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6:09 am
Mon September 30, 2013

A History Of Love Gone Wrong, All In One Croatian Museum

At the Museum of Broken Relationships in Zagreb, Croatia, each item is accompanied by a story from the donor on how a romance fell apart.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 4:50 am

I confess I'm not much of a museum tourist. On a recent visit to Croatia's capital, Zagreb, I strolled past three museums without feeling any urge to step inside. Then I came across one I just couldn't ignore: the Museum of Broken Relationships.

"It's a collection of objects donated by people who have broken up," says Drazen Grubisic, a co-owner of the museum. "Each item has an accompanying story."

Some are amusing, others sarcastic and a few are just plain heartbreaking.

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The Two-Way
6:01 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Canada To Launch Billion-Dollar Marijuana Free Market This Week

A new free market for medical marijuana in Canada will replace small growers with large-scale indoor farms.
Menahem Kahana AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 8:53 am

Canada is ushering in what it projects to be a $1.3 billion medical marijuana free market this week, as it replaces small and homegrown pot production with quality-controlled marijuana produced by large farms. The market could eventually serve up to 450,000 Canadians, according to government estimates.

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The Two-Way
5:11 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Baseball's Playoffs Start And So Does A-Rod's Suspension Appeal

New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez.
Kathy Willens AP

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 6:22 am

After a dramatic finish to the regular season that included a no-hitter on the final day and a tie that will force a special elimination game Monday night, Major League Baseball is set to start its playoffs.

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Shots - Health News
4:58 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Vaccine Refusals Fueled California's Whooping Cough Epidemic

A student gets vaccinated against pertussis at a Los Angeles middle school in 2012. The state required that students be immunized to halt an epidemic of whooping cough.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 6:22 am

When the whooping cough vaccine was invented in the 1940s, doctors thought they had finally licked the illness, which is especially dangerous for babies. But then it came roaring back.

In 2010, a whooping cough outbreak in California sickened 9,120 people, more than in any year since 1947. Ten infants died; babies are too young to be vaccinated.

Public health officials suspected that the increased numbers of parents who refused to vaccinate their children played a role, but they couldn't be sure.

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The Two-Way
4:12 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Multiple Car Bombs Wreak Havoc In Baghdad, Killing Dozens

Iraqis look at the site of a car bomb attack in Baghdad, where at least 10 car bombs were detonated during the city's rush hour Monday.
Khalid Mohammed AP

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 8:30 am

A spate of car bombs exploded during Baghdad's morning rush hour Monday, killing at least 47 people and wounding dozens more. Most of the bombs struck areas with large Shiite populations; various news agencies are reporting that from nine to 14 separate bombs were detonated.

Many of the car bombs resulted in far more injuries than deaths. But at least one explosion was especially deadly. According to the BBC and Reuters, an attack in Baghdad's Sadr City district killed at least seven people.

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The Two-Way
3:55 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Remembering Lee Thornton, Who Broke Barriers In Journalism

Lee Thornton.
University of Maryland / Philip Merrill College of Journalism

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 6:08 am

The news media has lost another trailblazer.

Two months after the death of Helen Thomas, another woman who broke important barriers in Washington's press corps has passed away.

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The Two-Way
3:00 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Popes John Paul II, John XXIII To Become Saints Next April

Pope John Paul II in 1982
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 6:06 am

The Vatican said Monday that it has set April 27, 2014, as the date that popes John Paul II and John XXIII will be "raised to sainthood."

Their canonization will come on "the Second Sunday of Easter and Divine Mercy," the Holy See added.

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Around the Nation
2:44 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Wis. Rep. Moves To Legalize Plastic Duck Races

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
2:44 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Beer Promotion Fills Seats For Jaguar's Game

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

These are not the best of times for football fans in Jacksonville, Florida. The Jaguars are one of the worst teams in the NFL, regularly losing by double digits. Yesterday, the home stadium ran a promotion: free beer with a ticket. The turnout was decent. Eighty-nine percent of the stadium's seats were sold. Maybe people just needed some extra incentive to come watch some football. Or maybe they needed that beer to forget about the score: Indianapolis Colts 37, Jaguars 3.

The Two-Way
2:13 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Are You Ready For Some Shutdown? Here's Monday's Schedule

Inside the Capitol, lawmakers are battling over health care and the budget. Outside, many government services may come to a stop at midnight.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 6:37 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Ailsa Chang on what's expected to happen Monday
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Scott Horsley on the history of shutdowns

We probably don't need to tell you that it's almost certain there will be a partial shutdown of the federal government just after midnight Monday.

But we do want to lay out the day's agenda.

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Around the Nation
1:15 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Paris, Texas, May Fulfill Years-Old City Services Promise

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 2:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And now let's go from Paris, France to another Paris. This one in Texas, some 90 miles northeast of Dallas.

PEGGY WORTHY WILSON: Been here my whole life and this is my own place.

INSKEEP: Peggy Worthy Wilson owns about 15 acres in Paris.

WILSON: I have a grandson and he has cattle and we plant grass. We have two llamas and we have chickens.

(LAUGHTER)

WILSON: So we still have the country feeling.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Europe
1:15 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Greece Cracks Down On Violent Golden Dawn Party

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 2:44 am

Over the weekend, Greek police arrested around two dozen party leaders, including members of parliament, from the Golden Dawn party — one of Europe's most violent political parties. Charges include murder and blackmail.

Environment
12:28 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Forum Discusses Arctic Oil And Gas Searches

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 9:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On the first Monday of the rest of your life, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Climate change is melting ice in the Arctic. And that is opening up the top of the world to drilling, shipping traffic, and also concerns about the environment. Earlier this month, Greenpeace activists were arrested trying to board an oil platform that's owned by Russia's state gas company.

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Politics
11:42 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Clock Keeps Ticking Toward Government Shutdown

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 2:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The brinksmanship is familiar, but nobody quite knows how the fight over a government shutdown will end.

GREENE: Congress has to pass a bill by midnight to keep the government in full operation. House Republicans demanded that all funds be denied to Obamacare in exchange for keeping the government running 45 days. The Senate overwhelmingly said no.

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Sports
11:34 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Yankees Say Goodbye To Rivera And His Cut Fastball

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 2:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK, the baseball post-season is not quite settled. The Texas Rangers and Tampa Bay Rays will fight for the final playoff spot in a game tonight. The post-season of the New York Yankees is settled: There is not one. The Yankees failed to make it into the playoffs for only the second time in the last 19 years. And that means one of the most successful careers in baseball history has ended. Mariano Rivera has officially pitched his last game. And with that exit, NPR's Mike Pesca has this remembrance of his signature pitch: the cut fastball.

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Analysis
11:34 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

House, Senate Disagree On How To Keep Government Open

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 2:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Let's try to understand a congressional boxing match that, for all we know, could continue beyond the final bell.

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Shots - Health News
10:37 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Insurance Exchange 101: Here's What You Need To Know

The audience concentrates on a presentation by Kansas Insurance Commissioner Sandy Praeger's office about the federal health care overhaul at the University of Kansas satellite campus in Overland Park, Kan., earlier this month.
John Hanna AP

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 4:36 am

The Affordable Care Act has been through two years of legislative wrangling, a presidential election and a Supreme Court test that took it to the brink.

Now, after yet another round of debate and argument, major pieces of the federal health law are expected to kick in Tuesday.

If all goes as planned, people who don't have insurance or who buy it on their own will be able to shop online or at various locations in their communities for coverage that will take effect Jan. 1.

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Planet Money
10:36 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

One Key Thing No One Knows About Obamacare

Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 2:44 am

Tuesday is a big day for Obamacare. The online marketplaces where people can shop for health insurance are supposed to open for business.

No one really knows who is going to sign up — not the Obama administration, not the insurance industry, not the president's critics. Yet the success of the law hangs on this question: Will the right mix of people sign up? In particular, will healthy people buy health insurance?

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Asia
10:35 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Asian Investors Find Hot Market In U.S. Properties

In May, a large piece of the General Motors Building in Manhattan was purchased by a Chinese real estate developer.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 4:51 am

The General Motors Building in Manhattan is a majestic 50-story, white marble structure that takes up one full city block. This is prime New York City real estate. A flagship Apple store sits on the ground floor, across the street is the Plaza Hotel, and on another corner is an entrance to Central Park.

The GM building is considered one of the most valuable office towers in the U.S. In May, a large piece of it was purchased by a Chinese real estate developer.

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The Salt
10:35 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Kombucha: Magical Health Elixir Or Just Funky Tea?

Kombucha made by artisan tea brewer Bill Bond in Akron, Ohio, comes in an array of flavors, such as lemongrass, ginger, blueberry and watermelon.
Peggy Turbett The Plain Dealer /Landov

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 7:34 am

Chances are, you've seen it in your local grocery store. Maybe you've even mustered the courage to taste it — or at least take a whiff.

Once mostly a product of health food stores and hippies' kitchens, kombucha tea is now commercially available in many major grocery stores.

And people aren't necessarily scooping it up for its flavor. Its taste has been described as somewhere between vinegar soda and carbonated apple cider.

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The Salt
10:34 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

To Get The Benefits Of Olive Oil, Fresh May Be Best

Experts say lots of factors determine how quickly an oil deteriorates — from the variety of the olives, to how the oil is produced and stored.
Matthias Schrader AP

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 1:17 pm

The Mediterranean diet is a pattern of eating that lately has become a darling of medical researchers. It includes vegetables and grains, not so much meat and, of course, generous portions of olive oil.

Mary Flynn, an associate professor of medicine at Brown University, says the evidence that olive oil is good for your heart has never been more clear. "Olive oil is a very healthy food," she says. "I consider it more medicine than food."

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Governing
10:32 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

A Short History Of Government Shutdowns

With President Jimmy Carter watching, Benjamin Civiletti is sworn in by Chief Justice Warren Burger as U.S. attorney general on Aug. 16, 1979. The following year, Civiletti issued a legal opinion saying that federal work cannot go on until Congress agrees to pay for it.
AP

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 4:54 am

Drawn-out fights over spending bills are nothing new for Congress. But that's where the fights used to stay: in Congress. The rest of the country didn't have to pay much attention to countdown clocks and all this drama.

"In the '60s and '70s down until 1980, it was not taken that seriously at all," says Charles Tiefer, a former legal adviser to the House of Representatives, who now teaches at the University of Baltimore Law School. In the old days, he says, when lawmakers reached a budget stalemate, the federal workforce just went about its business.

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Business
10:29 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Chicago's Privatized Parking Meters Sour Airport Lease Deal

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 2:47 am

Close to 19 million passengers come through Chicago's Midway Airport each year, and many will spend a lot of cash here — on food, drinks, books, gum, parking and rental cars — not to mention the landing fees and gate fees paid by airlines.

There are a lot of opportunities to make money in a bustling hub airport like this, and the city was hoping to cash in.

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The Two-Way
7:03 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Justice Department Sues North Carolina Over Voter ID Law

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 12:16 pm

(This post was updated at 5 p.m.)

The Justice Department is suing North Carolina over that state's restrictive new voting law. The lawsuit takes aim at provisions that limit early voting periods and require a government photo ID as an illegal form of discrimination against minorities at the ballot box.

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Environment
1:22 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Is Living With Extreme Wildfires The New Normal?

A house destroyed by a wildfire in Yarnell, Ariz. Experts say increasing expansion into wildfire-prone areas has created new challenges for firefighters unequipped to protect houses and structures.
Andy Tobin AP

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 12:02 pm

It has been a deadly year for the people who fight wildfires. In total, 32 people have lost their lives fighting fires in 2013; the highest number in nearly 20 years, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.

Just one incident accounts for most of those deaths, the Yarnell Hill fire in Arizona. In June, the blaze blasted through a firefighting crew known as the Granite Mountain Hotshots; 19 of the 20 men died.

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Asia
12:21 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Truth Or Propaganda? Finding Real Stories In North Korea

Children mobilized for the annual mass games in Pyongyang act as pixels, portraying a happy patriot in uniform.
David Guttenfelder National Geographic

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 7:21 am

North Korea remains one of the most closed places in the world. And that makes Tim Sullivan kind of a rarity: As the Asia correspondent for the Associated Press, he's spent about six weeks in the country over the course of two trips.

In addition to his stories for AP, Sullivan also wrote an article entitled "The Real North Korea" that's in the October issue of National Geographic.

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Around the Nation
12:02 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Painful History Buried At Shuttered Vermont Institution

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 1:31 pm

When Gary Wade first started working at Vermont's state institution for people with developmental disabilities, it was already on its way out. The Brandon Training School had been in operation since 1915.

Before it closed for good in 1993, Wade was sorting through the paperwork and found letters written during the 1940s and '50s. One of his favorite clients, Flossie Howe, was asking to leave. "I don't feel like I belong here. I think I have a job in Pittsford, " Flossie wrote.

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Music Interviews
12:02 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Vijay Iyer On Learning From War

For three years, jazz musician Vijay Iyer has worked with poet and performer Mike Ladd to set the words of war veterans to music. The resulting album, released earlier this month, is called Holding It Down: The Veterans' Dreams Project.
Jimmy Katz Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 1:30 pm

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Author Interviews
12:02 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

How Two Brothers Waged A 'Secret World War' In The 1950s

Courtesy of Times Books

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 1:30 pm

John Foster Dulles and Allen Dulles were the forefathers of using covert operations to upset foreign governments — with the aim of overthrow.

They learned the reach of American power abroad when they were partners at an influential New York law firm. Later, with John Foster Dulles serving as secretary of state and Allen Dulles as CIA chief, they shared power in the President Dwight Eisenhower's administration.

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The Two-Way
10:49 am
Sun September 29, 2013

In Kenya, Questions Arise Over Reported Warnings Of Attack

The upper parking lot entrance to the Westgate Mall is seen above vehicles that plunged during the collapse of the upper level. Kenyan officials are urging patience with the pace of the flow of information about the attack.
Ben Curtis AP

Kenyan authorities say they've made another arrest in the deadly attack on an upscale mall that shocked Nairobi last week. But officials are also facing questions over reports of intelligence that may have given warnings about the attack, which ended with at least 67 deaths.

According to the Kenyan Red Cross's last update which came on Friday, 59 people who are believed to have been in the mall remain unaccounted for.

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