NPR News

Pages

Author Interviews
11:27 am
Sun June 16, 2013

A Posthumous Tribute To Guns From A Sniper Shot To Death

Firearms designer John Browning submitted this design for the M1911 pistol to the U.S. Patent Office in September 1910.
Courtesy William Morrow

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 1:17 pm

A killing on a Texas gun range in February captured the headlines. The victim was Chris Kyle, considered by many to be the most deadly sniper in American military history.

The man who admitted to killing him was a veteran as well — a young, disturbed man who had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Read more
Music Interviews
10:58 am
Sun June 16, 2013

'Glee' Guy Matthew Morrison On His First Love: Broadway

Matthew Morrison's musical life didn't start on TV; the Glee star is a Tony-nominated stage actor. Where It All Began is his second album of show tunes and standards.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 1:22 pm

Long before became known as Will Schuester — the lovable Spanish teacher and show choir director on TV's Glee — Matthew Morrison was dancing and singing, garnering Tony nods for his work on the Broadway stage.

Through it all, there was one song he always kept at the ready: "On the Street Where You Live" from My Fair Lady.

Read more
Author Interviews
10:54 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Dr. Brazelton On Guiding Parents And Learning To Listen

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 1:17 pm

For the better part of the past century, Dr. T. Berry Brazelton has studied babies, helping change the way we think about and care for them — right from the time they take their first breaths.

The renowned pediatrician hosted the long-running TV show What Every Baby Knows, and has written more than 30 books about child development. Hospitals worldwide rely on his newborn assessment known as the Brazelton scale.

At age 95, he's still going strong.

Read more
Parallels
10:43 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Iran's New President A Relative Moderate

Hasan Rowhani gestures to his supporters at a rally in Tehram Iran, on June 1. The midranking cleric, Iran's president-elect, is seen as a political moderate.
Ebrahim Noroozi AP

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 10:52 am

Calling it an era of wisdom and moderation, Iran's new president, Hasan Rowhani, vowed to integrate the country back into the international community and asked Western nations to adopt a more "respectful rhetoric" toward Iran.

His triumph Saturday with 18 million votes, slightly over half of the cast ballots, surprised many Iranians who had suspected that the leadership would repeat the controversial elections of 2009 that led to the re-election of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. By accepting Rowhani's victory, the regime may be taking a step to restore some of its lost legitimacy.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:13 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Turkey's Premier Says It's His Duty To Crush Protests

Protesters climb onto a police truck mounted with a water cannon during clashes with riot police at a demonstration in Ankara on Sunday.
Adem Altan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 10:45 am

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Sunday defended his order to forcibly evict thousands of anti-government protesters from Istanbul's Taksim Square, saying he had simply carried out his "duty" as the nation's leader.

In a speech to hundreds of thousands of supporters, Erdogan also railed against foreign media coverage and social media amid criticism of his government's handling of the protests, The Associated Press reports.

Read more
Parallels
7:56 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Violence Defies Pakistanis' Efforts To Define Their Nation

Pakistani security personnel inspect a burned-out bus on Sunday, a day after it was destroyed by a bomb attack in Quetta. The bus was carrying students from the region's only university for women. Fourteen women died.
Banaras Khan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 8:36 am

There is no more graphic example of the daunting challenges facing Pakistan's new prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, than the bloody events playing out in the west of his nation.

Just over a week after Sharif was sworn in for a third term, at least 24 people were killed in a day of violence that underscored the threat presented by violent militancy to the fabric of the Pakistani state.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:39 am
Sun June 16, 2013

How Do You Say 'Born To Ride' In Latin?

Pope Francis blesses a sick or disabled person wearing Harley-Davidson garb in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican on Sunday.
Andrew Medichini Associated Press

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 5:14 am

Pope Francis blessed a thundering parade of thousands of bikers on Sunday as Harley-Davidson riders descended on Rome to celebrate the motorcycle maker's 110th anniversary.

The Associated Press reports that the Harley's patented super-loud engines nearly drowned out the Latin recitation of "Our Father."

The AP writes:

Read more
The Protojournalist
6:13 am
Sun June 16, 2013

World's Shortest Business Brief: The Smoffice

The World's Smallest Office competition is over. But will the Smoffice create jobs?

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
6:01 am
Sun June 16, 2013

U.S. To North Korea: Dismantle Nuke Program, Then We'll Talk

The North and South Korean delegations meet at the border village of Panmunjom last week. The talks quickly fell apart.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 8:23 am

The White House says it's open to "senior-level" talks proposed by North Korea, but only if Pyongyang lives up to its U.N. obligations to dismantle its nuclear weapons program.

National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said Sunday that North Korea must meet "its obligations to the world." The U.S. will judge Pyongyang by "its actions and not its words," she said.

Earlier Sunday, Pyongyang proposed the high-level discussions with the U.S. just days after its direct talks with rival South Korea fell apart.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:22 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Jordan Says It's Ready If Syria Becomes Danger

Secretary of State John Kerry (left) meets with Jordan's King Abdullah at the Dead Sea last month.
Jim Young AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 7:41 am

Jordan's King Abdullah says his country stands ready to respond to any threat from a spillover of the civil war in neighboring Syria, a day after the U.S. announced it would leave fighter jets and Patriot missiles in his country after joint military exercises end this week.

"If the world does not help as it should, and if the matter becomes a danger to our country, we are able at any moment to take the measures to protect the country and the interest of our people," Abdullah said, speaking to graduating military cadets.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:41 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Iran's President-Elect Meets With Caution In West

Iranians celebrate the victory of moderate presidential candidate Hasan Rowhani (portrait) at Vanak square in northern Tehran on Saturday.
Atta Kenare AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 4:27 am

Hasan Rowhani's stunning presidential election victory in Iran has opened the door for improved relations with the West, but the U.S. and Israel remain cautious about making progress on their key demand — dismantling Iran's nuclear program.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Sunday said the international community "must not give in to wishful thinking or temptation and loosen the pressure on Iran for it to stop its nuclear program."

Read more
The Two-Way
3:22 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Syrian Strife Draws In Neighbors, Global Players

A Syrian rebel aims his sniper rifle at Syrian government forces in the Sheikh Maqsud district of Aleppo, in April.
Dimitar Dilkoff AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 5:49 am

The conflict in Syria may be first and foremost a civil war, pitting the Shiite-dominated regime of President Bashar Assad against mostly Sunni insurgents. But the region's turbulent geopolitics have turned it into a proxy fight that has drawn in the rest of the region as well as the U.S and other global powers.

Read more
NPR Story
2:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Putting Up A Good Front For The G8

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Like a lot of Northern Ireland, County Fermanagh, where the G8 Summit is being held has been hit hard by the recession in recent years. A lot of businesses there have had to close their doors. But before world leaders started pouring in for the G8 Summit, county officials decided to give their town a bit of a facelift. With money from a government grant, they put fake storefronts on some of the shuttered businesses. Imagine big stickers plastered to store windows to make them look like thriving stores; a real butcher shop or a busy cafe.

Read more
NPR Story
2:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Will The NSA Rethink Its Data Collection System?

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We've started hearing from some of the Internet companies implicated in the NSA data collection scandal. On Friday, Facebook and Microsoft disclosed for the first time that last year they received thousands of requests from the government to hand over information about their users. Meanwhile, the National Security Agency is still on the defensive. The agency's head spoke on Capitol Hill last week in an effort to reassure lawmakers that the NSA is not spying on Americans.

Read more
NPR Story
2:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Baghdad Businessman Reflects On Violence In Iraq

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Ambassador Crocker is watching what's happening in Iraq with a careful eye. So are the many Iraqis who fled the country several years ago, when sectarian tensions there escalated to something close to civil war. Haider al-Jumaili was one of them. He is a mechanical engineer but he lost his job after the U.S. invasion and found work as an interpreter for U.S. organizations. Eventually, the sectarian violence started to overwhelm him.

HAIDER AL-JUMAILI: I left my country because of these two words: The Sunnis and the Shias.

Read more
NPR Story
2:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Bringing Extreme WIFI To Remote Places

Google scientists have been testing a way to link computers to the internet in rural, war torn or disaster areas where high speed internet does not exist. We hear from Steven Levy, a senior writer with Wired magazine who was embedded with the Google team.

NPR Story
2:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Economy Was Key In Iranian Election

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 4:27 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
2:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Police Clear Protesters In Istanbul Park

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 5:40 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
2:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Lebanon Feels The Pain Of Syrian War Spillover

Weekend Edition Sunday Host Rachel Martin talks to Michael Young, the opinion page editor of the Daily Star newspaper in Beirut, about the spillover of Syria's conflict into Lebanon.

NPR Story
2:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Colorado Springs Learns To Live With Fire

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Colorado is often the site of devastating forest fires, but the city of Colorado Springs has been hit particularly hard as of late. In the span of just one year, more than 800 homes have been destroyed from wildfires in and around the city. This time last year, it was the Waldo Canyon fire, and now it's the Black Forest fire. NPR's Kirk Siegler spent the week in Colorado Springs and sent this report.

Read more
NPR Story
2:38 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Syria, Economy Top The G8 Agenda

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

President Obama leaves tonight on a quick trip to Europe. He'll attend a G8 summit of industrialized nations in Northern Ireland. He'll also pay a visit to Germany, where his plans include a public speech at the historic Brandenburg Gate.

NPR's Scott Horsley will be traveling with the president. He joins us now. Hi, Scott.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Rachel.

Read more
You Must Read This
2:03 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Evelyn Waugh's 'Scoop': Journalism Is A Duplicitous Business

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 9:30 am

Alexander Nazaryan is a writer living in Brooklyn.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:39 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Coping On Father's Day Without Dad

Marc Silver and his daughter Maya wrote a book about how teens deal with a parent sick with cancer.
Richard Nowitz Courtesy of Marc Silver

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 4:29 am

Steven's father had been diagnosed with cancer. The doctors didn't think he would make it. Pale and bald, he didn't look himself. Steven wanted to take a picture, made a video, just in case. Dad refused. "I got so mad," Steven remembers. "I regret not just coming up to him and saying, 'Dad, five minutes.' "

Steven's dad died on June 12, 2011. "The only time I can hear his voice is on our answering machine for two seconds," Steven says. "Hi, Heinz family, leave a message."

Read more
The Two-Way
1:23 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Wave Of Attacks Leaves At Least 30 Dead In Iraq

A string of deadly attacks that appeared to be coordinated car bombings and shootings killed at least 30 people and left many more wounded across Iraq on Sunday, the Associated Press reports.

The AP has more:

"Most of the car bombs hit Shiite-majority areas and were the cause of most of the casualties, killing 26. The blasts hit half a dozen cities and towns in the south and center of the country.

Read more
The Sunday Conversation
12:06 am
Sun June 16, 2013

U.S. Diplomat Reflects On A Life Lived In Other Lands

Then-U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan Ryan Crocker (left) shakes hands with Afghan President Hamid Karzai in 2011. During his 37 years as a diplomat, Crocker served as ambassador to six Muslim countries.
AP

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 5:20 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Ryan Crocker is a long-time U.S. diplomat who served as ambassador in six Muslim countries. He received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, America's highest civilian award, from President George W. Bush.

Born into a military family, Crocker says he was drawn to the foreign service because he grew up overseas and spent time traveling in the Middle East.

Read more
News
12:05 am
Sun June 16, 2013

My Father, The Pilot

Louis Parsons in his late teens, circa 1946, standing beside an Aeronca Champion airplane, a typical trainer plane for aspiring post-war private pilots.
Parsons Family Photograph

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 5:38 pm

My dad was a mild-mannered guy. Never bragged. Hated sports. Mom won the arguments. He was an avocado farmer near Santa Barbara, but being dad was his No. 1 job.

He read me bedtime stories, never missed a piano recital or a family dinner. And he played it safe: Dad's idea of adventure was driving his Ford Taurus to town without the wiper fluid filled to the top.

Read more
Politics
12:05 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Why Both Sides Want Gay Marriage Settled By The States

Anti-gay marriage protesters (left) try to persuade same-sex marriage supporters to get out of the way of their march in front of the Supreme Court.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters/Landov

The Supreme Court may rule on gay marriage this week. Advocates both for and against are glad the issue didn't reach the court any sooner.

They didn't want a repeat of the abortion issue. With its landmark decision in Roe v. Wade, the high court stepped in and guaranteed a right to abortion but also triggered a backlash that has lasted for 40 years.

With same-sex marriage, by contrast, legislators and voters in nearly every state had the chance to make their feelings known before the Supreme Court weighs in.

Read more
Parallels
10:48 pm
Sat June 15, 2013

Burning Down The House: Artistic Freedom Under Fire In Egypt

Egyptian employees of the Cairo Opera House and opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi hold placards during a demonstration inside the opera's compound in Cairo on May 30, following the dismissal of the head of the opera house. The firing is the latest salvo in a cultural war between artists and the ruling Muslim Brotherhood.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 10:50 pm

Read more
Around the Nation
1:25 pm
Sat June 15, 2013

Water Wars: Who Controls The Flow?

Cattle stand in a heavily irrigated pasture in Oregon's Upper Klamath Basin. The state has ordered ranchers in the region to shut down irrigation. The move is aimed at protecting the rights of Indian tribes who live downstream.
Amelia Templeton for NPR

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 2:39 pm

So often, we take water for granted. We turn on the faucet and there it is. We assume it's our right in America to have water. And yet, water is a resource. It's not always where we need it, or there when we need it.

Rivers don't follow political boundaries — they flow through states and over international borders. And there are endless demands for water: for agriculture, drinking, plumbing, manufacturing, to name just a few. And then there's the ecosystem that depends on water getting downstream.

So what are our legal rights when it comes to water? And who decides?

Read more
Around the Nation
12:03 pm
Sat June 15, 2013

Fighting Unwanted Cat Calls, One Poster At A Time

New York artist Tatayana Fazlalizadeh uses posters to combat unwanted cat calls and attention from men in her neighborhood.
Courtesy of Tatayana Fazlalizadeh

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 1:19 pm

It's hard to go unnoticed in New York City, with everyone checking out the latest fashions and hairstyles. As the weather warms, some women who are shedding those winter layers are finding themselves the object of more cat calls, whistles and roving eyes than they'd like.

Artist Tatayana Fazlalizadeh is not going to take it anymore.

Under the cover of darkness, wearing a black knit hit, black leather jacket and black Chuck Taylors, Fazlalizadeh is nearly invisible. She's scouring Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, for a blank canvas.

Read more

Pages