canada, Mexico and most of Europe.

Non-voters in the U.S. are often assumed to be young people, or Hispanics, or the poor. But the truth, according to The New York Times, is the majority of people who didn’t vote in the 2012 presidential election were white, middle-income and middle-aged.

Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

Several key Texas lawmakers have shown little interest in expanding Medicaid in Texas, according to The Texas Tribune.

E-commerce is transforming rural America in a lot of ways. In small towns, big-city conveniences are now only a click away. But, as The Wall Street Journal reports, the change comes with a price.

During most national election cycles, Colorado has long been known as a key battleground state. But this year Hillary Clinton is outpolling Donald Trump by a wide margin.

PBS recently reported from the reddest parts of the state. They were attempting to uncover why some Coloradans were switching their votes this season.

Michael Schumacher / Amarillo Globe-News

An Amarillo man who made headlines last month for his creative way of helping others is at it again.

Last month Kit Rudd gained statewide attention for living among the homeless in Amarillo to call attention to their plight. And now Rudd has announced that, later this month, he plans to ride the 300 miles to Dallas on horseback.

News on 6

Oklahoma continues to lead the nation in incarceration rates for women, reports News on 6.

As a matter of fact, the state appears to be leaving the competition in the dust. The state imprisoned women at a ten percent higher rate this year over last. And Oklahoma County imprisoned thirty-three percent more women this year than in 2015.

Gov. Mary Fallin has created a Justice Reform Task Force to examine state laws that lead to imprisonment.

They pray. They prey.

But pray/prey tell: why is it that gardeners have been seeing more of these elegant insects this year? Whatever the reason, they're a welcome sight -- not only for their alien-esque arabesques, but also because they feast on pests like something out of a horror film.

Hear more about mantids on this week's edition of Growing on the High Plains.

And it's a good one! (Don't forget your popcorn.) 

Joe Amon / The Denver Post

The United States has unseated Germany to become the top producer of hops in the world—thanks in large part to the efforts of Colorado.

As The Denver Post reports, the U.S. has regained the title of world hop leader for the first time in decades. Over the last two years, Colorado has experienced an estimated 166 percent increase in total acres of hops planted. The acreage serves to support the state’s more than 300 craft breweries.

Rich / Creative Commons

A new study finds that, on average, Nebraska counties that receive a certain livestock-friendly designation gain more cattle farms and lose fewer hog farms than counties without it, reports The Sioux City Journal.

The designation is part of a program created by the Nebraska Legislature over ten years ago. Some rural counties are give0n the designation, and this often leads to more business.

Kansas Department of Corrections

A case disputing the constitutionality of solitary confinement in Kansas is moving forward, reports The Topeka Capital-Journal.

Paul Hellstern / The Oklahoman

Oklahoma’s education superintendent has vowed that she will fight for a ballot measure that would provide $5,000 raises to Oklahoma’s teachers, reports NewsOK.

State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister indicated that she will support the legislation even though the measure isn’t ideal. Hofmeister said something must be done to address Oklahoma’s shrinking pool of teachers.