Open Range

Open Range could bring to mind images of campfires, cowboys, wide open spaces, and endless skies… but here on HPPR, it means the freedom to roam musical airwaves without boundaries or fences. Wherever you find yourself, it's the perfect companion. High Plains Public Radio's own Stephen Johnson weaves music as diverse as the colors of a tapestry into a beautiful soundtrack. The pallet could have the shades of classic Ella Fitzgerald, the hues of contemporary soulful Amanda Marshall, tints of poet Lyle Lovett, the rugged dyes of Bruce Springsteen, or perhaps even the soft watercolor twang of Hank Thompson. Open Range has one guiding thread, and that is great music.

Contact Stephen Johnson.

Art Of The Song on HPPR

Art of the Song is a one-hour syndicated radio show with music and interviews exploring inspiration and creativity through songwriting and other art forms. Learn why songwriters and artists create, how they become inspired, and how you can tap into that creative source in every aspect of your life.

http://www.artofthesong.org/

Blues Quest on HPPR

Based in Kansas City, Blues Quest is a living history of the origins of American music told by one musician at a time. Each week Blues Quest devotes an one-hour episode to one blues-based artist. The artists tell their stories in their own words and music and share their musical influences.

http://www.prx.org/series/31398-blues-quest

BBC World Service on HPPR

BBC World Service is the world's leading international broadcaster providing programmes and content for radio, television, online and mobile phones in English and 27 other languages.

Sweetness And Light
10:43 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Mind Games: Football And Head Injuries

Attorney William T. Gibbs (left), and Tregg Duerson, son of former Chicago Bears player Dave Duerson, announce the filing of a wrongful death lawsuit against the NFL on Feb. 23 in Chicago. The lawsuit accuses the NFL of negligently causing the brain damage that led Duerson to take his own life at 50, by not warning him of the negative effects of concussions.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 3:14 am

Even as the great, sad Junior Seau killed himself, more and more other old football players are joining in class action to sue the National Football League. They're claiming, generally, that while the NFL understood — for years — how vulnerable its players were to head injuries, the league did not sufficiently warn players about the danger of concussions.

Nor did the teams first do no harm — instead, allowing players to go back into games when they should have been kept out of the action.

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It's All Politics
10:42 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Partisan Psychology: Why Are People Partial To Political Loyalties Over Facts?

President Bush and then-Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry shake hands at the end of a presidential debate in 2004 in St. Louis. Researchers want to better understand why partisans' views of the facts change in light of their political loyalties.
Charlie Reidel AP

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 5:32 am

When pollsters ask Republicans and Democrats whether the president can do anything about high gas prices, the answers reflect the usual partisan divisions in the country. About two-thirds of Republicans say the president can do something about high gas prices, and about two-thirds of Democrats say he can't.

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As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and human interest features. He moved into this role in 2006, after four years as NPR's Midwest correspondent.

Law
10:37 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Fla. Court To Rule: Can A Lawyer Be Undocumented?

Jose Godinez-Samperio, an undocumented immigrant, passed the Florida bar exam in 2011. Now, the bar says it will admit him only with approval from the state Supreme Court.
Kathleen Flynn

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 11:22 pm

It sounds like a typical American success story: A young boy becomes an academic standout, an Eagle Scout and high school valedictorian. Later, he attends college and then law school, all on full scholarships.

But Jose Godinez-Samperio's story is not typical. He's an undocumented immigrant from Mexico — and now he's fighting to be admitted to the Florida bar.

Godinez-Samperio was just 9 years old when he came to the U.S. with his parents. They entered the country legally, but overstayed their visas and settled in the Tampa area.

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National Security
10:35 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Cyber Briefings 'Scare The Bejeezus' Out Of CEOs

Cybersecurity analysts work in the watch and warning center during the first tour of the government's secretive cyberdefense lab intended to protect the nation's power, water and chemical plants, electrical grid and other facilities on Sept. 29, 2011, in Idaho Falls, Idaho.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 4:02 pm

For the CEOs of companies such as Dell and Hewlett-Packard, talk of cyberweapons and cyberwar could have been abstract. But at a classified security briefing in spring 2010, it suddenly became quite real.

"We can turn your computer into a brick," U.S. officials told the startled executives, according to a participant in the meeting.

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Ron Elving is the NPR News' Senior Washington Editor directing coverage of the nation's capital and national politics and providing on-air political analysis for many NPR programs.

Elving can regularly be heard on Talk of the Nation providing analysis of the latest in politics. He is also heard on the "It's All Politics" weekly podcast along with NPR's Ken Rudin.

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