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Sports
10:13 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

An Unreal Sport: Mixing 'Fantasy Life' With Reality

Matthew Berry's new book, "The Fantasy Life," talks about how a made-up game has affected millions of lives, including his own.

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 1:21 am

It's the fourth most popular sport in the United States and more than 30 million people play it in the United States and Canada. Around 13 percent of Americans played it in 2012. There are hundreds of variations across multiple sports, but football is by far the most popular.

And it's pure fantasy.

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The Two-Way
9:56 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Ex-Nixon Adviser Leonard Garment Dies At 89

Leonard Garment, acting White House Counsel, briefs the media at the White House on President Nixon's statement about the Watergate affair in 1973.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:54 am

Former White House adviser Leonard Garment, who had been ill, died Saturday at his Manhattan home, his wife, Suzanne Garment, told The Associated Press yesterday. He was 89.

Garment and Richard Nixon met while working together at a law firm in 1963. He later went to work in the Nixon White House and became White House counsel.

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Music Interviews
9:03 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Robert Randolph Ushers In Steel-Guitar Soul With 'Lickety Split'

Robert Randolph & The Family Band's new album, Lickety Split, is out Tuesday.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 1:22 am

The 33-year-old frontman of Robert Randolph & The Family Band has strong roots in gospel music. As a kid, he grew up attending the House of God church in Orange, N.J. That's where he first played the "sacred steel" guitar, a driving force behind the band's soulful new album, Lickety Split.

In the 1920s, African-American Pentecostal churches began using the steel guitar in place of an organ. From there, it became an instrument that helped usher in a new gospel style.

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The Two-Way
2:22 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

PHOTO: Shark Cruises Florida Beach

Cue the Jaws theme: A hammerhead shark in the shallow Gulf of Mexico waters of Seagrove Beach, Fla., on Monday.
Russell Lewis NPR

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 3:36 pm

While on vacation Monday at Florida's Seagrove Beach, east of Pensacola, NPR's Russell Lewis snapped a photo that's been picking up quite a few retweets. It wasn't "Sharknado II," but does seem to have caught folks' interest.

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It's All Politics
1:13 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Reid's Limited Senate Options Lead To 'Nuclear' Threat

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid warns that if Republicans don't relent on filibusters, they will leave him no choice but to change the chamber's rules.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 2:23 pm

Sen. Harry Reid may sound a tad hypocritical to some for saying he now supports changing Senate rules in order to end the one that says 60 senators must approve before presidential nominations can get up or down votes. This comes only several years after he indicated he opposed changing the requirement to a simple 51-vote majority.

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Race
1:13 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Zimmerman Verdict Feels Personal For Some In Service Sorority

Attorney General Eric Holder greets Alexis Margaret Herman, member of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority, before speaking at the organization's convention.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 2:54 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder looked out over a sea of women in red on Monday and invoked his wife, a member of the influential African-American sorority Delta Sigma Theta. Holder was addressing the sorority's national convention in its centennial year.

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Books News & Features
1:13 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Aparecium! J.K. Rowling Revealed As 'Cuckoo' Mystery Author

Rowling says writing under a pseudonym was a "liberating experience."
Debra Hurford Brown

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 1:54 pm

It's a detective story — about a detective story. The book in question is The Cuckoo's Calling, a debut novel released earlier this year by a former British military man named Robert Galbraith.

The reviews were excellent — especially for a first novel. There was just one hitch: The Cuckoo's Calling wasn't a debut at all. Nor was it by Robert Galbraith. As The Sunday Times revealed this weekend, Galbraith is a pseudonym for one of the best-known writers working today: Harry Potter creator J.K. Rowling.

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The Two-Way
1:05 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Feds Unlikely To Prosecute Zimmerman, Former Prosecutors Say

In Los Angeles on Sunday, demonstrators expressed their anger over the acquittal of George Zimmerman on the charges he faced for the death of Trayvon Martin.
Jim Ruymen UPI /Landov
  • On 'All Things Considered': NPR's Carrie Johnson and Audie Cornish

Looking ahead after the not guilty verdict in the trial of George Zimmerman for the death of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin — a case that reignited the national discussion about race relations:

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Books News & Features
12:54 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

How Scholastic Sells Literacy To Generations Of New Readers

Scholastic started out in 1920 as a four-page magazine written for high school students. Above, an early issue published in September 1922.
Courtesy of Scholastic

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 1:13 pm

Chances are you have had contact with Scholastic Publishing at some point in your life: You might have read their magazines in school, or bought a book at one of their book fairs, or perhaps you've read Harry Potter or The Hunger Games? From its humble beginning as publisher of a magazine for high schoolers, Scholastic has become a $2 billion business and one of the biggest children's book publishers in the world.

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It's All Politics
12:45 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

'Stand Your Ground' Laws Under Scrutiny Post-Zimmerman Verdict

George Zimmerman (right) is congratulated by his defense team Saturday night after being found not guilty of murder in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.
Gary W. Green AP

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:47 am

George Zimmerman's defense team didn't invoke Florida's "stand your ground" defense in winning his acquittal of murder in last year's shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

But the specter of the 2005 law loomed, inescapably, over the proceedings.

It was inevitable that the racially fraught trial would again catapult Florida's law — which extends protections for the use of deadly force far beyond the traditional bounds of one's home — as well as those in 21-plus states with similar self-defense measures into the nation's consciousness.

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The Salt
12:21 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

In Argentina, Coca-Cola Tests Market For 'Green' Coke

Coca-Cola Life, a new product being rolled out in Argentina with a green label, is being marketed as a "natural" and therefore lower-calorie cola.
Coca-Cola

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 1:40 pm

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The Salt
12:18 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

The Secret To Georgian Grilled Meats? Grapevines And Lots Of Wine

Shashlik cooks on a hot grill. Kakheti, the easternmost province in the Republic of Georgia, is known for meats grilled over grapevines, which burn quickly, leaving a heap of finger-sized coals.
Nick Grabowski via Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:27 am

Tucked between Russia and Turkey, the Republic of Georgia is renowned for great food: cheese dishes, pickles, breads and stews. This is a cuisine that you should not miss.

And on summer evenings in the capital, Tbilisi, the air is fragrant with the smells of one of Georgian cookery's highlights: grilled meat, or shashlik.

You can find good shashlik at restaurants with white tablecloths, but the very best in all Tbilisi is said to be at a roadside stop called Mtsvadi Tsalamze. It's an unassuming place with rows of wooden picnic tables in an open yard.

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The Two-Way
12:07 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

New Moon Found Orbiting Neptune, But What To Call It?

Even the Voyager 2 spacecraft missed the new moon when it flew past Neptune in 1989.
NASA

Astronomers have found a new moon orbiting the solar system's outermost planet, Neptune.

The tiny moon, just 12 miles across, was discovered in more than 150 pictures of Neptune taken by the Hubble Space Telescope between 2004 and 2009.

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Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
11:55 am
Mon July 15, 2013

After DOMA Ruling, Binational Gay Couples Face New Issues

Brian Mathers calls his husband, Isidro, in Mexico from his living room in Sioux City, Iowa. Brian and Isidro have been separated for more than a year by immigration laws that did not recognize their marriage.
Durrie Bouscaren NPR

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 1:13 pm

Now that the Supreme Court struck down a key section of the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, same-sex couples can apply for their foreign-born husbands, wives and fiancees to join them in the United States.

There are an estimated 28,000 gay and lesbian binational couples in the country, and for years many have been separated by immigration laws that didn't recognize their marriage.

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The Two-Way
11:25 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Lucky Breakdown: Fans Take Stranded Dave Matthews To Show

Dave Matthews.
Neilson Barnard Getty Images for Syracuse University

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 2:50 pm

Imagine:

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Parallels
11:19 am
Mon July 15, 2013

A Nonstop Tribute To Nelson Mandela

Well-wishers have gathered outside of Nelson Mandela's hospital to offer their support.
Andy Carvin NPR

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 12:44 pm

They have assembled in front of the hospital by the dozens: church groups, families, even a motorcycle club, their engines revving at full throttle. Mothers encouraged their shy children to squeeze through the crowd and place a bouquet of flowers at the base of a makeshift shrine. A member of the crowd conducted an impromptu choir, inviting others to join in and sing a hymn together.

For more than a month now, throngs of well-wishers have gathered outside the Mediclinic Heart Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa, praying for the health of former President Nelson Mandela.

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Shots - Health News
11:07 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Doctors Heed Prescription For Computerized Records

Heather Garris, a custodian of medical records, organizes patients' files at Colorado Springs Internal Medicine in Colorado Springs, Colo.
Barry Gutierrez for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 4:39 am

Uncle Sam wants your doctor to go digital. And the federal government is backing that up with money for practices that start using computerized systems for record keeping.

Nearly half of all physicians in America still rely on paper records for most patient care. Time is running out for those who do to take advantage of federal funds to make the switch. So practices like Colorado Springs Internal Medicine are scrambling to get with the program.

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NPR Story
11:07 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Vacation Horror Stories: Accidental Thief

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 1:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In the 14th century, Geoffrey Chaucer wrote the "Canterbury Tales." It takes places on a pilgrimage to Canterbury Cathedral in England, much like a listener's story we're going to share with you now. It's part of a little summer series we call...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Vacation...

(SOUNDBITE OF SCREAM)

SIEGEL: ...Horror Stories.

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NPR Story
11:07 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Critics: Immigration Reform Takes Jobs Away From Black Workers

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 1:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Hundreds of people from across the country gathered outside the U.S. Capitol today to rally against the Senate's immigration bill. Their big worry: that it would grant amnesty to millions of undocumented immigrants and take jobs away from struggling citizens, especially struggling African-Americans, as NPR's Ailsa Chang reports.

AILSA CHANG, BYLINE: Patty Pitchford does not consider herself racist. She's a black woman from L.A. who says she has learned to accept outsiders.

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NPR Story
11:07 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Electronic Medical Records May Boost Patient Safety

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 1:13 pm

Audie Cornish speaks with Dr. Farzad Mostashari, the national coordinator for health information technology who leads the federal government's efforts to have doctors and hospitals adopt electronic medical records. The goal is to make sure the medical practices are using those systems well, and that those IT systems talk to each other to make medicine more efficient.

All Tech Considered
10:52 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Did Social Media Help Ease Tensions After Zimmerman Verdict?

Trayvon Martin supporters sit in New York City's Times Square on Sunday after marching from a rally for Martin in Manhattan.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:21 am

Calm largely prevailed after a jury acquitted George Zimmerman Saturday night in the killing of Trayvon Martin. Law enforcement and community leaders had prepared for potential unrest, and riots had been feared for months. Slate's Dave Weigel sums up the fears:

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Music News
10:38 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Shout Bands Stir Up Tubular Fervor In Charlotte

Cedric Mangum (left) leads the shout band as a junior member looks on.
Daniel Coston for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 8:42 am

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The Two-Way
10:31 am
Mon July 15, 2013

President George H.W. Bush Honored At White House

Former President George H. W. Bush, in a wheelchair, as he was escorted into the East Room of the White House on Monday by President Obama.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Former President George H.W. Bush, who spent nearly two months in a Houston hospital during late 2012 and early 2013 for treatment of a variety of life-threatening illnesses, was hailed by President Obama at the White House on Monday.

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The Two-Way
9:56 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Juror: 'I Think It Was George Zimmerman's Voice' On 911 Tape

George Zimmerman "probably feared for his life," juror B37 told CNN.
Gary W. Green EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 3:07 am

(We added to this post at 7:30 a.m. ET. July 16)

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Parallels
9:37 am
Mon July 15, 2013

In Venice, Huge Cruise Ships Bring Tourists And Complaints

A massive cruise ships towers over Venice. Some 650 cruise ships now visit the Italian city annually, and critics say they threaten the city's fragile architecture.
Courtesty of the No Big Ships Committee

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 1:13 pm

The fragile architectural treasures of Venice are endangered by rising sea levels, and a growing number of critics now say the city and its canals are at risk from massive cruise ships as big as floating skyscrapers.

On an average day, tens of thousands of passengers lean over the railings of cruise ships that can be 300 yards long and 15 stories high. The tourists peer down at the majestic Doge's Palace as they sail into St. Mark's basin and down the Giudecca canal.

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Shots - Health News
9:28 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Kids Watch TV As Parents Do, Not As They Say

You think it's fun, and they do, too.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 10:28 am

Parents who think their children don't pay attention can take heart. They're doing their best to emulate your bad TV-watching habits.

Parents have been told repeatedly that setting rules and banning TVs in children's bedrooms will help limit TV time. But those much-researched and oft-touted methods don't seem to matter at all, according to a survey.

The only thing that really mattered was parental screen time. The more parents watched, the more their children watched.

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The Two-Way
9:15 am
Mon July 15, 2013

55 Customers Pay For Next Car's Order At Mass. Doughnut Shop

Daniel Kalker DPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 10:17 am

(Think of this as a coffee break from the day's serious stories.)

The standard may have been set back in December when 228 drive-through customers at a Tim Horton's in Winnipeg paid for the order of the folks in the next vehicle.

It was sort of a case of "pay it forward" by paying it backward.

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The Salt
9:02 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Burger King Veggie Burger

You've got your work cut out for you here, mayonnaise.
NPR

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 10:24 am

Burger King has made great reforms in the past few years, in case you haven't noticed. First, the election of its first Burger Prime Minister freed its citizens from the absolute monarchy that had ruled the restaurant for decades. Second, it created a veggie burger.

Eva: I wonder where they got the vegetarian pink slime.

Miles: I do have to hand it to Burger King, its food-shame substitute feels almost exactly like the real thing.

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The Salt
8:52 am
Mon July 15, 2013

The Dog Days Of Summer Lead Drinkers To Shandy

A shandy in the summertime
Holly Clark Photo courtesy of Holly Clark Photography

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 2:34 pm

A beer cocktail quaffed around the world for centuries is quickly becoming America's "it" drink of the summer: shandy.

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The Two-Way
8:47 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Holder: Trayvon Martin Case Is A Chance For 'Difficult Dialogue'

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 9:59 am

Speaking at a luncheon for the Delta Sigma Theta sorority in Washington, D.C., Attorney General Eric Holder said he shared concerns about the "tragic, unnecessary shooting death of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., last year."

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