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6:09 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Gunfire Exchanged In Standoff At Cairo Mosque

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:35 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. And this week, Egypt witnessed the bloodiest day in its modern history. More than 600 people were killed, most are in a security crackdown on supporters of the ousted president, Mohamed Morsi. And it isn't over. Dozens more people have died since, some in citizen on citizen violence.

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The Two-Way
4:22 am
Sat August 17, 2013

NASA: Meteor In Russia Threw Up Globe-Girdling Plume Of Debris

A meteor trail is seen above a residential apartment block in the Urals city of Chelyabinsk on Feb. 15.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 3:19 pm

The bus-sized meteor that slammed into Russia in February, causing a massive shock-wave and injuring hundreds of people, sent a plume of dust into the stratosphere that circled the globe in just four days and lingered for months, NASA says.

The Feb. 15 meteor at Chelyabinsk near Russia's southern border with Kazakhstan measured 60 feet across and weighed 12,000 tons. It detonated 15 miles above the city.

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The Two-Way
3:13 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Dozens Dead, 'Huge' Number Missing In Philippine Ferry Sinking

A survivor cries as she arrives at hospital in Cebu after a ferry collided with a cargo ship in Cebu, central Philippines on Friday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 3:22 am

More than 30 people died and nearly 175 reportedly remained missing after a ferry collided with a cargo vessel and sank in the central Philippines.

Reuters reports that a gaping hole was left in the bow of the cargo ship after the collision with the ferry, MV Thomas Aquinas, on Friday near the country's second-largest city of Cebu:

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Middle East
2:55 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Despite Bloodshed, Many Egyptians Support Military

A pro-Morsi supporter stands with other demonstrators in Cairo's Abbassiya neighborhood on Friday.
Mohammed Abdel Moneim AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 3:16 am

Egypt witnessed the bloodiest day in its modern history this week. More than 600 people were killed, most during a security crackdown on supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

And it isn't over. Dozens more have died since, some in citizen-on-citizen violence. A standoff is going on at a central Cairo mosque, and the nation is spiraling out of control.

Much of Egypt has little sympathy for Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood or their supporters.

'For The Good Of Egypt'

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Movies
2:55 am
Sat August 17, 2013

The Words Vivien Leigh Left Behind

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:35 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "GONE WITH THE WIND")

VIVIEN LEIGH: (as Scarlett O'Hara) Oh, Rhett, please don't go. You can't leave me, please. I'll never forgive you.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "CAESAR AND CLEOPATRA")

CLAUDE RAINS: (as Julius Caesar) Who are you?

LEIGH: (as Cleopatra) Cleopatra, Queen of Egypt.

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Environment
2:55 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Dolphin Deaths Alarm Scientists

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:35 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Dolphins are washing ashore in alarming numbers in the Mid-Atlantic states this summer. More than 160 deaths of dolphins have been reported since early July and that's the worst fate in 26 years. Response teams from New York to Virginia are trying to determine just what's killing all these dolphins. Charlie Potter is working with one of those teams at the Virginia Aquarium and Marine Science Center.

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Digital Life
2:55 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Happy International Geocaching Day!

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:35 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

He would be probably the first to wish you a happy International Geocaching Day. Geo what?

DAVE PREBECK: Geocaching is basically a high tech scavenger hunt.

SIMON: That's Dave Prebeck, president of NOVAGO, the Northern Virginia Geocaching organization.

PREBECK: We have people go out and hide something and then they post the latitude and longitude on a website - geocaching.com is the primary one - and then those of us with GPS's get the latitude and longitude from the site and go out looking for them.

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Politics
1:02 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Immigration Reform Activists March To Calif. Farm Country

Marchers kick off a 21-day march calling for immigration reform in Sacramento, Calif. on Monday. The 285-mile walk through California's Central Valley ended in Bakersfield at the district office of House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:35 am

Immigrant and farm worker rights groups came from Los Angeles to Bakersfield, Calif., by the busload this week. Bakersfield, in the state's Central Valley, is farm country, and immigration is a complex issue here.

The groups were converging on the home of the third-most powerful Republican in the House, Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy.

Activists across the country are targeting a number of Republican members of Congress this summer, trying to pressure the House to take up the immigration reform bill passed in the Senate.

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Asia
1:02 am
Sat August 17, 2013

To Care For U.S. Kids, Filipinas Leave Their Own Behind

Lita and her son, Myke, now live in Houston together. She still works as a nanny and Myke is an interior designer. Lita's two daughters have also immigrated to the United States.
Ashley Westerman For NPR

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 11:53 am

Few American mothers could fathom a situation that would force them to leave their country in order to put food in their children's bellies, clothes on their backs and send them to school. This is the reality for many Filipina women, who cross oceans in search of jobs that pay enough to provide for their families back home.

The Philippines is known worldwide for sending its citizens overseas to work, and a recent study has shown the country consistently deploys more women than men. In the United States, Filipinas are often nurses and caretakers; many work as nannies

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The Salt
12:54 am
Sat August 17, 2013

How Many Cups Of Coffee Per Day Are Too Many?

A barista makes coffee using the pour-over method at Artifact Coffee in Baltimore.
NPR Benjamin Morris

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 6:40 am

That morning cup of Joe is a daily, practically sacred ritual for many of us.

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The Two-Way
11:15 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Egyptian Forces Reportedly Clear Mosque Of Morsi Backers

Egyptians shelter behind columns after police exchanged gunfire with supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi holed up inside a Cairo mosque on Friday.
Mohamed El-Shahed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 4:25 pm

(This post was last updated at 4:20 p.m. ET)

Egyptian security forces have stormed a Cairo mosque where supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi holed up for hours on Saturday.

Al-Jazeera reports that the Fateh mosque has been cleared of protesters opposed to the July 3 coup that ousted Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood from power.

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Ecstatic Voices
9:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Sufi Mystics Get A Modern Soundtrack

Riad Abdel-Gawad creates new Sufi music by translating sacred chants to the violin.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:35 am

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Music
9:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

William Tyler Speaks 'Truth' Through His Guitar

William Tyler performs in Iowa City.
Clay Masters

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:35 am

William Tyler takes the stage at the Trumpet Blossom Café, a vegan restaurant and bar in Iowa City. Surrounded by effects pedals for his guitar, he wears jeans and black cowboy boots, and his fingernails are about an inch long.

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The Two-Way
2:04 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Kyrgyz Officials Shut Down Alcohol-Smuggling Pipeline

A new pipeline between the Central Asian republics of Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan was until recently pumping away. Not oil, though — moonshine.

Customs and border officials in Kyrgyzstan uncovered the "makeshift underwater pipeline" on the bed of the Chu River, which divides the two countries. Officials think smugglers have sent thousands of liters of grain alcohol through the conduit from Kazakhstan.

The BBC writes:

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

N.J. Governor Gives Provisional OK to Medical Pot For Kids

Marijuana plants growing at a legal not-for-profit medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles last year.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 2:00 pm

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie agreed to ease restrictions on medical marijuana for chronically ill children, but he won't go as far as lawmakers would like.

NPR's Joel Rose reports that Christie, a Republican, has rejected part of a bill that would allow young patients access to an ingestible form of marijuana at state-approved dispensaries without the approval of a psychiatrist and pediatrician.

His partial veto sends the bill back to the Democratic-controlled Legislature for approval before it becomes law.

The Associated Press reports:

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All Tech Considered
1:32 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Switching To Gmail May Leave Reporters' Sources At Risk

In the digital world, almost everything you do to communicate leaves a trace. Often, emails are stored on servers even after they're deleted. Phone calls create logs detailing which numbers connected, when and for how long. Your mobile phone can create a record of where you are.

If you're a journalist trying to protect a confidential source, this is a very difficult world to work in.

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Politics
1:01 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

In Rural N.C., New Voter ID Law Awakens Some Old Fears

Opponents of North Carolina's new voter ID legislation wear tape over their mouths while sitting in the gallery of the House chamber of the North Carolina General Assembly in Raleigh, N.C., on April 24, where lawmakers debated new voter laws. On Monday, Gov. Pat McCrory signed a new law that requires a state-approved photo ID to vote and cuts early-voting opportunities.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 3:51 pm

This week, North Carolina's governor signed a new law requiring a state-approved photo ID to cast a vote in a polling place and shortening the period for early voting. The move comes just weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court invalidated a key provision of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which had required large parts of the state to get federal approval before changing voting laws.

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Research News
12:44 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

N. America's Oldest Known Petroglyphs Discovered In Nevada

Courtesy of Larry Benson

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 1:22 pm

Ancient North Americans gouged elaborate rock art into a heap of big boulders northeast of Reno, Nev., more than 10,000 years ago and perhaps 15,000 years ago. That makes the carvings the oldest known petroglyphs on the continent, according to a paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

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Shots - Health News
12:11 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

After These Docs Saw The Farm, They Didn't Want The City

A little doctoring away from it all can grow on a person.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:31 am

Finding doctors to work in the countryside isn't easy.

About 20 percent the U.S. population lives in rural areas, but only about 11 percent of doctors practice there. The lure of cities and suburbs has been hard to overcome. And doctor shortages, already acute in some rural areas, are expected to get worse.

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Code Switch
12:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

The Shift In Black Views Of The War On Drugs

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is calling for major changes to the nation's criminal justice system that would cut back the use of harsh sentences for certain drug-related crimes.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 6:57 am

This week, Attorney General Eric Holder called for sweeping changes to America's 40-year war on drugs. Holder is the first African-American in the nation's top law enforcement post. He's also part of a growing movement of black leaders who have pushed for major reforms to the drug war.

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Business
12:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Internet-Based TV Service May Not Change The Cable Market

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 1:22 pm

The race to create a viable Internet-based TV service is on, and the contestants include the biggest names in computer technology: Apple, Microsoft, Intel and Google. Sony has apparently reached a deal — as preliminary — with Viacom to carry the company's cable channels on its planned web TV service.

Planet Money
12:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

4 Reasons Subprime Loans Are Back (For Cars)

Rates may vary.
David Zalubowski AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 1:22 pm

"I wasn't even looking for a new car," Katrece Poole told me. But two years ago, a local car dealership running a direct-mail ad campaign sent her a letter saying they were making loans to lots of buyers. So she went down to the dealership, filled out the paperwork, and got approved — despite the fact that her car had been repossessed in 2005 because she missed payments.

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Latin America
12:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Peru's Natural Gas Rush Threatens Native Tribes, Again

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:15 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is one of the most critical tests for a developing economy: balancing development and the protection of human rights. It's currently playing out on the national stage in Peru. Several members of the president's cabinet have just resigned over plans to expand a gas field. It's in an area populated by tribes of Indians who have no contact with the outside world. Here's NPR's South America correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro.

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The Two-Way
11:56 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Embarrassed, Thai University Removes Anti-Cheating Hats

This is the photo of exam-taking Kasetsart University students that went viral.
Facebook via Coconuts Bangkok

Wandering eyes at test time is hardly a new problem, but a photo of one classroom's unique solution has proved an embarrassment for Kasetsart University in Thailand, The Bangkok Post reports.

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The Two-Way
11:51 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Painter Created Million-Dollar Forgeries In Queens Garage, Officials Say

An anonymous painter in New York City created dozens of art forgeries, which sold for more than $80 million, according to prosecutors. The man isn't facing charges — but those who helped sell his Abstract Expressionist canvases as the work of artists such as Jackson Pollock and Robert Motherwell are in trouble.

For NPR's Newscast unit, Joel Rose reports:

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The Salt
11:20 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Fight Food Waste: Drink Rum, Matey

Captain Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard, is said to have tucked slow-burning fuses into his beard and lit them on fire before plundering towns for gold and rum.
Hulton Archive Circa Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 6:40 am

The story of William McCoy sounds almost like a Prohibition-era version of Breaking Bad.

A mild-mannered shipbuilder, McCoy started smuggling booze along the Eastern seaboard during the early 1920s, only to become the top rum runner around.

He never touched his merchandise, never cut it with water, and shipped only the top-shelf liquors. In other words, he sold "the Real McCoy."

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The Two-Way
10:19 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Hell With The Lid Off: Coffee Drinkers' Plight Exposed In Canada

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:38 am

"Is this coffee, or is this Fight Club?" That's the question Bryan Hansen of Calgary, Canada, says he asked himself after his coffee lid betrayed him — yet again — leading him to fire off a letter of complaint to the Tim Hortons café chain, sending it to the attention of its "Lid Manager."

Hansen's fiercely funny note won fans on Reddit and elsewhere, as fellow customers stood up to say they, too, had been suffering in (scalded) silence because of the coffee and pastry stores' flip-top lids.

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The Two-Way
9:24 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Republicans To CNN And NBC: No Debates For You

During the 2012 campaign cycle, CNN was among several news networks that hosted Republican debates. Now, the GOP says it doesn't want to be on either that network or NBC.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Following through on an earlier warning, the Republican National Committee on Friday "unanimously passed a resolution preventing the committee from partnering with CNN and NBC for debates if they don't drop their Hillary Clinton productions ahead of the 2016 presidential election."

"CNN and NBC have shown clear favoritism, and they won't be hosting a single Republican primary debate," said RNC Chairman Reince Priebus.

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All Tech Considered
8:12 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Tech Week That Was: Hyperloop, The Next Blackout, Sites Down

A rendering of the proposed Hyperloop's passenger transport capsule.
Courtesy of Elon Musk

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:24 am

Each Friday we round up the big conversations in tech and culture during the week that was. We also revisit the work that appeared on this blog, and highlight what we're reading from our fellow technology writers and observers at other organizations.

ICYMI

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The Two-Way
7:50 am
Fri August 16, 2013

So Baaad It's Good: 'Sheep Protest' Video

YouTube.com/haywiredigital

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 9:16 am

We won't get complicated. This is just a video that you might enjoy on another day when there's been plenty of heavy news.

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