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Religion
12:56 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

To Pastor, Afterlife Is Where We 'Learn To Live Together'

Detail of the central compartment of The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb, completed in 1432 by Jan van Eyck, where pilgrims gather to pay homage to the lamb of God. Many art historians interpret the painting's fountain as a symbol of eternal life.
DEA Picture Library De Agostini/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:39 am

A majority of Americans from all walks of life believe in life after death. Yet conversations about the afterlife — from what it might look and feel like to who else one may find there — often remain highly personal ones, shared with family members, clergy or others who share one's faith.

To better understand how many Americans conceive of the afterlife, All Things Considered has spoken with leaders from different faith traditions on their views on life after death.

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The Government Shutdown
12:56 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Even Antarctica Feels Effects Of The Government Shutdown

A helicopter is unloaded from an LC-130 in Antarctica last December. Researchers on this mission were studying the Pine Island Glacier, one of the fastest-receding glaciers on the continent.
August Allen National Science Foundation

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 1:50 pm

It looks like even Antarctica isn't far away enough to avoid getting caught up in the government shutdown.

That's because it's currently springtime there, and scientists who study this remote, rugged continent are poised to take advantage of the few months when there's enough daylight and it's warm enough to work. Advance teams have already started working to get things set up and ready for the researchers, who usually begin heading south right about now.

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Politics
12:56 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Raids Project Presidential Power Amid Shutdown's Gridlock

President Obama arrives to speak about the government shutdown at the Federal Emergency Management Agency's National Response Coordination Center on Monday.
Shawn Thew-Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 1:50 pm

The American system of government was built on gridlock. Yet even by that standard, this past week has demonstrated new levels of immobility.

So the special forces operations carried out in Libya and Somalia over the weekend were a bracing change. President Obama decided to do something — and it happened.

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Economy
12:56 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

In A Debt Crisis, U.S. May Have To Decide Payment Priorities

House Republicans have proposed directing the Treasury Department to pay bondholders first if there is not enough money available to pay all the nation's debts.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 7:02 am

The government is just 10 days away from defaulting on its debt. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew has said that by Oct. 17, the department will likely have less money on hand than it needs to pay all its bills.

"The reality is that if we run out of cash to pay our bills, there is no option that permits us to pay all of our bills on time, which means that a failure of Congress to act would for the first time put us in a place where we're defaulting on our obligations as a government," Lew said on NBC's Meet The Press on Sunday.

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It's All Politics
12:21 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

GOP Governors Chart Different Paths On Shutdown

Republican South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley announces her candidacy for a second term in August, with South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott (from left), Govs. Rick Perry of Texas, Scott Walker of Wisconsin, and Bobby Jindal of Louisiana.
Richard Shiro AP

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:23 am

The federal government shutdown has given governors across the country an opportunity to take part in one of their favorite pastimes: scolding Washington.

Among Republicans, though, there appears to be some disagreement over exactly who's to blame for the latest budget impasse.

One camp of GOP governors — often those in blue states or with national ambitions (if not both) — has largely chastised all parties involved. They're eager to distance themselves from Washington and portray themselves as results-oriented "outsiders."

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The Two-Way
11:53 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Malala Yousafzai: 'I Believe In Peace; I Believe In Mercy'

Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old Pakistani advocate for girls education who was shot in the head by the Taliban, attends a conversation with the United Nations Secretary General Ban-ki Moon and other youth delegates.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

It's been a year since Taliban militants shot Malala Yousafzai in the head for her campaign promoting the right of girls to go to school.

It was a heartbreaking case that captured the globe and luckily — and against the odds — the 16-year-old has made a full recovery that culminated in a stunning speech at the United Nations in July.

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Sports
11:20 am
Mon October 7, 2013

His Dodgers In The Playoffs, A Legendary Announcer Keeps On

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 1:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

For the first time in four years, the Los Angeles Dodgers are in the playoffs. They have plenty of stars on the field, but the most famous and beloved member of the organization is in the radio booth. Eighty-five-year-old Vin Scully has been broadcasting games for 64 years. Ben Bergman of member station KPCC got a rare interview with Scully, who says he'll keep going for at least another year.

VIN SCULLY: It's time for Dodger baseball.

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Pop Culture
11:20 am
Mon October 7, 2013

George R.R. Martin, Author And ... Movie-Theater Guy?

George R.R. Martin prepares to introduce author Neil Gaiman and performer Amanda Palmer at charity benefit at his newly renovated Jean Cocteau cinema in Santa Fe, N.M., on Sept. 29. Reopening the old movie house has been a passion project for the Game of Thrones author — but for some of his fans, it's one more distraction that's come between them and Martin's unfinished epic.
Grayson Schaffer for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:21 am

George R.R. Martin's hit fiction series A Song of Ice and Fire has sold more than 25 million copies and sparked an HBO adaptation, Game of Thrones, that won two Emmys in 2013, bringing its total to 10.

But many fans are grumbling that Martin hasn't been spending enough time of late in his mythical kingdom of Westeros and its surroundings. On the list of things Martin is doing instead of writing the next Game of Thrones book? Reviewing the latest episodes of Breaking Bad, editing a sci-fi series and writing a novella.

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Around the Nation
11:20 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Deepwater Horizon Trial Enters Second Phase

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 1:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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The Two-Way
11:16 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Argentina's Kirchner To Have Surgery For Brain Hematoma

Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner will undergo surgery to relieve a hematoma on her brain Tuesday. She is seen here last month, at the U.N. General Assembly.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 12:07 pm

Days after doctors said Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner must take a month off from work to recover from a brain hematoma, reports now indicate that she'll undergo surgery to relieve the condition Tuesday.

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Heavy Rotation
10:29 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

World Cafe host David Dye." href="/post/heavy-rotation-10-songs-public-radio-cant-stop-playing-2" class="noexit lightbox">
Bill Callahan's "Small Plane" is a favorite of World Cafe host David Dye.
Hanly Banks Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 8:04 am

It's time to share what 10 of our favorite public radio personalities have been loving lately. Here's a list of this month's Heavy Rotation panelists:

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The Two-Way
10:06 am
Mon October 7, 2013

China Cautions U.S. Over Debt Ceiling Fight

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 12:56 pm

China — which holds nearly $1.3 trillion in U.S. securities (pdf) — is asking the U.S. to get its finances in order and not allow a political stalemate to cause the country to default on its obligations for the first time in history.

The United States is expected to run out of money by Oct. 17, so the Treasury needs Congress to extend its credit limit before then. As has happened before, the House and Senate are at odds and the prospects of a compromise look shaky.

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Parallels
9:54 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Here's Why The Navy Is Holding A Terror Suspect At Sea

Libyan protesters burn a replica of the U.S. flag on Monday during a demonstration against the capture of Abu Anas al-Libi. U.S. forces seized him Saturday in the Libyan capital Tripoli. He is accused of involvement in two U.S. embassy bombings in Africa in 1998 and is being held on a U.S. Navy ship in the Mediterranean Sea.
Esam OmranAl-Fetori Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 4:45 am

After seizing terror suspect Abu Anas al-Libi in the Libyan capital, Tripoli, U.S. forces took him to a ship in the Mediterranean where he could be interrogated for weeks or even months to come.

Why a ship?

In short, this allows the U.S. to hold and question al-Libi about his alleged role in a pair of 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings in Africa without putting him in the U.S. civilian court system, which could limit or halt efforts to interrogate him.

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The Two-Way
9:48 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Taliban Vows To Try Again To Kill Pakistani Teen

Malala Yousafzai speaks after receiving the leadership in civil society award at the annual Clinton Global Initiative award ceremony in New York last month.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenager who spent months recovering after being shot in the head by the Taliban for championing the right of girls to education, says the way forward is to talk to the militants who attacked her.

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The Two-Way
9:34 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Justice Scalia Talks Satan, 'Seinfeld' And Gays

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia speaks during an event at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 11:02 am

It's the first Monday in October, which means the Supreme Court is back in business after its long summer break.

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The Salt
8:43 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Limited Edition Candy Corn Oreo

Signed, sealed, delivered, it's gross.
NPR

Nabisco has released a special edition of its classic sandwich cookie, just in time for Halloween: Oreos with candy corn filling. This beats the July 4 special, the Oreo filled with a live M-80.

Eva: I didn't even know candy corn and Oreos were dating ... now they have a kid?!

Robert: When I eat regular Oreos, I want a glass of milk. When I eat these, I want a glass of poison.

(Weirdly, the filling lacks the waxy quality of candy corn, which Robert says is because it doesn't have any quality at all.)

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The Two-Way
8:08 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Fan's Video Captures Scary Scene Of Franchitti's IndyCar Crash

A safety team works to remove Dario Franchitti from his car after a high-speed crash at the IndyCar Grand Prix of Houston Sunday. The driver was hospitalized with a fractured spine and other injuries.
Juan DeLeon AP

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 9:27 am

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Parallels
8:02 am
Mon October 7, 2013

A Chemical Attack, And Now Food Shortages In Syrian Town

A woman carries a sack of food aid on her head in Ghouta, Syria, earlier this month.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 4:46 am

The author is a Syrian citizen in Damascus who is not being further identified for safety reasons.

The boy on the bicycle wasn't old enough to have facial hair. His feet barely reached the ground as he stopped and moved, circling the soldier manning the government checkpoint in east Ghouta, a suburb of Damascus.

"Please, just one bag of bread," the boy, lips quivering, said to the soldier. "Just one."

"I told you, no. No means no, young man," the soldier replied. "No food is allowed inside." He seemed somewhat pained at having to deprive a child of food.

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Performing Arts
7:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

The Fat Lady Sings For New York City Opera

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. They call it The People's Opera, but after this month, the New York City Opera will exist only in the history books. The renowned company is closing after 70 years. The New York City Opera failed to raise the $7 million it needed to cover its debts and will file for bankruptcy protection.

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Arts & Life
7:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

An Artist's Story Of The Arab Spring

Upheaval in countries like Egypt and Syria is often discussed in political terms, but how do artists see it? Guest host Celeste Headlee talks about arts and the Arab Spring with Egyptian-American poet Yahia Lababidi and Syrian-American doctor Dr. Zaher Sahloul.

World
7:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Has The US Forgotten Egypt?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. We're going to spend some time talking now about Egypt, where more than 50 people were killed over the weekend in clashes between the military and supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi. In a moment, we'll speak to an Egyptian-American who has written poetry inspired by the unrest there.

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Politics
7:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Govt. Shutdown: Does The Minority Rule?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Coming up, diplomats around the world continue to pay close attention to the events in Syria and Iran, but one scholar explains why we shouldn't forget about Egypt. That's in a few minutes.

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Code Switch
6:42 am
Mon October 7, 2013

How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines

The "boondocks" or "boonies" refers to places that are in the middle of nowhere. But few people know that the phrase was made mainstream by a fatal military training accident.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 10:16 am

"Ugh, I have to visit my aunt out in the boondocks this weekend."

How often have you said or heard something similar? For more than half a century, Americans have used the phrase "the boondocks" or "the boonies" to indicate that a place was in the middle of nowhere. However, few people realize that the phrase is a relic of American military occupation in the Philippines, and that it was later brought to mainstream attention because of a now largely forgotten, fatal training accident on Parris Island.

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Shots - Health News
6:25 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Nobel Winners Decoded How Neurons And Cells Talk To Each Other

From left: Randy Schekman, Thomas Suedhof and James Rothman shared the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 7:01 am

The three scientists who shared this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine all made discoveries that illuminate how the body's cells communicate.

The research has sweeping implications for our understanding of how nerves in the brain transmit signals, how the immune system attacks pathogens and how hormones, like insulin, get into the bloodstream.

Bioengineers have already harnessed the discoveries to manufacture new vaccines and improve the quality of insulin for diabetics.

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The Two-Way
5:06 am
Mon October 7, 2013

In Blow To Boeing, JAL Places Nearly $10 Billion Airbus Order

An Airbus A350-900 takes off from an airport in Toulouse, France, on its maiden flight. Japan Airlines reportedly has ordered 18 A350-900s and 13 A350-1000s.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 11:02 am

Japan Airlines is buying $9.5 billion worth of new jetliners from Airbus, placing its first-ever order with the European plane-maker for 31 A350s to replace the carrier's aging fleet of Boeing 777s.

The airline's president, Yoshiharu Ueki, said the order was unrelated to Boeing's problems with the 787, but the huge order is seen as a major coup for the Toulouse, France-based manufacturer at the expense of its American rival.

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The Two-Way
4:52 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Rabbi Ovadia Yosef, A 'Kingmaker' In Israeli Politics, Dies

Followers of Rabbi Ovadia Yosef mourn outside his home in Jerusalem on Monday. The rabbi, who transformed his downtrodden community into a powerful force in Israeli politics, died at age 93.
Sebastian Scheiner AP

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 4:49 am

Israel is mourning a legendary political and spiritual figure, after Rabbi Ovadia Yosef died in Jerusalem on Monday. He was 93.

The longtime spiritual leader of Sephardic Jews, Yosef also was a founder of Shas, the ultra-Orthodox political party that has played crucial roles in governing coalitions. The daily Haaretz called him a "kingmaker of Israeli politics and Jewish law."

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The Two-Way
3:58 am
Mon October 7, 2013

No End In Sight: Shutdown Showdown Enters Week 2

Texas Republican Sen. John Cornyn speaks on CBS's Face the Nation on Sunday. Cornyn said the partial federal government shutdown cannot end unless President Obama sits down with congressional Republicans.
Chris Usher AP

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 7:26 am

The second week of the shutdown is, so far, looking a lot like Week 1. Even so, here are a few data points that might be worth your attention:

U.S. civilian defense workers heading back to work on Monday

As The Two-Way's Bill Chappell reported earlier, the Department of Defense is ordering most of its furloughed civilian employees — amounting to about 400,000 workers — back to work.

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It's All Politics
3:04 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Monday Morning Political Mix

People who for years had planned to be boating down the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon right about now instead found themselves on Saturday camping in a parking lot because of the government shutdown.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 4:12 am

Good Monday morning, fellow political junkies. The partial shutdown of the government enters its second week and on Day 7 of the crisis neither side appears to have softened its position.

At least furloughed federal workers got the good news over the weekend that Congress had approved giving them backpay for the time they are locked out of their jobs.

Here are some of the more interesting news items with greater or lesser political import that caught my eye this morning.

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Europe
2:28 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Bear Breaks Into Siberian Cottage Devours Pot Of Borscht

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. This time it was the bear who broke in. It seemed no one was at home so a Russian bear decided to taste what was on the stove of a Siberian country cottage. Not too hot, not too cold, the pot of borscht was just right. The bear devoured the entire pot of the beet root soup before the owners spotted him, called the police, and the bear, like Goldilocks before him, fled into the forest. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
2:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

U.S. Raids In Libya And Somalia Target Al-Qaida Network

This image from the FBI website shows Abu Anas al-Libi, who was captured in a U.S. operation on Saturday in Libya.
AP

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 9:00 am

More details are emerging after a pair of U.S. commando raids over the weekend that targeted alleged terrorists in Libya and Somalia.

In Libya, Abu Anas al-Libi, a top al-Qaida operative accused by Washington of involvement in the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, was snatched from a street in the capital, Tripoli, in an operation on Saturday.

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