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Shots - Health News
7:19 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Kids Are Less Fit Today Than You Were Back Then

There's a reason she's out there all alone. Children worldwide are spending less time on sports and active play and more time with TVs and video games.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 7:44 am

Children around the world are less aerobically fit than their parents were as kids, a decline that researchers say could be setting them up for serious health problems once they're grown up.

Children today take 90 seconds longer to run a mile than kids did 30 years ago, according to data from 28 countries. Children's aerobic fitness has declined by 5 percent since 1975.

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Digital Life
7:10 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Selfies: The World Is More Interesting Because I'm In It

Tell Me More staff and friends pose for "selfies."
NPR

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 8:34 am

If Vincent van Gogh, Frida Kahlo or Romare Bearden were alive today, would they have loved the selfie?

"Selfies are just a way to show that you are part of the world," says NPR's Social Media Project Manager Kate Myers. "Here I am, and the world is more interesting because I'm in it."

The word "selfie" rose to new prominence this week after it was unanimously picked as word of the year by Oxford Dictionaries.

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History
7:09 am
Wed November 20, 2013

JFK And Civil Rights: It's Complicated

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 8:34 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Fifty years ago this week, President John F. Kennedy was murdered in Dallas. It was one of those moments in history where, if you were old enough, you'd remember exactly where you were and what you were doing when you found out. If you've been paying attention to the media at all this week, then you've no doubt run across one or another retrospective.

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Politics
7:09 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Obamacare Crashes President's Polls, Does It Matter?

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 8:34 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, it's been nearly 50 years since President John F. Kennedy was murdered in Dallas. Many people still remember where they were and what they were doing when they heard the news. We asked Congressman John Lewis, a civil rights icon, for his memories of the day. And we'll also look at the bigger picture of John F. Kennedy's role in The Civil Rights Movement. That's coming up.

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The Salt
6:52 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Can A Fish Farm Be Organic? That's Up For Debate

Employees at Pan Fish USA, a salmon fish farm, unload fish feed on Bainbridge Island, Wash.
Ron Wurzer Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 9:34 am

This year, Americans are expected to buy more than $30 billion worth of organic grains, produce, coffee, wine and meats.

Some producers of farmed fish want the chance to get a cut of those profits, and retailers, who can charge a premium price for organic farmed fish, are with them. But an organic label for aquaculture is not coming easy.

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All Tech Considered
6:50 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Russian App Wants E-Book Piracy To End, Happily Ever After

Moscow-based app Bookmate has a subscription e-book service — similar to others on the U.S. market, but with more of a focus on targeting piracy in emerging literary markets.
Courtesty of Bookmate

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 10:55 am

In our Weekly Innovation series, we pick an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Got an innovation you think we should feature? Fill out our form.

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The Two-Way
6:08 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Florida Congressman Taking Leave Of Absence After Cocaine Plea

Rep. Henry "Trey" Radel, R-Fla.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 6:48 pm

Republican Rep. Henry "Trey" Radel of Florida pleaded guilty Wednesday morning to misdemeanor cocaine possession.

That plea in a Washington, D.C., court comes one day after word that Radel had been charged with buying $260 worth of the drug from an undercover Drug Enforcement Administration agent.

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The Two-Way
5:35 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Talk About An Error! We Put 'Mr. Cub' On The White Sox!

Ernie Banks, of THE CHICAGO CUBS, back in his playing days.
AP

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 9:05 am

  • From the NPR Newscast: Our error about Ernie Banks

The words were barely out of our friend and correspondent Ari Shapiro's mouth just after 7:30 a.m. ET this morning when the phones started ringing and emails started arriving.

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The Two-Way
4:21 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Hospitals Say They Had Room To Help Before Virginia Tragedy

The Millboro, Va., home of state Sen. Creigh Deeds. He was attacked there Tuesday — authorities believe by his son Gus. The younger Deeds then may have fatally shot himself, investigators say.
Don Petersen AP

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 3:00 pm

Update at 8 p.m. ET. State IG Opens Investigation

The Washington Post reports that the state's Office of Inspector General has opened an investigation into why the son of Virginia state Sen. R. Creigh Deeds was released from custody the day before the stabbing.

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Parallels
3:19 am
Wed November 20, 2013

World Headlines: Indonesia-Australia Spying Feud Deepens

Reports say Australia spied on Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. On Monday, Indonesia said it was downgrading relations with Australia.
Beawiharta Reuters /Landov

Indonesia, Jakarta Post

Indonesia says it has scaled down its diplomatic relations and its level of cooperation with Australia in the wake of reports that Australia's security services spied on Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and other top officials.

"We have downgraded the level of relations between Indonesia and Australia," Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa said. "Like a faucet, it is turned down."

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The Two-Way
3:13 am
Wed November 20, 2013

White Supremacist Murderer Who Shot Larry Flynt Is Executed

Joseph Paul Franklin in a photo taken in 2012 by the Missouri Department of Corrections.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 5:47 am

Joseph Paul Franklin, the white supremacist who was convicted of eight murders, suspected in as many as 20 others and who shot Hustler publisher Larry Flynt in 1978, was put to death Wednesday in Missouri.

St. Louis Public Radio followed the news overnight as Franklin ran out of legal challenges.

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The Two-Way
2:37 am
Wed November 20, 2013

'I Relied Upon My Faith,' George W. Bush Tells Jay Leno

Former President George W. Bush gave Tonight Show host Jay Leno a painting Tuesday night. Since leaving the White House, Bush has taken up painting.
The Tonight Show with Jay Leno's YouTube channel

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 5:37 am

Making a relatively rare appearance on national TV, former President George W. Bush told Tonight Show host Jay Leno on Tuesday's show that "I relied upon my faith, my family helped a lot and I had a good team around me" while in the White House.

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Pop Culture
2:34 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Monty Python To Reunite For Stage Show

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The rumors are true. Terry Jones confirmed to the BBC that Monty Python will reunite for a stage show. It's been more than three decades since the last proper Python project. The group is beloved on both sides of the Atlantic for its surreal sense of humor, with a touch of slapstick.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL")

GRAHAM CHAPMAN: (as King Arthur) Now, stand aside, worthy adversary.

JOHN CLEESE: (as the Black Knight) 'Tis but a scratch.

Animals
2:34 am
Wed November 20, 2013

National Zoo Creates 'Name The Panda' Contest

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. We've brought our staff into the studio to respond to this sappy story about the baby panda at the National Zoo. The zoo in Washington is holding an online contest to name the panda. The name will be bestowed December 1st when the cub is 100 days old. Meanwhile, we can report the kid went for a walk. Colleagues were told she crawled out of the den all by herself, though she then got tired and went to sleep in the doorway.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: Aw.

The Two-Way
2:01 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Life Is Slowly Returning To Shattered Philippine City

Some people marched in the rain Tuesday in the Philippine city of Tacloban, which was crushed by Typhoon Haiyan.
David Guttenfelder AP
  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Anthony Kuhn, in the Philippines, talks with Steve Inskeep

There was almost nothing left standing or working in the Philippines city of Tacloban after Typhoon Haiyan tore through on Nov. 8.

No electricity. No clean water. No undamaged buildings.

As one official told NPR's Anthony Kuhn, "we have citizens, but no city."

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Around the Nation
11:44 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Early Warnings Saved Lives In Weekend Storms

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 2:34 am

The death toll from Sunday's tornado outbreak across the Midwest stands at eight. Many of those who witnessed the devastation say they're shocked that number isn't higher. Early warnings delivered by text message may have helped limit the casualties.

Politics
11:44 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Obama Concedes Botched Insurance Website Rollout Cost Time

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 2:34 am

The Obama administration is asking for people who've been turned off by the government's problem-plagued insurance website to come back. Officials say the website is working better now, though it's still far from fixed.

Author Interviews
11:44 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Gov. Scott Walker Recounts First-Term Battles In New Book

Gov. Scott Walker speaks during a rally for South Carolina Republican Gov. Nikki Haley on Aug. 26 in Greenville, S.C.
Richard Shiro AP

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 11:54 am

In his new book released this week, Unintimidated: A Governor's Story and a Nation's Challenge, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker reflects on the political firestorm he survived at home in 2012 — and diagnoses what went wrong for the national party.

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All Tech Considered
10:23 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Profit, Not Just Principle, Has Tech Firms Concerned With NSA

Google and five other companies sent a letter last month to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee supporting legislation to reform NSA surveillance programs.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 7:51 am

Along with the privacy advocates and the national security establishment, there is another set of players with strong views on NSA surveillance programs: U.S. tech companies.

Google and five other companies weighed in on the surveillance debate last month, sending a letter to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, supporting legislation to reform National Security Agency surveillance programs.

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Around the Nation
10:18 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

The Art Of Letter-Writing Isn't Lost On These Scribblers

Do you write letters anymore? A few determined people are doing their best to keep them arriving in U.S. mailboxes.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 6:00 am

When was the last time you wrote a letter?

If the answer is "not recently," then you can count yourself among the millions of Americans who just don't write letters anymore. The post office says the average American home receives only one personal letter about every two months.

But there are a few determined people who are doing their best to wreck that average.

"It's becoming a lost art," says Deb Bruzewski.

Every day she curls up on her plaid couch in her home in Auburn, Mich., to write a few of her 60 letters for the week.

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Africa
10:16 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

In Nigeria's Bloody Fight, Who's Gaining The Upper Hand?

Men walk amid rubble after Boko Haram militants raided the town of Benisheik in northeast Nigeria, on Sept. 19. The Islamist group has been waging an insurgency in northern and central Nigeria for the past four years and was recently placed on the U.S. list of terrorist groups.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 5:51 am

For four years, the Islamist militants of Boko Haram have been waging a deadly campaign in northern and central Nigeria, killing thousands of people. In response, the Nigerian military is cracking down on the group, and the United States last week designated Boko Haram a terrorist organization.

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Sweetness And Light
10:00 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

In Basketball, It's Always About What's Next

This year, there are three college players being called "the next LeBron James." Meanwhile, many are speculating about where the first LeBron James, now playing for the Miami Heat, will be next season.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 7:51 am

College basketball seems to get started sooner every year, like puberty in American children. Why does everything have to begin so early now, before you have time to get ready for it?

Things move so fast in college basketball that there are three players this year who are being called "the next LeBron James. " In the NBA, most of the talk is already about where the superstars will be next season.

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The Two-Way
9:47 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

First Satellite Developed By High Schoolers Sent Into Space

NASA's PhoneSat, a 4-by-4-inch CubeSat satellite, will use an Android smartphone as its motherboard. It was among the 29 satellites launched Tuesday from Wallops Island, Va. Another miniature satellite, developed by high school students, also was on board.
Dominic Hart AP

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 7:51 am

The first satellite ever developed by high school students to make it to space is believed to be orbiting Earth after getting a ride aboard a U.S. military rocket Tuesday night from Wallops Island, Va.

Fittingly, perhaps, you can send it a text message.

The satellite, using a voice synthesizer, is built to transform that text into an audio message that can be heard over certain radio frequencies around the globe, and in different languages.

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Parallels
2:30 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Londoners Urged To Cycle, But Commute Can Be Treacherous

Cyclists negotiate rush hour traffic in central London on Nov. 15. Fourteen London cyclists have died so far this year, all in accidents involving heavy goods vehicles.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

London's colorful mayor, Boris Johnson, has made it a priority to get more of his constituents on two wheels. But a series of deaths on the city's roads have shaken cyclists and noncyclists alike.

The number of Londoners cycling to work has more than doubled in the past decade. On some roads, cyclists now make up more than half the rush hour traffic.

And for years, Johnson has been among them. Many think the London mayor has his eye on Prime Minister David Cameron's job.

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The Salt
12:09 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

What's Trending In Food Magazines? Thanksgiving Classics

Three food magazines featured a pumpkin pie finished with a bruleed top for Thanksgiving this year, according to The Bitten Word.
Courtesy of TheBittenWord.com

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 1:53 pm

For many of us, Thanksgiving is just not the same without turkey, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie. In other words, tradition tends to trump trendy.

Yet food magazines always encourage going beyond the usual suspects. And who among us has time to try them out in advance of Thanksgiving?

Zach Patton and Clay Dunn, that's who. They're the married couple behind the food blog The Bitten Word.

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The Two-Way
12:09 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Robert Conley, First Host Of 'All Things Considered,' Dies

Robert Conley celebrated the 40th anniversary of NPR's All Things Considered in the network's Studio 2A.
Coburn Dukehart NPR

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 1:01 pm

Robert Conley, the first host of NPR's All Things Considered, died over the weekend.

It was Conley who on May 3, 1971, set the tone for NPR's flagship newsmagazine. As one of the show's current hosts Robert Siegel explains, Conley established that the program would be different.

To begin that first broadcast, for example, Conley launched into an unscripted, five-minute riff that introduced a 23-minute piece covering a massive anti-war protest in Washington.

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Politics
12:09 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Duncan Apologizes For 'Clumsy' Common Core Remarks

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 12:54 pm

Education Secretary Arne Duncan is in some hot water over remarks he made last week suggesting that opposition to Common Core of Standards was coming from "white suburban moms." He has since pulled back from those remarks.

Around the Nation
12:09 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Iconic Sheep Return To Tucson Mountains, But Is It For Good?

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 12:54 pm

The last desert bighorn sheep that roamed the mountains above Tucson, Ariz., died in the 1990s, the victim of human encroachment, mountain lions, and fire suppression. Now, the iconic Southwest animal — picture the Dodge Ram's grille — is back. A herd of 31 was released Monday morning after being transplanted over the weekend from the Yuma area in the far west of the state. Why would the sheep survive this time?

Shots - Health News
12:06 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Why College Campuses Get Hit By Meningitis Outbreaks

Six students and a visitor have fallen ill with meningitis at Princeton University in New Jersey, shown here in August 2013. All have recovered or are recovering, officials said.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

For the past nine months, Princeton University in New Jersey has been trying to halt an outbreak of bacterial meningitis in its students without success. So it's going to offer students a vaccine that's not yet approved for broader use in the US.

Since bacterial meningitis is a serious infection of the brain and spinal cord that can cause brain damage and death, having it on campus is no small matter.

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The Two-Way
11:11 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Beyond The Caricature: 5 Things To Know About Mayor Rob Ford

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford leaves his office after councilors passed motions Monday to limit his powers.
Chris Young The Canadian Press

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 11:50 am

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford was thrust into the international spotlight after he admitted to smoking crack. Since then, a caricature of the politician has emerged: a bumbling, error-prone addict, whose everyman persona has helped him maintain his popularity in Canada's most populous city.

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