NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
6:48 am
Tue December 10, 2013

In Qatar, Hagel Tours Command Center That May Or May Not Exist

U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel visited the Combined Air and Space Operations Center in the tiny Persian Gulf nation of Qatar on Tuesday morning, the last leg of a tour that has also taken him to Bahrain, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia.

Read more
Shots - Health News
6:39 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Don't Count On Insurance To Pay For Genetic Tests

After genetic testing revealed a heightened risk for breast cancer, Angelina Jolie had a precautionary double mastectomy.
Alastair Grant AP

The day when a simple blood test or saliva sample can identify your risk for medical conditions ranging from cancer to Alzheimer's disease seems tantalizingly close.

But genetics specialists say the hype around many of these tests has outstripped the science. Insurers generally only cover a test if there's strong scientific evidence that it can provide a health benefit to patients.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:33 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Snow Follows On Heels Of Ice Storm In The East

A person walks on a deserted walkway on a snowy morning in New York City on Tuesday. People who live along the East Coast and the Appalachians woke up to snow Tuesday, forcing school closings and closed roads.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 1:53 pm

(This post was updated at 5:30 p.m. ET)

A fast-moving winter storm swept through the Eastern U.S. on Tuesday, bringing several inches of snow to the region, causing flights to be canceled, traffic to be snarled and federal government offices in Washington, D.C., to be shut for the day.

Northern Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and southern New England got up to 6 inches of snow, and the nation's midsection experienced frigid temperatures.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:26 am
Tue December 10, 2013

U.K. Rescue Center Overrun With Orphaned (And Adorable) Seal Pups

Men take pictures as they try to move a seal pup away from a house, which has fallen into the sea, during a storm surge in Hemsby, eastern England, on Dec. 6.
Darren Staples Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:29 am

We guarantee this is the saddest and cutest story you'll hear about all day: About 263 seal pups were swept away from their mothers by a massive tidal surge near Norfolk in the U.K. recently.

Now, a wildlife center is struggling to cope with about 100 of them, who will need to be bottle fed and rehabilitated.

Read more
The Salt
6:12 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Fresh Research Finds Organic Milk Packs In Omega-3s

Cows graze in a pasture at the University of New Hampshire's organic dairy farm in Lee, N.H., Sept. 27, 2006.
JIM COLE AP

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 9:35 am

While milk consumption continues to fall in the U.S., sales of organic milk are on the rise. And now organic milk accounts for about 4 percent of total fluid milk consumption.

For years, organic producers have claimed their milk is nutritionally superior to regular milk. Specifically, they say that because their cows spend a lot more time out on pasture, munching on grasses and legumes rich in omega-3 fatty acids, the animals' milk is higher in these healthy fats, which are linked to a reduced risk of heart disease.

Read more
Remembrances
5:51 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Too Young To Remember Mandela's Leadership, But Not His Legacy

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:11 am

In Soweto, South Africa, NPR's Gregory Warner speaks with people attending Nelson Mandela's memorial service — some who are too young to remember the late leader's years as president.

Nelson Mandela, 1918-2013
5:51 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Mandela Remembered In Soweto, South Africa

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:11 am

NPR offers the latest updates from Nelson Mandela's memorial service in Soweto, South Africa.

Nelson Mandela, 1918-2013
5:51 am
Tue December 10, 2013

In Soweto, World Leaders Remember Mandela's Legacy

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 5:57 am

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton offers an update on Nelson Mandela's memorial from Soweto's FNB Stadium.

The Two-Way
5:02 am
Tue December 10, 2013

GM Says Its First Female CEO Will Take Over Next Month

General Motors executive Mary Barra, seen here in January, will become the automaker's first female CEO. She will replace Dan Akerson, 65, who is retiring.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 9:18 am

Mary Barra will become the new leader of General Motors in January, the company announced Tuesday. A longtime GM veteran, Barra is currently an executive vice president; her tenure as CEO will begin after current leader Dan Akerson retires on Jan. 15.

Barra, 51, works in the company's global product development unit. She will soon become the first woman to lead a major automaker, as The Detroit Free Press reports.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:43 am
Tue December 10, 2013

To Get Kids Exercising, Schools Are Becoming Creative

Students at Northeast Elementary Magnet, in Danville, Ill., play around. Fewer than 1 in 5 parents polled said their kids were getting physical education daily.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 9:42 am

Avery Stackhouse, age 7, of Lafayette, Calif., says he wishes he had more time for phys ed.

"We just have it one day a week — on Monday." There's always lunch and recess, he says. "We play a couple of games, like football and soccer," he tells Shots.

But at Happy Valley Elementary, where he goes to school, recess lasts only 15 minutes and lunch is 45. Between eating and mingling, he says, "there's only a few minutes left where we play games and all that."

Read more
The Two-Way
4:28 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Brazilian Leader's 1976 Death Found To Be A Military Murder

A military plot has been blamed in the death of Brazil's former President Juscelino Kubitschek, seen here at the White House in 1961 speaking with President John F. Kennedy. For years, Kubitschek's death was blamed on a car accident.
William Allen AP

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 9:00 am

For years, a car accident has been blamed in the 1976 death of former Brazilian President Juscelino Kubitschek. But a new inquiry has found the politician was murdered by the military dictatorship that ruled Brazil for 21 years.

"We have no doubt that Juscelino Kubitschek was the victim of a conspiracy, a plot and a political attack," Sao Paulo Truth Commission leader Gilberto Natalini says, according to Agence France-Presse.

Read more
Remembrances
4:21 am
Tue December 10, 2013

As Rain Pours, Mourners Celebrate Mandela's Legacy

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. More than 50,000 people attended a rainy and emotional memorial for Nelson Mandela today in Johannesburg. Scores of world leaders and dignitaries were in attendance, including President Barack Obama, who gave a lengthy tribute to the man he credits for inspiring his own journey into politics. NPR's Gregory Warner reports from Johannesburg.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

Read more
The Salt
4:05 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Microbiome Candy: Could A Probiotic Mint Help Prevent Cavities?

A sweet way to avoid the dentist? Microbiologists are developing a probiotic mint that uses dead bacteria to fight off cavities.
Morgan Walker NPR

Eat candy and fight tooth decay. What a sweet concept, right?

Well, microbiologists in Berlin are trying to make that dream a reality.

They've created a sugarless mint that's aimed at washing out cavity-causing bacteria from your mouth. And the candy works in a curious way: It's spiked with dead bacteria. It's like probiotics for your teeth.

The experimental mint is still in the early days of development — and far from reaching the shelves at Walgreens.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:32 am
Tue December 10, 2013

With Many Police On Strike, Looters Hit Argentina's Stores

Supermarket employees try to recover items left by looters in San Miguel de Tucuman, Argentina, on Monday. Looting has spread across Argentina as mobs take advantage of strikes by police demanding pay raises to match inflation.
Bruno Cerimele AP

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 8:52 am

Chaos is visiting the Christmas season in Argentina, as police in many regions have refused to work until they get a pay raise. The lack of law enforcement has spurred looting in which at least five people have died and hundreds more have been injured. Some shop owners have taken up arms to defend themselves.

In Chaco province, the casualties include police deputy superintendent Cristián Vera, who died after being shot by looters in a supermarket, reports Data Chaco.

Read more
Nelson Mandela, 1918-2013
2:47 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Obama Calls For Self-Reflection On Mandela's 'Heroic Life'

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. At a soccer stadium in South Africa before a crowd notable for its dancing and for the umbrellas it is holding up against the rain, President Obama is speaking in a memorial service for former South African President Nelson Mandela. He said just a moment ago: The world thanks you for sharing Nelson Mandela with us. And let's listen to a little bit more of the president today.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:37 am
Tue December 10, 2013

LISTEN: President Obama Delivers A Eulogy For Nelson Mandela

President Obama delivers a speech Tuesday during the memorial service for late South African President Nelson Mandela in Johannesburg.
Alexander Joe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:41 am

During Tuesday's memorial service at South Africa's largest soccer stadium, President Obama delivered a 20-minute eulogy that compared Mandela to Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Abraham Lincoln and America's founding fathers.

Mandela, Obama said in Johannesburg, was the "last great liberator of the 20th century." He was not only a man of politics, but a pragmatist and flawed human being who managed to discipline his anger to turn centuries of oppression into what Mandela liked to call a "Rainbow Nation."

Read more
Business
2:29 am
Tue December 10, 2013

High Stakes For Banks As Volcker Rule Is Finalized

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News, I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Federal regulators have unveiled the final version of what has come to be called the Volcker Rule. It's a big part of the financial reform that went into affect three years ago. It's taken all those years to come up with the language that will set new limits on the kinds of trading that banks can do and cannot do. NPR's Jim Zarolli joins us now to talk about this. Hi Jim.

JIM ZAROLLI, BYLINE: Hi.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:15 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Honoring Mandela, In Gestures Large And Small

People holding a South African flag sing as they arrive at Ellis Park in Johannesburg, South Africa, to watch a telecast of the Nelson Mandela memorial service on Tuesday.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Standing in a steady drizzle at dawn, Lerato Maphanga took a black marker to a whitewashed wall that's serving as a condolences board outside Nelson Mandela's old home in Soweto, South Africa.

"Thank you, Tata [father], rest in peace," she wrote Tuesday. Then she signed it, "Born Free," a reference to the black South Africans born after apartheid ended in the 1994 election that made Mandela the country's first black president.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:14 am
Tue December 10, 2013

French Court Sentences Executive For Selling Faulty Breast Implants

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 9:16 am

A French court has sentenced the head of a company that sold tens of thousands of defective breast implants to four years in prison for aggravated fraud. Poly Implant Prothese was once among the world's leaders in supplying implants. But its product was found to have a high rupture rate.

From Paris, NPR's Eleanor Beardsely reports:

"The Marseilles court convicted Jean-Claude Mas, the founder of the company, and three colleagues.

Read more
Strange News
1:30 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Canada Aims To Take North Pole Into Its Nautical Borders

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Strange News
1:30 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Florida Capitol's Nativity Sparks Call For Pabst Festivus Pole

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

There will be a Nativity scene inside the Florida State Capitol Building. The Florida Prayer Network put up the scene, with a state permit. Chaz Stevens thinks that's an annoying mixture of church and state, so he applied for a permit for a Festivus pole, honoring the fake religion made up on the TV show "Seinfeld." The Festivus pole will be made of Pabst Blue Ribbon cans. Other displays allowed in the rotunda include a Bill of Rights Nativity banner.

Business
12:12 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Women Still Largely Absent From Corporate Boards

Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook, is one of the relatively few women to serve on major corporate boards.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:11 am

Women are still not making headway when it comes to getting on corporate boards or into senior leadership roles within big companies.

New research out Tuesday examined Fortune 500 Companies and found that women hold only about 17 percent of the seats on boards of directors, and they have an even smaller share — about 15 percent — of senior executive positions.

Read more
U.S.
12:12 am
Tue December 10, 2013

For Veterans, 'Bad Paper' Is A Catch-22 For Treatment

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 6:20 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In many ways, military veterans hold a privileged place in American society, but not all vets have access to what goes along with that privilege. In the past decade of war, more than 100,000 men and women left the military with less than honorable discharges, many due to bad conduct related to post traumatic stress disorder. Once they're kicked out of the military, they lose access to benefits like treatment for PTSD.

Read more
Business
12:12 am
Tue December 10, 2013

BP Argues Companies Are Unfairly Cashing In On 2010 Spill

The Deepwater Horizon oil rig burns in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:56 am

Oil giant BP is challenging hundreds of millions of dollars in claims that were filed by businesses after the company's 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

The total price tag for BP's oil spill is huge — $42.5 billion. At issue here is a fraction of that — but still a lot of money. BP says $540 million has been awarded to businesses for losses that "are either nonexistent, exaggerated or have nothing to do with the Deepwater Horizon accident."

Read more
The Two-Way
11:53 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

WATCH: Local Coverage Of Mandela's Memorial Service

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:29 am

Thousands of mourners and dozens of world leaders gathered in Johannesburg, South Africa this morning to celebrate the life of the late Nelson Mandela.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:33 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

South Africa Honors Mandela, An 'Incomparable Force Of Leadership'

Members of the public sing and dance as they arrive for the Nelson Mandela memorial service at the FNB Stadium, on Tuesday in Johannesburg, South Africa.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 9:34 am

(This post was last updated at 9:27 a.m. ET.)

The skies were gray over Johannesburg this morning. And the rain was relentless.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:45 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

Ethics Panel Hands Down Holiday Gift Rules — In Rhyme

The U.S. Capitol Christmas tree is lit against the early morning sky on Dec. 4.
J. David Ake AP

Time was when business-suited Santas would spend December roaming the corridors of Congress, bestowing all sorts of goodies upon their elected friends, prospective friends and staffers: baskets of food, bottles of booze, even high-priced tickets to sports events.

That last item is the kind of thing that sent uber-lobbyist Jack Abramoff to prison. It also brought the House of Representatives a new set of ethics rules — stern and often complex limits on accepting gifts.

Read more
Law
1:15 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

L.A. Sheriff's Deputies Indicted On Corruption, Civil Rights Abuses

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 5:45 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In Los Angeles today, federal prosecutors announced charges of corruption and civil rights abuses inside the nation's largest jail system. The indictments came against 18 current and former deputies of the LA Sheriff's Department. NPR's Kirk Siegler has details from outside the federal building in downtown Los Angeles.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:09 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

Senate GOP Could Taste Sweet Revenge In Supreme Court Case

Miguel Estrada, whose 2002 nomination to a federal judgeship was filibustered by Senate Democrats, will represent Senate Republicans in their recess appointments case against President Obama.
Kiichiro Sato AP

If revenge is a dish best served cold, in Washington it can also be served with a heaping side of irony.

The Supreme Court agreed Monday to Sen. Mitch McConnell's request to let Senate Republicans participate in the high-profile case Noel Canning v. National Labor Relations Board.

Read more
All Tech Considered
12:47 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

Teens Dig Digital Privacy, If Snapchat Is Any Indication

Three high school students in Oakland, Calif., swap photos using Snapchat.
Ike Sriskandarajah Youth Radio

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 5:45 am

The track record of commercial products designed with privacy as a top priority has been abysmal — at least until recently. The ephemeral texting app Snapchat is turning assumptions upside down about young people and their desire for digital privacy.

Fred Cate, director of applied cybersecurity research at Indiana University, is an expert on privacy in the digital age. But when it comes to the viability of tech products that promise privacy, Cate has always been skeptical.

Read more

Pages