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12:09 am
Tue August 20, 2013

English Debate What To Do With Richard III's Remains

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 1:49 am

More than 500 years after the Wars of the Roses, the English are again fighting over Richard the Third. Archaeologists from the University of Leicester last year unearthed his remains under a parking lot in the city. Leicester Cathedral has earmarked more than a million pounds to give him a proper burial. But not so fast say the people of York.

Environment
9:57 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

How Extreme Australian Rains Made Global Sea Levels Drop

Heavy rains in Australia in 2010 and 2011 flooded farmland and homes, like these in the Queensland state town of St. George, seen here on Feb. 7. 2011.
Sally Nicol Rigney AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 4:19 am

Global sea level has been rising as a result of global warming, but in 2010 and 2011, sea level actually fell by about a quarter of an inch.

Scientists now say they know why: It has to do with extreme weather in Australia.

The sea level drop coincided with some of the worst flooding in that continent's history. Dozens of people died and torrents washed away houses and cars, forcing thousands from their homes.

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U.S.
9:56 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

One By One, California Agents Track Down Illegally Owned Guns

Firearms seized during a sweep by the Los Angeles Police Department using the California's Armed Prohibited Persons System initiative. The program uses a database to identify gun owners who are no longer allowed to possess a firearm.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 3:57 am

In California, officials are ramping up a unique program that identifies and seizes guns from people who are prohibited from keeping them. Under state law, a legally registered gun owner loses the right to own a firearm when he or she is convicted of a crime or becomes mentally ill.

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The Two-Way
9:25 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz To Renounce Canadian Citizenship

Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas speaks about immigration during a march near Capitol Hill in July.
Drew Angerer Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 3:41 am

Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas has been mentioned as a possible presidential candidate in the 2016 election. But to run for president, the U.S. Constitution says a candidate must be a "natural born" U.S. citizen; it doesn't mention dual citizenship.

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Music News
9:03 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

How To Win That Music Competition? Send A Video

If someone like Lang Lang were starting out now, the energetic concert pianist could nail every piano competition without the judges ever hearing a note, according to a new study.
China Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 12:13 am

Chia-Jung Tsay was something of a piano prodigy. By age 12, she was performing Mendelssohn in concert. At 16, she made her debut at Carnegie Hall. Soon, she was on her way to some of the best music schools in the country — Juilliard and the Peabody Conservatory. And she was throwing her hat in the ring for different competitions.

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It's All Politics
2:54 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

How To Make A Mayor Go Away: San Diego Weighs Filner Options

Ruth Johnson (right), who supports San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, speaks with anti-Filner protester Rob Shick (left) during a rally at the San Diego Concourse on Monday.
Denis Poroy AP

How do you solve a problem like Bob Filner?

How does a city make a scandal-plagued mayor go away when he stubbornly refuses to leave?

The San Diego City Council appears poised to apply what might be characterized as the Al Capone approach.

Capone, as you may recall from your history books, was a notorious 1920s-era Chicago gangster whom the feds finally nailed on a tax evasion charge.

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The Two-Way
2:02 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Guardian Editor: U.K. Govt. Destroyed Hard Drives With NSA Leaks

The offices of The Guardian and The Observer in London.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

A day after journalist Glenn Greenwald's partner was detained by authorities at London Heathrow Airport, the editor of the British newspaper that employs Greenwald is making a bomb-shell allegation: Alan Rusbridger writes that the British spy agency raided the offices of the The Guardian and destroyed hard drives containing some of the classified information leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

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Code Switch
2:01 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Reporter's Notebook: Hopi Sacred Objects Returned Home

A Katsina depicted in a mural at the Museum of Northern Arizona.
Laurel Morales KNAU

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 9:39 am

I cover Indian Country as a reporter for NPR member station KJZZ from a base in Flagstaff, which is on the edge of the country's largest reservation. So, I've educated myself about Navajo and Hopi cultural practices. This story, though, really tested me as a reporter and as a member of my community.

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All Tech Considered
1:58 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Combining The Nation's Digitized Libraries, All In One Place

The San Francisco Public Library has been digitizing its historical document collections for years, including the scrapbooks of famed homicide detective Theodore Kytka. The SFPL is among scores of libraries and archives adding their digital collections to the DPLA.
Via San Francisco Public Library

Part of a series, Keys To The Whole World: American Public Libraries

Buried in the archives of America's public and academic libraries are historical treasures — old papers, photos and records — that flesh out a detailed picture of our past.

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Europe
1:58 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Relying On Old Artisan Ways, French Brand Makes Itself Anew

Moynat was renowned for products such as the lightweight wicker trunk named Malle Anglaise, or English trunk, which was invented in 1873. This trunk was subsequently improved and a new patent filed in 1889.
Courtesy of Moynat

Founded in the mid-19th century, French luxury leather goods maker Moynat became renowned for making traveling trunks for the moneyed set. Though a pioneer in its field, it fell on hard times and closed its doors in the 1970s.

These days, the fabled company is undergoing a resurrection — turning out limited quantities of luxurious, handmade bags that rely on centuries-old craftsmanship.

On a recent day, Moynat's CEO, Guillaume Davin, leads me up the back stairs of the company's flagship boutique in Paris.

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The Two-Way
1:18 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Calif. Wins Permission To Force-Feed Prison Hunger Strikers

Inmates at California's Chino State Prison in December 2010.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 10:58 pm

This post was updated at 3:47 a.m. ET Tuesday:

The Associated Press reports: A federal judge approved Monday's request from California and federal officials to force-feed inmates if necessary as a statewide prison hunger strike entered its seventh week.

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Shots - Health News
12:52 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Lyme Disease Far More Common Than Previously Known

Black-legged ticks like this can transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.
CDC

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:58 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 300,000 Americans are getting Lyme disease every year, and the toll is growing.

"It confirms what we've thought for a long time: This is a large problem," Dr. Paul Mead tells Shots. "The bottom line is that by defining how big the problem is we make it easier for everyone to figure out what kind of resources we have to use to address it."

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Law
12:35 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Suit In Alabama Seeks To Stop School Choice Law

Southern Poverty Law Center President Richard Cohen discusses a federal lawsuit against the Alabama Accountability Act on Monday. Cohen says all students in Alabama can't take advantage of the law.
Dave Martin AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:58 pm

Parents in some rural Alabama counties are asking a federal court to block a new state law that gives tax breaks to families who transfer out of failing schools. They argue that their children aren't getting a fair shot at a quality education.

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Business
12:13 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Some Investors Choosing U.S. Over Emerging Markets

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For a long time, investors aiming for city profits have maintained that the smart money was on emerging markets. Economic growth in Brazil, Russia, India and China, the BRIC countries as they're known, has outstripped opportunities in the U.S. But in recent months, there is evidence that trend is starting to change. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports investors are turning back to markets in the U.S. and other developed economies.

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U.S.
12:13 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

3 Years Later, There's Still Work Left To Be Done On Dodd-Frank

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

Today, President Obama called all of the country's top financial regulators to the White House to get a progress report on implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act. That's the set of reforms that were passed following the financial crisis. With the fifth anniversary of the financial meltdown nearing, the president wants to communicate a sense of urgency about following through on the reforms.

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Media
12:13 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

U.K. Detains Partner Of Journalist Who Talked With Snowden

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:52 am
Mon August 19, 2013

For World Humanitarian Day, U.N. Joins With Kid President, Beyonce

In Haiti, an Argentinean U.N. doctor carries a sick baby to a helicopter, to be taken to Port-au-Prince for treatment. The photo is part of a gallery honoring World Humanitarian Day.
UN Photo/Marco Dormino Marco Dormino

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Shots - Health News
11:09 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Kids Involved in Bullying Grow Up To Be Poorer, Sicker Adults

It hurts now. And it hurts later, too.
iStockphoto.com

Bullied children and kids who bully others have more health problems when they grow up than kids who aren't part of the bullying cycle, a study finds. They're also more likely to have financial problems, including difficulty keeping a job.

The findings run counter to a still-widespread notion that bullying is a childhood rite of passage with little lasting harm, the researchers say.

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The Salt
10:43 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Incredibly Shrinking Avocados: Why This Year's Fruit Are So Tiny

We found lots of avocados being sold six or 10 to a $1 bag in the San Francisco area. Some weighed less than 3 ounces.
Alastair Bland for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 7:40 am

What's thick-skinned and leathery, about the size of an egg, essential for guacamole and sold eight for a dollar?

No, not limes. Hass avocados. This year, anyway. These pear-sized fruits usually weigh half a pound or more. In the summer of 2013, though, hundreds of thousands of trees in Southern California are sagging with the tiniest Hass avocados in local memory — some just the size of a golf ball.

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All Tech Considered
9:46 am
Mon August 19, 2013

The End Of Buttons: The New Gesture-Control Era

BlackBerry smartphones on a table during a "BlackBerry Brunch" in June in Berlin.
Timur Emek Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:58 pm

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Hurricane Sandy Task Force Urges More Resilient Construction

Damage is viewed in the Rockaway neighborhood where the historic boardwalk was washed away during Hurricane Sandy on October 31, 2012.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 12:58 pm

A task force commissioned by President Obama says that cities hit hardest by Super Storm Sandy need better construction to respond to the stronger storms spun by climate change.

In a report released today, the Hurricane Sandy Task Force lays out suggestions like building a more resilient and modern electric grid, new flood-protection and more stringent building standards in the affected areas.

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The Salt
8:53 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Sandwich Monday: PB&J Fries

Peter failed to hitch this to the back of his motorcycle and bring it back to Chicago for us.
NPR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 10:55 am

Canadians have given us so much, from the BlackBerry, a kind of phone your parents' older friends used to use, to Leslie Hope, the lady who played Kiefer Sutherland's wife in Season 1 of 24. But perhaps towering above all is poutine, which translated from the Quebecois is "stuff poured onto french fries." Usually it's some variation of cheese, meat and gravy, but I was told that in Portland, Ore. (naturally), at a food truck (naturally), you can get peanut butter and jelly on fries. So I went, naturally.

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The Two-Way
8:48 am
Mon August 19, 2013

No Ski Lift For You, Swiss Government Tells Kim Jong Un

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 8:49 am

A multimillion-dollar deal to provide ski lifts for a resort in North Korea has been cancelled, after Switzerland's government decided the plan violated U.N. sanctions forbidding the export of luxury items to the country.

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The Two-Way
7:51 am
Mon August 19, 2013

NPR CEO Gary Knell Announces He's Leaving

NPR CEO and President Gary Knell.
Sesame Workshop

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:58 pm

After fewer than 21 months on the job, NPR CEO Gary Knell announced at mid-day Monday that he's leaving the organization to become president and CEO at the National Geographic Society.

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Education
6:58 am
Mon August 19, 2013

California Upends School Funding To Give Poor Kids A Boost

Second-grade teacher Vickie Boudouris goes over a worksheet in an English-learner summer school class at the Cordova Villa Elementary School in June, in Rancho Cordova, Calif. Under Gov. Jerry Brown's proposed budget, California schools will receive an additional $3.6 billion this year, with much of it targeted to the neediest students.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

As the school year begins, districts in cities such as Oakland, Fresno and Los Angeles have not gone on a hiring spree.

But they might soon.

California has revamped its school funding formula in ways that will send billions more dollars to districts that educate large numbers of children who are poor, disabled in some way or still learning to speak English.

It's an approach that numerous other states, from New York to Hawaii, have looked into lately. But none has matched the scale of the change now underway in the nation's largest state.

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The Two-Way
6:48 am
Mon August 19, 2013

N.J. Gov. Christie To Sign Bill Banning Gay Conversion Therapy

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, seen in 2011, signed a bill barring licensed therapists from trying to turn gay teenagers straight.
Jessica Kourkounis Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 8:54 am

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie continues to eschew convention: The Associated Press reports that he will sign a bill banning therapy that seeks to turn gay teens straight.

The AP adds:

"In a signing note accompanying the bill that will be made public Monday, Christie said he believes people are born gay and that homosexuality is not a sin. ...

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The Two-Way
6:40 am
Mon August 19, 2013

End Of The Rainbow: Swedish Athlete Repaints Nails Red

Sweden's Emma Green Tregaro sports red nails as she waits to compete in the women's high jump final at the 2013 IAAF World Championships in Moscow. Green Tregaro was told her rainbow-colored nail violated track's rules against political statements.
Adrian Dennis AFP/Getty Images

Emma Green Tregaro, the Swedish athlete who painted her fingernails the colors of a rainbow to show support for gay rights, has repainted her nails red, after track and field's governing body warned that her nails flouted its ban on political statements at events.

Green Tregaro, who finished fifth in the high jump Saturday at the world championships in Moscow, had initially painted her fingernails as a subtle way to protest Russia's recent passage of a law banning gay "propaganda."

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Parallels
6:34 am
Mon August 19, 2013

The U.S. Defense Contractors That Benefit From Aid To Egypt

An Egyptian Apache helicopter flies over a crowd of pro-military demonstrators at Tahrir Square in Cairo on July 26. U.S. firms supply military hardware to the military, including the Apache helicopters.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 11:48 am

For decades, Egypt has been one of the largest recipients of U.S. foreign military aid, receiving everything from F-16s to tear gas grenades.

So who are the companies reaping the benefits?

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The Two-Way
6:06 am
Mon August 19, 2013

VIDEO: A-Rod Gets Plunked, Then Gets Revenge

New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez is hit by a pitch (you can see the ball just above his belt on the left side of his body) in the second inning of Sunday's game against the Boston Red Sox. He came back four innings later to hit a decisive home run.
Dominick Reuter Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 9:00 am

There was high drama Sunday night at Boston's Fenway Park. In the second inning, Red Sox pitcher Ryan Dempster threw four straight pitches that sure seemed to be designed to hit New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez.

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The Two-Way
4:54 am
Mon August 19, 2013

University Pages: LinkedIn Launches New College Profiles

The new University Pages on LinkedIn show which businesses employ a college's graduates, and the sectors of the economy in which they work.
LinkedIn

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 4:58 am

The professional connections site LinkedIn is launching a new section of its social network Monday: University Pages targets younger users who want to connect with colleges. More than 200 schools now have profile pages, according to LinkedIn. As part of the new effort, the company also dropped its minimum age to 14 in the U.S.

The new college profiles allow prospective students to see how many of a school's graduates are on LinkedIn, as well as a breakdown of the main fields in which they work. The pages also list the top employers of alumni.

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