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Books
10:07 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

For You To Borrow, Some Libraries Have To Go Begging

The Tyson Library in Ludlow, Vt., is required to support itself independently; public libraries in Vermont receive no state funding.
Neda Ulaby NPR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 11:14 am

More than 90 percent of Americans say public libraries are important to their communities, according to the Pew Research Center. But the way that love translates into actual financial support varies hugely from state to state.

Vermont, for instance, brags that it has more libraries per capita than any other U.S. state. Some of them are remarkably quaint. In Ludlow, one library is a white clapboard Victorian, slightly frayed, ringed by lilies and sitting by the side of a brook.

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Shots - Health News
10:06 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

You Ask, We Answer: More Of Your Questions About The Affordable Care Act

From left, Garrett Berntsen, Jennifer Majer and William Shields compare notes at The Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. Twenty-somethings have new choices under Obamacare.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:06 am

The Oct. 1 launch of the new health insurance exchanges is now less than two months away, and people are starting to pay attention to the changes these new marketplaces may bring to the nation's health care system.

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Code Switch
10:05 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Not Just A 'Black Thing': An Asian-American's Bond With Malcolm X

Kochiyama looks at a memorial for World War II Japanese-American internees at the Rohwer Relocation Center in Rohwer, Ark., in 2004.
Mike Wintroath AP

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 8:22 pm

The brief friendship of Malcolm X and Yuri Kochiyama began close to 50 years ago with a handshake.

Diane Fujino, chairwoman of the Asian-American studies department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, details the moment in her biography Heartbeat of Struggle: The Revolutionary Life of Yuri Kochiyama.

Kochiyama and her eldest son, 16-year-old Billy, were arrested along with hundreds of other people, mainly African-Americans, during a protest in Brooklyn, N.Y., in October 1963.

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Parallels
10:04 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Sun, Sand And The Seine: The Beach Comes To Paris

People enjoy the sun next to Pont Neuf bridge as "Paris Plage, or Paris Beach, opens along the banks of the Seine river in Paris, on July 20. The annual free event brings a half-mile of beach into the heart of the French capital.
Christian Hartmann Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 12:48 pm

It's a hot day in Paris and kids run in and out of giant sprinklers set up on the banks of the Seine river not far from Notre Dame cathedral at a place called Paris Beach, or Paris Plage.

Among the wet, excited children are the Obadjia sisters — 4-year-old Judith and 7-year-old Eve. The girls say they come to this magic place every year with their mother and brother, crossing town in a bus to get here.

"I love Paris Plage because we can watch the boats go by," says Judith.

"And when it's hot we can cool off here in the sprinklers," adds big sister Eve.

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Afghanistan
10:03 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

In Kabul, A Juggling Act That Offers Joy For Afghan Kids

Students at the Afghan Mobile Mini Circus for Children participate in the juggling parade on the streets of Kabul before Afghanistan's eighth annual national juggling championship last week.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:52 am

Morning traffic in Kabul can be punishing enough as it is. But on a recent day, there's an extra element clogging up the streets, a scene you don't see on a typical day in the Afghan capital.

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Europe
10:02 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Ai Weiwei Exhibit Shines Light On Time As Political Prisoner

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei's six iron boxes are part the 55th edition of the Venice Biennale of Arts in Venice, northern Italy. The work on display is called S.A.C.R.E.D. The four initials standing for supper, accuser, cleansing, ritual, entropy and doubt, and referring to Ai Weiwei time 81 days in detention in 2011.
Domenico Stinellis AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:52 am

Chinese dissident artist and architect Ai Weiwei is an outspoken critic of China's record on human rights. This year, Beijing prevented him from traveling to Venice for the first exhibition of a deeply autobiographical work. His most recent installation is an excruciatingly detailed depiction of the period he was held in solitary detention.

In a quiet corner close to a canal, Sant'Antonin is a typical 17th century Venetian church. But inside, the contrast between the paintings of old masters and the contemporary exhibit is stark.

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The Two-Way
9:40 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Has Voyager 1 Left The Solar System?

This artist rendering provided by NASA shows Voyager 1 at the edge of the solar system.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 9:52 am

The Voyager 1 spacecraft launched in 1977 on a mission to Jupiter and Saturn. It kept on going. Today it's billions of miles from Earth, and scientists have been predicting it will soon leave the solar system.

NPR has been on Voyager watch since at least 2003, when longtime science correspondent Richard Harris provided this warning of Voyager's impending departure.

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Around the Nation
12:07 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Cars In America: Is The Love Story Over?

Classic cars of all makes and models drive the 16-mile stretch along Woodward Avenue during the annual Dream Cruise in 2009 in Ferndale, Mich. During the annual event, the glory days of car culture return, if only for a day.
Jerry S. Mendoza AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 12:29 pm

Almost as soon as they started rolling off the assembly lines, automobiles became synonymous with freedom. And in the post-World War II boom our relationship with cars intensified.

It was about horsepower, status, being American, and for young people: rebellion. For generations cars inspired countless songs, books and movies. But now there are signs that our car culture is losing some of its shine.

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Author Interviews
12:06 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

A Dystopian View Of America's 'Fallen' Suburbs

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 1:03 pm

The suburbs can be a creepy place. And they are at their creepiest in Patrick Flanery's new novel, Fallen Land. Set outside an unnamed American city, this dark and complex thriller plays out in a half-built subdivision where construction ground to a halt during the housing crisis.

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Music
12:06 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

A Year After Its Debut, The Song 'Cups' Becomes A Hit

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 12:23 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CUPS GAME)

DON GONYEA, HOST:

Does that sound familiar? You may recognize "Cups" as a rhythmic game from your childhood or from the song "Cups" which is on Billboard's hot 100 as the number six song in the country right now.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CUPS")

ANNA KENDRICK: (Singing) When I'm gone. When I'm gone. You're gonna miss me when I'm gone.

GONYEA: That's Anna Kendrick in a version of the song from the movie "Pitch Perfect," which came out last year. Since then, it's blown up. Why is it so popular all of a sudden?

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The Two-Way
11:24 am
Sun August 18, 2013

U.S. Investigators Launch Probe Of JPMorgan Chase In China

The office of the locally incorporated JPMorgan Chase Bank in Beijing.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 11:49 am

The Securities and Exchange Commission has launched an investigation of JPMorgan Chase's operations in China, reportedly looking into whether the investment bank hired the children of high-ranking Chinese government officials in an effort to secure business.

The Wall Street Journal quotes from an SEC filing that says U.S. regulators are investigating "business relationships with certain clients."

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The Two-Way
10:12 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Penn State Reaches Settlement With First Of Abuse Victims

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky leaves the Centre County Courthouse in Bellefonte, Pa., after being sentenced in his child sex abuse case in October of last year.
Patrick Smith Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 10:43 am

A man who claimed sexual abuse by former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky has reached a multimillion-dollar settlement with the university, the first of numerous such claims expected to be resolved in the coming days.

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Shots - Health News
9:47 am
Sun August 18, 2013

What's My Real Cancer Risk? When Online Calculators Don't Compute

Whether or not you'll someday get cancer or any disease can feel like a roll of hundreds of dice. Calculating the odds --€” and knowing what they mean --€” is tricky.
Katie Harbath Flickr

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 6:31 am

Online risk calculators are all the rage these days among public health groups trying to get us to change our unhealthful ways. The World Health Organization developed an online tool that lets you estimate your personal risk of cracking a hip in the next 10 years, for example. You just plug in data about yourself, your lifestyle, and your family medical history.

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Books News & Features
9:22 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Fans Are Like Friends To 'Reigning Queen' Of Women's Fiction

Debbie Macomber's latest book is Rose Harbor in Bloom.
Deborah Feingold

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 1:12 pm

Go to your nearest paperback rack, and odds are, you'll see two or three, or four, or — well, a lot of books by Debbie Macomber, an author The Sacramento Bee has dubbed "the reigning queen of women's fiction."

Macomber has 170 million books in print; the newest, Rose Harbor in Bloom, has just been released. Her publisher, Random House, celebrated Macomber's selling power earlier this month with a fan retreat at the Gaylord Opryland resort in Nashville, where 400 women gathered for a weekend of tea, knitting and literary friendship.

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The Two-Way
8:47 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Koreas Set Talks To Resume Cross-Border Family Reunions

South Korean Kim Jung-Man, right, bids farewell to his North Korean relative before they return to their respective homes on opposite sides of the border in November 2010.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 11:14 am

North Korea has agreed to talks with the South to resume cross-border reunions of families separated for decades by the most militarized border in the world.

On Sunday, a spokesman for the Pyongyang's Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea, said it had agreed to talks, hosted by the Red Cross, that are to take place on Sept. 19 at North Korea's Diamond Mountain resort.

In the past, temporary thaws in bilateral relations have allowed some families separated by the 1950-53 Korean War to meet briefly at the border.

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The Two-Way
6:08 am
Sun August 18, 2013

China's Disgraced Politician Bo Xilai Goes On Trial This Week

Bo Xilai at the opening of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing March 2012, six months before his expulsion.
Feng Li Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 11:22 am

China's Bo Xilai, the one-time Communist Party chief of Chongqing who is accused of bribery, corruption and abuse of power, will go on trial this week in the culmination of a case that has highlighted wrongdoing in the top rungs of the country's political ranks.

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The Two-Way
4:42 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Scotland Yard 'Assessing' New Information In Diana Death

A photo taken in the Alma Tunnel in Paris on the night of Aug. 31, 1997, shows the smashed Mercedes in which Princess Diana and her companion Dodi Al Fayed were passengers.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 11:33 am

Scotland Yard says it is "assessing [the] relevance and credibility" of new information relating to the 1997 death of Princess Diana and her boyfriend Dodi Al Fayed in a Paris car crash.

The Metropolitan Police would not say what the information entailed or where it came from, but that it was "not a re-investigation" of the case.

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The Two-Way
3:34 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Philippine Navy Still Hopes For Survivors From Ferry Crash

A relative of one of the missing passengers writes down contact numbers on Sunday at the office of the ferry involved in a collision, in Cebu City.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 12:15 pm

Divers in the Philippines are making scant progress in their efforts to recover survivors — or bodies — from the scene where a ferry sank after colliding with a cargo ship near the central port city of Cebu.

About 35 people have been confirmed dead from MV Thomas Aquinas, which was carrying more than 800 passengers when it was struck late Friday and then sank within minutes.

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The Two-Way
3:07 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Egypt Tense After Bloody Crackdown On Protests

Mourners attend the funeral of Ammar Badie, son of the Muslim Brotherhood's Supreme Guide, at the Katameya cemetery in the New Cairo district on Sunday. Badie was killed in clashes with security forces.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 8:51 pm

This post was updated 1:00 a.m. ET Monday

The Egyptian government says at least 36 people were killed Sunday — Islamists who had been in custody of security forces, according to a report in The New York Times.

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Middle East
1:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Cairo Mosque Is A Protest Flashpoint

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 11:07 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. At least 800 people have been killed in Egypt since the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi last month and the subsequent protests launched by his supporters. Yesterday, a Cairo mosque was the scene of a struggle between police and soldiers and Morsi supporters who had taken shelter there.

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Middle East
12:29 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Obama Struggles To Find Effective Egypt Policy

President Obama delivers a statement on Egypt at his vacation home on Martha's Vineyard on Thursday.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 2:00 pm

The Obama administration is in a difficult situation with its Egypt policy.

President Obama, who often talks about free speech and human rights, has cancelled joint military exercises with Egypt but has stopped short of cutting off aid to the Egyptian military. As the violence continues in the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities, all sides seem unhappy with the U.S. approach.

In 2009, on his first trip to the Middle East as president, in the same year he won the Nobel Peace Prize, Obama spoke of a new approach to relations with the Islamic world.

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Parallels
12:29 am
Sun August 18, 2013

What's Next For Egypt: 3 Scenarios

Supporters of the deposed Egyptian president, Mohammed Morsi, carry an injured demonstrator who was shot during clashes in Ramses Square in Cairo on Friday. Dozens were killed nationwide in escalating violence.
AMR ABDALLAH DALSH Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 7:27 am

For two years, the conversation on Egypt centered on how to build a democracy. Suddenly the discussion has turned much darker, with some wondering aloud whether the largest Arab nation is hurtling toward civil war.

The bloody crackdown by Egypt's security forces has raised the specter of a protracted conflict pitting the military against the Muslim Brotherhood, the country's most powerful political force.

Egypt's escalating crisis is far too volatile for any declarative statements, analysts say. But here are three possible scenarios that could play out:

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Author Interviews
12:47 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

What Drove Wild West's Jesse James To Become An Outlaw?

Jesse James, seen here in his 1874 wedding portrait, fought in the American Civil War before he formed a gang and started robbing banks.
AP

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 12:57 pm

Tales of Jesse James's exploits have grown to almost mythological proportions since the actual man and his gang galloped over the plains stealing horses, holding up trains, and robbing banks in the years after the Civil War. Shot All To Hell: Jesse James, The Northfield Raid, and the Wild West's Greatest Escape is a new book about the legendary man.

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All Tech Considered
12:13 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Cracking The Code: Just How Does Encrypted Email Work?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 12:47 pm

If the past few months have taught us anything, it's that everything we do online leaves a digital trail. While it may seem like there's not much we can do about it, there are some tech companies that are working to obscure that trail a little bit, with a process known as encryption.

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It's All Politics
12:13 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Amid Struggle For 'Soul' Of GOP, Libertarians Take Limelight

Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan, a libertarian Republican, says recent surveillance leaks have "brought home" libertarian ideas.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:16 am

"There is no question that there is a civil war that is waging within the party."

That Republican conflict, political science professor David Cohen adds, isn't between just two sides, but among a number of factions, including libertarians.

One of the most public battles has involved national security and civil liberties. Leaks about the National Security Agency's surveillance programs raised alarms for libertarians about the government's reach.

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Music Interviews
12:13 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Irene Diaz: Crafting Songs In Dreamy Black And White

Irene Diaz's debut EP is titled I Love You Madly.
Miguel Morales Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 4:50 pm

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The Two-Way
11:58 am
Sat August 17, 2013

K.C. Royals' Miguel Tejada Suspended 105 Games For Drug Use

Royals infielder Miguel Tejada celebrates an RBI single against the Boston Red Sox last week at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo.
Ed Zurga Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 3:47 pm

Kansas City Royals infielder Miguel Tejada has been suspended by order of the commissioner of baseball after he was found to be in violation of Major League Baseball's drug program.

Marc Garber of member station WNYC says Tejada, 39, will get a 105-game suspension — one of the longest in major league history — after he reportedly tested positive on multiple occasions for Adderall, an amphetamine used to treat attention-deficit disorder.

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The Two-Way
11:22 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Fire Threatens Celebrity Resort Homes In Idaho

In this photo released by the U.S. Forest Service, firefighters stand watch near the perimeter of the Elk Complex fire near Pine, Idaho, earlier this week.
Uncredited Associated Press

An evacuation order in Idaho has been expanded to include 1,600 homes, including many in the resort community of Sun Valley, officials say.

The 100-square mile Beaver Creek Fire expanded rapidly on Friday, whipped up by 30 mph winds and low humidity, officials say.

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All Tech Considered
11:12 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Out Of The Comics, Into Reality: Jet Pack Moves Closer To Market

Standing on the center console of the Martin Jetpack, a pilot straps in and uses the joysticks to control flight.
Lee Howell Martin Aircraft Co.

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 1:45 pm

From Buck Rogers to James Bond, we all have a pretty concrete mental image of a jet pack — a motorized backpack with little handles in front and smoke shooting out of the back.

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Parallels
9:18 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Muslim Brotherhood: A Force Throughout The Muslim World

Crowds gather around the burning headquarters of the Muslim Brotherhood in Cairo on Oct. 27, 1954. The building was set on fire following the attempted assassination of President Gamal Abdel Nasser.
AP

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 11:10 am

The Muslim Brotherhood, which has a presence in dozens of Muslim countries, has been banned, repressed or restricted for much of its more than eight-decade history in Egypt, the place where it was born.

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