High Plains Outdoors
8:00 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Bring home the fish, but leave the mussels

Zebra mussels are very small.
Credit pelicanlakemn.org

The spread of Zebra mussels in Texas lakes has caused for new regulations that all fishermen/boaters should be aware of. Beginning July 1, boaters must drain all water from their boat and on-board receptacles before leaving or approaching  a body of fresh water anywhere in Texas.

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Inside HPPR
5:18 am
Fri July 11, 2014

hONEyhoUSe show in Amarillo on July 18 is sold out!

This is another first for HPPR's Living Room Concert series- we have sold out this performance on July 18.  We are taking stand by reservations, and will accommodate  as many people as possible.  We thank you for the great response and for your continued support of HPPR and live music!

HPPR Environment
8:01 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

EPA promotes water rule to farmers

EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy speaks to reporters at Heffernan Farm in Rocheport, Mo., July 9, 2014.
Credit Kris Husted/Harvest Public Media

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency is touring farm country, trying to assure farmers that the agency isn’t asking for more authority over farmers and ranchers’ lands.

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Water Conservation
8:00 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Kansas water plan team gets an earful in Hays

Credit kwo.org

The water plan for the state of Kansas was recently unveiled.  The goal is to ensure a reliable water supply for the future according to a recent article from the Washington Times.

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6:41 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Farmers hoping for more rain

Lead in text: 
More rain could turn things around for farmers, but if the weather turns hot and dry, it could be a repeat of last year.
Some Oklahoma farmers say there's "cautious optimism" that patchy rains this summer will make a dent in the drought afflicting much of the state and help
Read More: http://kgou.org
Climate
8:00 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Recent rains didn’t drown drought conditions

Credit droughtmonitor.unl.edu

Recent rains did not significantly change drought conditions for most of the High Plains. 

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Growing on the High Plains
8:00 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

The Great Tomato Race

Credit feastingonpixels.blogspot.com

To participants in the great tomato race, the fourth of July is a big deal.  It’s the finish line for the green thumb trying to win the title of “The First Tomato of the Season.”  

If you missed out on this race, there are more tomato contests to come, like trying to win the distinction of growing “The Biggest Tomato” later this summer.     

Camp Amache
8:00 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Unearthing Amache: The story begins

Credit Angela Rueda

Denver University anthropology student, Anika Cook, shares her impression of the people who lived at Camp Amache and what she's learned so far.

My name is Anika Cook.  I'm an anthropology student at the University of Denver (DU).  DU is conducting a field school at Camp Amache.  The project is focused on researching, interpreting, and preserving the tangible history of Amache, one of ten WWII-era Japanese American internment camps.

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Camp Amache
8:00 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Unearthing Amache: A brief history lesson

http://www.amache.org/photo-archives/

The Granada War Relocation Center, also known as Camp Amache, was a Japanese American internment camp located just south of US Highway 50 about a mile west of the small, farming community of Granada, Colorado.  It is an agricultural area with a semi-arid climate.  The Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad track lies just south of the camp.  

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Link to export markets
8:01 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

100 years on, Panama Canal still vital to farm economy

A loaded container ship passes through the Miaflores Locks on the Panama Canal in 2006.
Jean-Pierre Martineau/Flickr

When it opened in 1914, the Panama Canal introduced the harvest from Midwest farms to the world and helped link U.S. farmers to the global economy. Nearly a century-old, the canal today remains an important connector of global trade, from the U.S. heartland to Asia.

“Obviously it’s one of our major achievements,” said Bill Angrick, a former state Ombudsman of Iowa who was born in the Canal Zone and has studied the engineering marvel. “It’s like going to the moon. It’s something we did well and did right.”

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