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The Two-Way
5:52 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Toronto City Council Aims To Strip Away Mayor's Powers

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford and his wife, Renata, during a news conference Thursday.
Mark Blinch Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 6:37 am

"Mayor Rob Ford will essentially be mayor in name only after Monday," writes the Toronto Sun. "Three special council meetings — two to be held Friday and one on Monday — have been called to strip Ford of all the powers delegated to him by council and slash his mayor's office budget."

Friday's session began just after 9:30 a.m. ET and is being webcast here by CTV News.

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The Two-Way
5:32 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Mighty Sachin Has Bowed Out: It's Over For Tendulkar

A poster in Mumbai this week of Sachin Tendulkar, India's cricket superstar.
Punit Paranjpe AFP/Getty Images

Sachin Tendulkar, the "little master" who is known as India's greatest cricketer, left the pitch Friday for what's likely to be the last time.

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The Two-Way
5:28 am
Fri November 15, 2013

We Beheaded The Wrong Man, Syrian Terrorists Say

A member of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant urges Syrians in the city of Aleppo to fight against the Assad regime. This week, the militants apologized for beheading a commander from another anti-Assad group.
Karam al-Masri AFP/Getty Images

"Militant Islamist rebels in Syria ... have asked for 'understanding and forgiveness' for cutting off and putting on display the wrong man's head," The Telegraph reports.

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It's All Politics
4:37 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Friday Political Mix: Obama's Health Care Fallout Writ Large

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 7:07 am

Good morning.

Or, bad morning, if you're President Obama and absorbing the profound political reality of the botched health care law rollout, and your attempt at a fix.

We'll let the headlines tell the story:

Wall Street Journal: "Obama Retreats on Health Care Rules"

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TED Radio Hour
4:20 am
Fri November 15, 2013

What Are The Lives of Chinese Factory Workers Really Like?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 10:06 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Misconceptions.

About Leslie T. Chang's TEDTalk

Behind all our material goods, from iPhones to sneakers, is a narrative of exploited Chinese workers with bleak lives. Reporter Leslie T. Chang says that's a disrespectful narrative. She sought out workers in a Chinese megacity and tells their stories.

About Leslie T. Chang

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TED Radio Hour
4:20 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Misconceptions

In this episode, TED speakers will make you think twice about things you thought were true.
Steve McAlister Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:39 am

What if truths we believe in are completely wrong? In this hour, TED speakers move beyond conventional wisdom to reveal complex realities about what we think we know to be true.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:11 am
Fri November 15, 2013

China Unveils Major Economic Changes

An investor is seen at a brokerage house in Shanghai, China, on Aug. 16.
Ding Ting Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 6:32 am

We told you this morning about changes announced in China regarding the country's one-child policy, as well as an announcement that it was ending its system of labor camps. But those aren't the only policy shifts by the Communist Party.

China also said Friday that it would loosen restrictions on foreign investment in e-commerce and other businesses, and allow private competition in state-dominated sectors.

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The Salt
4:06 am
Fri November 15, 2013

How Coffee, Citrus And Nuts Help Cut The Risk Of Diabetes

Coffee can help cut your risk of Type 2 diabetes, fresh research shows. Other foods, such as oranges, lemons and other citrus fruits, nuts and beans can also help.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 9:45 am

If you go back to the 1970s, people with a serious coffee habit often had an accompanying habit: smoking.

And that's why early studies gave coffee a bad rap. Clearly, smoking was harmful. And it was hard for researchers to disentangle the two habits. "So it made coffee look bad in terms of health outcomes," Harvard researcher Meir Stampfer explained to me.

But fast-forward a quarter century, and the rap on coffee began to change.

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The Two-Way
3:34 am
Fri November 15, 2013

China Eases One-Child Policy, Ends Labor Camp System

Children participate in a drawing contest on May 13 celebrating international children's day in Qingdao, China.
Wu Hong EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 6:47 am

China announced Friday that it is loosening its decades-old one-child policy, and abolishing its system of "re-education through labor" camps.

In order to have a second child, one parent would have to be an only child under the new rules. Previously, both parents had to be only children in order to have a second child.

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Asia
3:19 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Ikea's Typhoon Aid Overshadows China's Aid To Philippines

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: missed opportunity.

The typhoon in the Philippines prompted the U.S. to send money, food and an aircraft carrier, all of which may deepen relations with that U.S. Ally. China has tense relation with the Philippines but did not try the same gambit.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Asia
3:12 am
Fri November 15, 2013

China Expected To Loosen One-Child Policy

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

A state-run news service says the government will make a big change to the policy designed to restrain population growth. That policy has also led to a relative shortfall of young people and especially of girls.

Animals
2:50 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Researchers Figure Out Found Clam Was 507 Years Old

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The next time you dip into a bowl of clam chowder, consider this. You might be consuming a clam that has lived through a lot of history. We know this because a mollusk named Ming was 507 years old when it was dredged up in the ocean off Iceland a few years ago. When they first counted the rings on the shell of this common clam, scientists at Bangor University in Wales named it Ming in honor of the Chinese dynasty it was born into. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
2:23 am
Fri November 15, 2013

New Jersey Utility Plans To Keep Super Bowl Power Flowing

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

This season's Super Bowl requires the same electricity flow as 12,000 homes. The utility for New Jersey, which is hosting the game, wants to keep that power flowing. The nightmare would be a repeat of last season's 34-minute blackout in New Orleans. So the company installed three power lines, any one of which could run the event. Hopefully that works since the last power failure was blamed on a broken device installed to prevent power failures.

Movie Reviews
2:19 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Bruce Dern's 'Transcendent Performance' In 'Nebraska'

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Back in May at the Cannes film festival, Bruce Dern won the best acting award for "Nebraska." That movie is now opening in theaters in the U.S. and here's film critic Kenneth Turan with a review.

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It's All Politics
2:03 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Polls Reveal Season Of Record-Breaking Voter Anger

A recent poll reported that the approval rating for Congress is at a record low.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 9:21 am

The American public is clearly ticked off. Between the government shutdown, the troubled rollout of the Affordable Care Act, and the pace of the economic recovery, poll after poll reports signs of deep frustration and unrest.

Anger toward politicians and government isn't exactly a new phenomenon. What is unusual, however, is the sheer number of polling records that have been set in recent weeks — both lows and highs.

Here's a sampling:

Congressional Approval Rating

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The Two-Way
2:02 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Wait Continues In The Philippines: 'We Have Nothing To Eat'

A boy stands amid ruins in Tacloban, the Philippines. The city of 220,000 was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 6:02 pm

Aid is starting to get to some of the survivors of Typhoon Haiyan, but the sad news from the Philippines on Friday is that for many of the storm's victims things still aren't much better after a week without adequate food, water or shelter.

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Typhoon Haiyan Devastates The Philippines
1:48 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Devastated Philippine City No Stranger To Calamity

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The American air craft carrier George Washington is now serving as a launching platform for typhoon aid in the Philippines. It's the latest chapter in relations between two countries that share a long and intimate history. The relationship includes many Filipinos who have moved to the United States, like novelist Gina Apostol.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

She grew up in Tacloban. We found her in Massachusetts where she's been tracking down her relatives in that devastated city.

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Politics
11:50 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

House To Vote On GOP Solution To Canceled Insurance

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. The first part of October was a political disaster for the Republican Party. After being blamed for the government shutdown, the GOP approval rating fell to historic lows.

MONTAGNE: The weeks since have become a political disaster for Democrats. Problems with the Affordable Care Act have knocked President Obama's poll ratings as low as they've ever been.

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Business
11:50 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Game Consoles Marketed As Multimedia Living Room Boxes

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

If a video game fan in your office calls in sick to work today, it may be because the new PlayStation 4 went on sale this morning. It is Sony's first new PlayStation home console in seven years. And next week, Microsoft follows it up with a new Xbox. Each of these devices has its own marketing strategy. PlayStation is promoting itself for games - as you might expect. Xbox wants you to think of the console as something much more.

(SOUNDBITE OF MICROSOFT AD)

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Xbox on.

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Politics
11:50 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Obama Apologizes, Offers Fix To Insurance Cancellations

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

President Obama has acknowledged the fumbled rollout of his signature health care law has hurt his credibility and that of fellow Democrats. He offered a minor change to the law in hopes of calming Democratic nerves, and beating back bigger changes proposed by House Republicans.

Business
11:50 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Health Care Cancellation Cure Could Lead To Higher Premiums

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

The health care fix announced by President Obama on Thursday may be good news for some consumers, but it creates a big headache for insurance companies and regulators. An insurance industry trade group warns the last-minute change could destabilize the market and lead to higher premiums.

Business
11:50 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Judge: Google's Book Copying Doesn't Violate Copyright Law

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Google won a key victory in a nearly decade-long lawsuit over fair use of the collections of works at the New York Public Library, the Library of Congress and various other university libraries. A U.S. circuit court judge in Manhattan found Google's project to digitally copy millions of books for online searches does not violate copyright law.

NPR's Laura Sydell reports.

LAURA SYDELL, BYLINE: Google began scanning books back in 2004, many of the works were by living authors.

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StoryCorps
10:35 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Making New Connections On A Trapped Subway Train

New York City subway conductor Paquita Williams (left) and passenger Laura Lane became friends after a two-hour train breakdown.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 7:37 am

Laura Lane met Paquita Williams, a New York City subway conductor, when their train was stopped underground for two hours. Generally, Paquita says, most passengers are nice, but "there's times if the train breaks down, people think that's my fault."

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Shots - Health News
10:32 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Medicare Penalizes Nearly 1,500 Hospitals For Poor Quality Scores

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

While the health law's insurance markets are still struggling to get off the ground, the Obama administration is moving ahead with its second year of meting out bonuses and penalties to hospitals based on the quality of their care. This year, there are more losers than winners.

Medicare has raised payment rates to 1,231 hospitals based on two-dozen quality measurements, including surveys of patient satisfaction and — for the first time — death rates. Another 1,451 hospitals are being paid less for each Medicare patient they treat for the year that began Oct. 1.

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Planet Money
10:06 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

What's A Bubble?

Robert Shiller and Eugene Fama shared this year's Nobel Memorial Prize.
AP

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 8:58 am

Robert Shiller was surprised when he got the call telling him he'd won the Nobel Memorial Prize in economics — surprised that he'd won (of course), but also surprised that he was sharing the award with Eugene Fama.

"He and I seem to have very different views," Shiller told me. "It's like we're different religions."

In particular, they have very different views about economic bubbles.

"The word 'bubble' drives me nuts, frankly," Fama told me.

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Environment
10:04 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

A Rancher And A Conservationist Forge An Unlikely Alliance

Trout fishing is big business in Montana, bringing in tens of millions of dollars annually.
Tom Murphy Getty Images/National Geographic

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 4:08 pm

Trout fishing is a magnet that draws people from around the world to places like Ovando, Mont. Just ask the owner of Blackfoot Angler and Supplies, Kathy Schoendoerfer.

"Every state in the nation has been through this little shop in Ovando, Montana, population 50," says Schoendoerfer with a mix of pride and perhaps a little fatigue. "And we've also had everybody from Russia, Latvia. We get a lot of Canadians, France, Finland, Brazil, Scotland, Germany, South Africa. We get a lot of business out here. You know, fly-fishing is huge."

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Around the Nation
10:03 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

With Robberies Up, Oakland Residents Turn To Private Cops

Security officer Steven Long patrols the Sequoyah Hills neighborhood in Oakland, Calif. With city police struggling to control crime, several neighborhoods have hired private security to patrol local streets.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 7:16 am

The city of Oakland, Calif., is in the middle of a robbery epidemic. In response, some residents in several Oakland neighborhoods are taking matters into their own hands, hiring private security companies to patrol their neighborhoods.

Overall, robberies in Oakland are up 24 percent over the past year, with armed robberies up 45 percent. Since the recession dried up local tax revenues, the Oakland Police Department has been hamstrung by the loss of more than 200 officers and can't respond to all the calls it receives for help.

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The Salt
10:01 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Philippines Disaster Rekindles Fight Over Food Aid Rules

A relief worker looks over boxes of aid provided by the U.S. on November 14, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. Proponents of food aid reform say it makes more sense for the U.S. to buy food donations locally than ship them across the globe.
Chris McGrath Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:49 am

Emergency aid, including stocks of food, started arriving this week in cyclone-devastated areas of the Philippines; more is on the way.

The first wave of aid — high-energy biscuits designed to keep people alive when food is scarce — arrived via airlift. Huge shiploads of rice will be needed in the weeks and months to come. And exactly how the U.S. donates of that rice is a flashpoint in a long-running debate in Washington, D.C., about food aid.

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Parallels
9:58 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

In France, Some Ask If Racism Is On The Rise

French Justice Minister Christiane Taubira has been the object of several racist taunts since she defended the government's gay marriage bill in parliament this spring. She is shown here at the Socialist Party's "Universite d'ete" in La Rochelle, in August.
Stephane Mahe Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 4:07 pm

For the past week or so, France has been deep in debate, wondering if there's a resurgence of an old colonial racism, or if people have just become more tolerant of bigots.

The questions stem from a series of race-based taunts against Justice Minister Christiane Taubira, who is black. Many of the statements seem to stem from Taubira's championing of the country's gay marriage legalization, which was signed into law in May.

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Sports
2:06 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

End Of An Era: India's Greatest Cricketer Begins Final Match

Cricket fans holding an Indian national flag cheer in front of a billboard of superstar cricketer Sachin Tendulkar outside a stadium in Mumbai on Thursday. India's favorite son dominated the sport for nearly a quarter of a century. Now, that fabled career is coming to a close.
Danish Siddiqui Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 9:25 pm

Sachin Tendulkar: The very name evokes Indian national pride, and it resounded through Wankhede Stadium Thursday in the cricket superstar's hometown of Mumbai.

That's when Tendulkar took the field for the final test match of his fabled 24-year long career. There are fevered celebrations for the 40-year-old batsman who has dominated the Indian imagination on and off the field, and whose self-effacing demeanor masked a steely determination to win.

The atmosphere was electric as India's favorite son stepped onto the field.

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