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11:39 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

D.C. Mayor Vetoes Wage Bill Targeting Large Retailers

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 12:38 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

California is seeing its first increase in the state's minimum wage in six years - a 25 percent increase this time around. Yesterday, the state legislature voted to raise the minimum wage to $10 an hour by 2016. Governor Jerry Brown is expected to sign that bill into law.

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Science
10:07 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Living Gears Help This Bug Jump

An image from an electron microscope of the back legs of a planthopper insect.
Gregory Sutton

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 8:21 am

Greg Sutton was closely inspecting the back legs of a planthopper nymph — a small green, flightless insect — when he noticed something odd.

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Environment
10:06 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

'Rivers On Rolaids': How Acid Rain Is Changing Waterways

Gwynns Falls runs beneath Interstate 95 at Carroll Park in Baltimore. The chemistry of this river, like many across the country, is changing.
Courtesy of Sujay Kaushal

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 5:47 am

Something peculiar is happening to rivers and streams in large parts of the United States — the water's chemistry is changing. Scientists have found dozens of waterways that are becoming more alkaline. Alkaline is the opposite of acidic — think baking soda or Rolaids.

Research published in the current issue of Environmental Science and Technology shows this trend to be surprisingly widespread, with possibly harmful consequences.

What's especially odd about the finding is its cause: It seems that acid rain actually has been causing waterways to grow more alkaline.

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The Salt
10:05 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

The Secret To Making It Through A Yom Kippur Fast? Kreplach

Kreplach, a special Jewish holiday dish that can be made essentially out of leftovers.
Courtesy of Caren Alpert

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 7:11 am

To mark the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, the day of atonement, Jews fast from sundown to sundown. But before the sun sets, friends and family gather to enjoy one final meal. And for the Jews of Eastern Europe, that meal traditionally includes kreplach.

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Shots - Health News
10:03 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Treating Kids' Cancer With Science And A Pocket Full Of Hope

Dr. Jim Olson meets with Carver Faull at Seattle Children's Hospital in August. Carver, now 12, had surgery to remove a brain tumor in 2012.
Matthew Ryan Williams for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 5:02 am

Try to imagine someone who is supremely calm while at the same time bursting with energy, and you've got a pretty good idea of what Jim Olson is like.

He's a cancer researcher, physician, cyclist, kayaker and cook, not always in that order. He approaches each activity with incredible passion.

But to really understand Olson, you have to watch him in action with patients.

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StoryCorps
10:02 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

How One Man Continues To 'Just Pass It On'

Thomas Weller, 65, says he's been called an angel more times than he can count.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 2:44 am

Thomas Weller would have died in a snow bank in 1964 had a stranger not helped him. Weller, 65, has been helping strangers in the same way ever since.

"I've been called the Lone Ranger. And I've been called an angel more times than I can count," he says. "But, I'm no angel! When you help somebody else, you help yourself. And, it's ... real gratifying."

Click on the audio link above to hear Weller's story.

Audio produced for Morning Edition by Jasmyn Belcher.

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The Record
7:23 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

'90s Nostalgia Revisited: 6 Musicians We Miss

P.M. Dawn, sometime in the '90s.
Mick Hutson Redferns

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 3:11 am

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The U.S. Response To Syria
1:30 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Frenemies Forever: Why Putin And Obama Can't Get Along

Russia's President Vladimir Putin welcomes President Obama at the start of the G-20 summit on Sept. 5 in St. Petersburg. Russia.
Eric Feferburg AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 2:09 pm

Leaders who respect each other and have a good relationship don't mock each other.

Barack Obama and Vladimir Putin do not have a good relationship.

Just as Russia and the U.S. are attempting to work out a delicate deal to rid Syria of chemical weapons, the Russian president published an op-ed in The New York Times thumbing his nose at President Obama.

Reactions to the affront have been strong.

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The Salt
12:48 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

No Bitter Pill: Doctors Prescribe Fruits And Veggies

Johanna Terron, 14, has lost over 20 pounds over the past year. She receives a prescription for fruits and vegetables from her pediatrician at Lincoln Hospital.
Allison Aubrey NPR

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 10:21 am

It was the Greeks who first counseled to let food be thy medicine. And, it seems, some doctors are taking this age-old advice to heart.

In New York City physicians are writing prescriptions for fresh fruits and vegetables. That's right, 'scripts for produce.

If you listen to my story on All Things Considered, you'll hear that the program is the creation of Wholesome Wave, a nonprofit that connects low-income people with local produce.

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Space
12:44 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

See Ya, Voyager: Probe Has Finally Entered Interstellar Space

This artist's illustration shows the Voyager 1 space probe. The spacecraft was launched on Sept. 5, 1977, and as of August 2012, it is outside the bubble of hot gas, known as the "heliopause," that radiates from the sun.
NASA/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 4:34 pm

NASA's two Voyager spacecraft, launched in 1977, have made history in a dramatic fashion by exploring the outer planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Now one of the vehicles, Voyager I, has made another pioneering leap. It is the first spacecraft to leave the vast bubble of hot gas that surrounds our solar system.

At long last, Voyager 1 is now in interstellar space.

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The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Fire Sweeps Through Businesses Along Jersey's Seaside Boardwalk

Firefighters battle a raging fire on boardwalk in Seaside Park, N.J., on Thursday.
Fox 29/AP

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 2:36 pm

A fire that started in an ice cream shop is spreading elsewhere along New Jersey's famous boardwalk in Seaside Park.

News video shows the boardwalk — located in an area that had just been rebuilt after it was destroyed by Superstorm Sandy nearly a year ago — clouded by thick smoke.

Seaside Heights Police Chief Thomas Boyd tells The Star-Ledger the fire spread to adjacent structures around 2:30 p.m.

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The Two-Way
12:23 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Twitter Says It Intends To Go Public

In this Nov. 8, 2011, photo, NASA fan David Parmet signs his name on a Twitter logo during a tweetup event for about 50 of NASA's Twitter followers at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.
Brock Vergakis AP

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 12:45 pm

After much speculation, Twitter announced its intention to be traded as a public company, on Thursday.

Naturally, the 200-million-user microblogging service made the announcement through a tweet:

While pondering an announcement, USA Today reported that this initial public offering would be watched very carefully by other tech companies looking to take the plunge. The paper added:

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Shots - Health News
12:19 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Florida Officials Swat At Mosquitoes With Dengue Fever

In 2010, Florida health officials looked for mosquito larvae in vehicle tires where water had collected. As many as 15 cases have been found in Stuart this year.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 1:29 pm

Public health officials in Florida are once again scrambling to contain an outbreak of dengue fever, a disease spread by mosquitoes.

Until 2009, when it surfaced in Key West, the tropical disease hadn't been seen in Florida in more than 70 years.

Now there are concerns dengue may establish a foothold in the state.

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Shots - Health News
12:06 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Connecticut Takes Obamacare To The People

Outreach worker Emanuela Cebert (right) talks to Papilon Ferreiras about health insurance outside a rap concert.
Jeff Cohen WNPR

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 3:12 am

All across Connecticut, you can see billboards and TV ads, hear radio spots and get pamphlets about how to get insurance under the new health care law starting Oct. 1.

But the state is also using less traditional, and more expensive, ways to get the word out.

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The Two-Way
12:03 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Frightened By Friday The 13th? Say Paraskevidekatriaphobia

iStockphoto.com

It's baaaaack.

Friday the 13th, that is.

So in what's become a Two-Way tradition, we again offer something that's supposed to help.

Learning how to say paraskevidekatriaphobia supposedly cures one of any Friday the 13th-related fears.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
12:01 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

How One Unkind Moment Gave Way To 'Wonder'

Random House

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 1:16 pm

In Wonder, R.J. Palacio tells the story of Auggie, a tough, sweet, 10-year-old boy, who was born with distorted facial features — a "craniofacial difference" caused by an anomaly in his DNA.

Palacio tells NPR's Michele Norris that the book was inspired by a real-life encounter with her own kids six years ago. They were at an ice cream store and sat next to a little girl with a severe facial deformity. Palacio's 3-year-old son cried in fear, so the author grabbed her kids and fled. She was trying to protect the girl but also avoid her own discomfort.

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The Two-Way
11:40 am
Thu September 12, 2013

WATCH: An Amazing Rescue In Colorado

In this image made with a slow shutter speed which blurred the rushing water, flood waters course through a small park in Boulder, Colo., on Thursday.
Jud Valeski AP

Despite the bad news out of Colorado — where massive flooding has left three people dead — there is a bright spot: Rescue workers were able to extract three drivers stuck inside submerged vehicles.

Video of one of those rescues is awe-inspiring. Via ABC News, it speaks for itself:

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NPR Story
11:38 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Newfound Aquifers Can Quench Drought-Prone Region's Thirst

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 5:30 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Radar technology, which is used to find oil underground, has been modified to look for an even more precious resource: water. And yesterday, scientists announced their biggest find yet: an underground lake at least as large as Rhode Island, 1,000 feet below the Kenyan desert. NPR's Gregory Warner reports Kenyans are celebrating, cautiously.

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NPR Story
11:38 am
Thu September 12, 2013

U.S. Might Pause Plans To Ramp Up Syrian Rebel Training

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 12:48 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

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NPR Story
11:38 am
Thu September 12, 2013

New York Fashion Week Shows Little Model Diversity, Again

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 12:48 pm

As New York Fashion Week comes to an end, Audie Cornish talks to Robin Givhan, style and culture writer for The Cut from New York Magazine, about diversity on the runway and her favorite show.

Shots - Health News
11:26 am
Thu September 12, 2013

How A 'Breakfast at Tiffany's' Video Improved Asthma Treatment

Tapas Mukherjee shot this asthma education video in a field near his home.
Tapas Mukherjee YouTube

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 3:12 am

Doctors and staff at a British hospital were doing a lousy job of treating patients in the midst of life-threatening asthma attacks. Less than half of the doctors made use of asthma treatment guidelines. One-third of them didn't even know the asthma guidelines existed.

That all changed when one of the doctors posted a homemade music video on YouTube.

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Bulgaria Closes Cold War 'Umbrella Murder' Case

Georgi Markov in a photo taken in September 1978, the same month he died. The Bulgarian defector worked for the BBC and was killed by an unknown assassin in London using a ricin-tipped umbrella.
AP

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 1:56 pm

Thirty-five years after the assassination of Bulgarian defector Georgi Markov by a ricin-tipped umbrella as he waited for a bus in London, no one knows for sure who was responsible. And now it's quite possible that no one ever will.

Bulgaria's chief prosecutor said Thursday that his office is officially closing the Cold War cold case, saying the statute of limitations has run out. If there's ever to be a resolution, it's entirely up to British authorities, he says.

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The Two-Way
10:38 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Decades-Long Peace Vigil At White House Is Interrupted

Concepcion Picciotto, also known as Conchita or Connie, is seen at her daily protest in front of the White House on March 5, 2010 in Washington, DC. Picciotto has lived in the small camp on Lafayette Square directly opposite the presidential mansion since August 1, 1981 in protest of nuclear arms.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 10:41 am

If you've ever made the trip to Washington, D.C., you've likely visited the White House and in the small park in front of it, you've likely noticed an aging protester at the helm of an encampment.

She is Concepcion "Connie" Picciotto, 77, and she has kept a peace vigil in front of the presidential residence since the 1980s.

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The Salt
10:24 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Taking Down Big Food Is The Name Of Chipotle's New Game

Chipotle Mexican Grill launched The Scarecrow, an arcade-style adventure game for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.
Business Wire

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 10:22 am

Chipotle Mexican Grill prides itself on the fact that it serves only "responsibly raised beef, pork and chicken." That means the meat it buys comes from animals raised outside or in comfy pens, who are never given antibiotics and are fed an additive-free, vegetarian diet.

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Code Switch
10:13 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Feminism And Race: Just Who Counts As A 'Woman Of Color'?

There needs to be more diversity in feminism, writes Lindsey Yoo. (And, apparently, in stock photos, too.)
Images.com Corbis

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 12:08 pm

For the next part of our roundtable on the tensions and challenges in feminism along issues of race, we picked the brain of Filthy Freedom's Lindsey Yoo. Yoo had been following the sprawling #solidarityisforwhitewomen conversation, and felt that Asian-American women were often sidelined or overlooked when people talk about issues affecting women of color.

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Parallels
9:55 am
Thu September 12, 2013

For Some Syrian Refugees, A New Home In Germany

Syrian refugees wait in Beirut before a flight to Germany on Wednesday. More than 100 Syrians were on the flight, the first mass relocation program for Syrian refugees. Germany has agreed to take in 5,000 of them.
Nabil Mounzer EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 12:21 pm

As a Syrian Christian man rolled the family luggage through Beirut's international airport, he practiced his German: "Thank you, danke, dankeschon."

The man, who asked not to be named, is part of a group of Syrian refugees offered temporary resettlement by Germany for two years. The contingent, which flew out Wednesday, included 70 adults and 37 children and infants.

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The Two-Way
9:53 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Voyager Has Left The Solar System (This Time For Real!)

A NASA image of one of the Voyager space probes, launched in 1977 to study the outer solar system and eventually interstellar space.
NASA Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 12:31 pm

Stop us if you've heard this one: A spacecraft flies out of the solar system ...

Yes, the planetary probe Voyager 1, launched in the era of Jimmy Carter and bell-bottoms, has finally left the room, so to speak, years after completing its primary mission: a "grand tour" of the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn (twin Voyager 2 also visited Uranus and Neptune).

And years after we first started talking about its departure.

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It's All Politics
8:58 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Pro-Israel Lobby Finds Longtime Supporters Defect On Syria

Vice President Joe Biden, projected on screens, gestures as he addresses the American-Israeli Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) 2013 Policy Conference in March.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Sun September 15, 2013 5:40 am

The Obama administration is getting assistance from outside allies also trying to sell Congress on authorizing a military strike against Syria. Among the most prominent: strong backers of Israel.

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The Two-Way
8:48 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Prince William Musters Out: He's Leaving The Military

Flight Lt. Wales (a.k.a. Prince William or the Duke of Cambridge).
Arthur Edwards Getty Images

After more than seven years in the Royal Air Force that included three years of service as a helicopter pilot on search-and-rescue missions, the Duke of Cambridge is leaving the military life behind.

According to the BBC, "he will now focus on royal duties and charity work together with the Duchess of Cambridge, a palace spokesman said."

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Shots - Health News
8:14 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Big Measles Outbreaks Worry Federal Health Officials

The Eagle Mountain Church in Newark, Texas, was linked to at least 21 cases of measles this year, mostly in children.
LM Otero AP

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 9:06 am

Federal health officials are worried about an unusually high number of measles cases occurring in the United States this year.

There have been at least eight outbreaks so far this year involving 159 cases, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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