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Parallels
10:27 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

High-Tech Sensors Help Old Port City Leap Into Smart Future

The Spanish city of Santander is using a network of sensors to help improve services and save money. Incidents reported to Santander's command-and-control center, where the city manages data from sensors and smartphone reports made by citizens, are plotted on a map of the city.
Courtesy of the University of Cantabria

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:53 am

Aside from the occasional ferry down from England, the old Spanish port city of Santander doesn't get too many foreign visitors. So imagine the locals' surprise when delegations from Google, Microsoft and the Japanese government all landed there recently, to literally walk the streets.

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Parallels
10:24 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

As U.S. Troops Draw Down, Can Afghans Take The Lead?

Villagers in Kasan gather to meet with Afghan local police and the Afghan National Army along with ANASF team members during a morning shura to discuss security.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 6:25 am

There's just a sliver of light in the eastern sky as the patrol leaves the American compound through a thick metal door.

They scamper across Highway 2, a narrow asphalt road that leads to Kabul, just an hour's drive away — if not for the war. They cross an old graveyard and head toward the silhouette of a tree line, all seen through the eerie green glow of night-vision goggles.

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Shots - Health News
9:19 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Obama Administration Seeks To Ease Approvals For Antibiotics

These staph bacteria are resistant to vancomycin, an antibiotic that is one of the last lines of defense.
Janice Haney Carr CDC

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 12:15 pm

Every day in hospitals all over America, thousands of patients die of infections that used to be curable. But the antibiotics used to treat them aren't working anymore.

It's called drug resistance, and it's largely a consequence of antibiotics overuse. The more germs are exposed to antibiotics, the faster they mutate to evade being vanquished.

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Code Switch
7:03 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

New Survey Takes A Snapshot Of The View From Black America

African-Americans said they were optimistic about the future despite anxieties about possible financial hardships.
Barry Gregg Corbis

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 12:19 pm

You might think African-Americans might be more pessimistic about their lives. The housing crisis decimated pockets of black wealth. The black unemployment rate has been nearly double the national average for several years.

But according to findings from our survey of more than 1,000 African-Americans, you'd be wrong.

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It's All Politics
2:35 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

White House-Issa Fight: Nasty But Normal In Washington

Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, is just doing what Congress does at times of divided government.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Anyone searching for the place where the friction between the Obama White House and congressional Republicans is throwing off the most angry sparks need look no further than the clashes between the administration and Rep. Darrell Issa.

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The Two-Way
2:29 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Mississippi Man Indicted On Charges Of Mailing Ricin Poision

James Everett Dutschke has been indicted on five counts related to letters containing the poison ricin that were sent to President Obama and others.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 3:45 pm

James Everett Dutschke, the Mississippi man arrested in April on suspicions that he sent letters containing the poison ricin to President Obama and other officials, has been indicted on five federal charges, from sending threats in the mail to knowingly making and possessing "a biological agent... for use as a weapon."

Maximum punishments for the counts leveled against Dutschke, 41, range from five years to life in prison.

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Shots - Health News
2:22 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Miss. Turns To 'Cord Blood' To Track Down Statutory Rapists

Gov. Phil Bryant, at the Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Summit in Jackson, Miss., in 2012, supports a controversial effort to identify men who impregnate teen girls.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 3:43 am

Mississippi lawmakers have embarked on a controversial campaign to discourage older men from having sex with teenagers.

Starting in July, doctors and midwives in the state will be required by law to collect samples of umbilical cord blood from babies born to some girls under the age of 16. Officials will analyze the samples and try to identify the fathers through matches in the state's DNA database.

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Shots - Health News
12:54 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Love In The Time Of TB: A Young Family Fights An Ancient Foe

Oxana and Pavel Rucsineanu walk to the tuberculosis hospital in Balti, Moldova. Oxana and their new baby live in an apartment, but Pavel still has to stay at the TB ward, fighting for his life.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 5:33 am

Oxana and Pavel Rucsineanu fell in love under the drug-induced haze of powerful tuberculosis medications. It was the summer of 2008. They were both in their late 20s, and they should have been in the prime of their lives.

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The Two-Way
12:24 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Bradley Manning Court-Martial Begins In WikiLeaks Case

The trial of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, seen here last month, began Monday with prosecutors saying he delivered thousands of classified documents to America's enemies when he provided data to WikiLeaks.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 3:50 pm

Starkly different views of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning were presented Monday, the first day of his court-martial on charges that he aided the enemy when he gave a large batch of classified data to WikiLeaks that was then posted online.

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U.S.
12:09 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Calif. Firefighters Rush To Get Ahead Of Early Fire Season

The Summit Fire burned hot and fast up the Banning Pass area, near Beaumont, Calif., on May 1, leaving a moonscape in its wake. Houses that had cleared brush and wood from around their property were left unscathed.
Nathan Rott NPR

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 11:39 am

Fire season is off to an early start in the West. Across California, a hot and dry spring has fire crews on alert. Northeast of Los Angeles, thousands of firefighters are making progress toward controlling the so-called Powerhouse Fire, which has burned more than 30,000 acres and destroyed several homes.

And with no rain in sight, firefighters are out readying homes for a particularly bad year.

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Music Interviews
12:09 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Authentic Early Jazz, From A 23-Year-Old 'WomanChild'

Cecile McLorin Salvant's new album is titled WomanChild.
John Abbott Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 1:53 pm

Jazz musicians Cecile McLorin Salvant and Aaron Diehl, both in their 20s, have already racked up major industry pr

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Monkey See
11:14 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Foster Families Take Center Stage

Cierra Ramirez, Teri Polo, and Jake T. Austin star in ABC Family's The Fosters.
Randy Holmes ABC Family

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 8:42 am

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Author Interviews
11:14 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Hello Muddah, Hello Drama: The Brief Bloom Of Parodist Allan Sherman

Allan Sherman released three albums between October 1962 and August 1963.
Courtesy Robert Sherman

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 1:53 pm

The summertime novelty tune "Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh" has been pouring out of radios for 50 years now. In late July of 1963, Billboard magazine reported that fans were "actually breaking down doors" of record stores to buy the song about the pains of summer camp.

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Law
11:14 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Supreme Court Rules DNA Can Be Taken After Arrest

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday in a case that looked at whether police could take DNA samples from people who had been arrested but not yet convicted of a crime.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 1:53 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that police can routinely take DNA samples from people who are arrested but not yet convicted of a crime, and see if the DNA matches any samples from unsolved crimes in a national database.

The 5-to-4 decision split the court's conservative and liberal blocs, with conservative Justice Antonin Scalia authoring a fiery dissent. Twenty-eight states and the federal government have enacted laws that provide for automatic DNA testing of arrestees.

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It's All Politics
11:13 am
Mon June 3, 2013

5 Things You May Not Know About Sen. Frank Lautenberg

Sen. Frank Lautenberg speaks to members of the press in January.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 1:53 pm

New Jersey Sen. Frank Lautenberg wasn't a regular on the Sunday talk shows. He never ran for president or cut much of a national profile.

Still, the liberal Democrat, New Jersey's longest-serving senator, left his mark as a legislator on a wide range of issues, from transportation to public health to the environment.

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The Salt
10:38 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Grass: It's What's For Dinner (3.5 Million Years Ago)

Some 3.5 million years ago, our ancestors put grass on the menu.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 10:49 am

If you could travel back in time about 8 million years, you'd find a creature in an African tree that was the ancestor of all current apes and humans. And that creature in all likelihood would have spent a big part of its day munching leaves and fruit — pretty much what apes eat now.

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The Two-Way
10:20 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Wildfire North Of Los Angeles Is 40 Percent Contained Monday

Sparks fly from a burning hollowed tree in the area of the Powerhouse fire near Lake Hughes, Calif., Sunday.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 4:11 pm

Firefighters were able to double containment of the huge Powerhouse wildfire north of Los Angeles to 40 percent Monday, as cooler weather helped them against the blaze that has scorched more than 45 square miles. No deaths have been reported as a result of the fire, which caused some 1,000 homes to be evacuated.

Update at 9 p.m. ET. Some Evacuations Lifted; Name Explained:

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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Why Chase Tornadoes? To Save Lives, Not To 'Die Ourselves'

Friday's storm, which produced a mile-wide tornado, as it neared El Reno, Okla.
Richard Rowe Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 3:10 am

  • Josh Wurman on why scientists get close to tornadoes
  • Josh Wurman on how the community is reacting to three storm chasers' deaths

The deaths Friday of veteran storm chaser Tim Samaras, his son Paul and their friend Carl Young when a tornado near El Reno, Okla., pummeled their vehicle has raised some questions:

-- Why do storm chasers do what they do?

-- Do the benefits outweigh the dangers?

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The Salt
9:09 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Dunkin' Donuts Glazed Donut Breakfast Sandwich

We couldn't wait for Dunkin's Glazed Donut Breakfast Sandwich to go national, so we got the raw materials and made our own.
NPR

Like all great traditional Boston foods — the Boston Cream Pie, Boston Baked Beans, the Chicago Pizza at the Pizzeria Uno near Fenway — the Glazed Donut Breakfast Sandwich is about to go national. Someday, Bostonians will talk about how they heard it play when it was just a cool, local sandwich.

Ian: I never realized how pointless bagels were before.

Miles: I like a breakfast that forces me to take a nap right after waking up.

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Parallels
8:53 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Calls For Justice For Tiananmen Met With Silence

For 24 years, Ding Zilin has sought justice for the death of her 17-year-old son, Jiang Jielian, on June 3, the night before Chinese authorities cracked down on protesters in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. Now, the 76-year-old despairs that she will die before she is allowed to mourn her son on the spot where he was killed. She stands in front of a small shrine to her son in her Beijing home.
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 3:31 pm

Ding Zilin has spent the past 24 years on one mission: seeking justice for the death of her son, 17-year-old Jiang Jielian, who was shot in the back by Chinese soldiers on the night of June 3, 1989.

This year, her mood is one of black despair.

"It's possible that before I leave this world, I won't see justice," the frail 76-year-old told me. We're sitting in the living room of her Beijing home, near a shrine to her son that includes a wooden cabinet holding his ashes.

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It's All Politics
8:46 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Lautenberg's Death Sets Off New Jersey Senate Scramble

Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., died Monday at age 89. He had announced in February that he would not seek re-election in 2014.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 9:09 am

The traditionally collegial U.S. Senate was never a natural fit for Frank Lautenberg, the wealthy New Jersey businessman whose headstrong, CEO style could rankle.

But the five-term senator, who died early Monday at age 89, managed to serve as a passionate and able advocate for a tight collection of causes, from gun control and public health to Israel and mass transit.

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The Salt
8:32 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Wal-Mart Pledges Fresher Produce By Cutting Out The Middleman

A shopper selects produce at a Wal-Mart in Deptford, N.J.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 11:02 am

The nation's largest retailer announced Monday that it will be delivering produce from farms to stores faster by buying fruits and vegetables directly from growers.

The plan is to source about 80 percent of fresh produce directly, explained Jack Sinclair, executive vice president of the food business for Wal-Mart U.S., during a conference call that we participated in Monday morning.

In many instances, Sinclair says it will be possible to "cut out the middleman," but he added that local wholesalers will continue to "play an important role for us in the areas we serve."

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Shots - Health News
8:03 am
Mon June 3, 2013

More Children Poisoned By Parents' Prescription Drugs

Popular prescription drugs like statins are causing more childhood poisonings.
Matt Rourke ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 8:25 am

Dad takes a cholesterol-lowering statin so he'll be around to see the kids grow up. But statins, like Lipitor and Zocor, as well as some other common adult prescription drugs are causing a rise in poisonings among children, a study says.

The big surprise is that children are at risk not just from opioid painkillers like Vicodin and OxyContin, which most parents know need to be kept away from kids.

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The Two-Way
7:17 am
Mon June 3, 2013

VIDEO: Yankees And Red Sox Flinch As Lightning Strikes

As the sky darkened and the storm moved in Sunday at Yankee Stadium, this police officer was among many warily looking up.
Mike Stobe Getty Images

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Shots - Health News
6:42 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Middle East Coronavirus Shows Up In Italy

Here's the coronavirus that appears to have originated in the Middle East and has caused severe illnesses in people living there and in Europe.
AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 1:24 pm

Now a virus that has caused respiratory failure and 30 deaths has turned up in Italy.

The World Health Organization says lab tests have confirmed the infections in a 2-year-old girl and a 42-year-old woman with the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, or MERS-CoV, as it's now called.

Both of the patients, who are in stable condition, are close contacts of someone who traveled to Jordan recently, the WHO says.

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The Two-Way
6:34 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Boy Scouts March In Uniform At Utah Gay Pride Parade

Members of the Boys Scouts of America and some of their families marched Sunday in Salt Lake City's Utah Pride parade.
Jim Urquhart Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 7:11 am

Ten days after their national organization voted to allow openly gay boys to be members, a handful of Boy Scouts marched in uniform on Sunday at the Utah Pride Parade in Salt Lake City.

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The Two-Way
6:18 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Supreme Court Upholds Warrantless Collection Of DNA

The U.S. Supreme Court building
Zhang Jun Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 11:24 am

By a 5-4 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court has upheld a Maryland law that allows police to collect DNA, without first getting a warrant, from persons who are arrested.

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The Two-Way
6:09 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Why Do People Live In Twister-Prone Oklahoma?

Tammy Wade (left) is hugged by Dana Givens in what is left of her home in El Reno, Okla., on Sunday, after it was destroyed by a tornado.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

In covering the devastating tornadoes in Oklahoma, we've been asking a lot of questions about safety and preparedness.

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Strange News
5:23 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Scottish Couple Welcomes Third Set Of Twins

Karen and Colin Rodger already had two sets of boys. When Mom got pregnant this time, the thought of more twins crossed her mind, but a doctor said the odds were 500,000 to 1. Now she's given birth to twin girls, and the family tells the Daily Mirror it's shopping for a van.

The Two-Way
5:06 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Sen. Frank Lautenberg Dies

Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., in October 2012.
Jason Kempin Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 6:07 am

New Jersey Sen. Frank Lautenberg died early Monday, his office says in a statement sent to reporters.

He was 89. According to the statement, the Democratic senator "passed away due to complications from viral pneumonia at 4:02 a.m. today at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell."

As the senator's office adds, Lautenberg was "the last remaining World War II veteran serving in the Senate."

He announced in February that he would not be seeking a sixth term in the Senate.

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