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The Two-Way
6:25 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Family Rescued In Pacific After Sailing 'Where God Led Us'

The Gastonguays hoped to reach the vast archipelago nation of Kiribati, part of which is shown in this 2001 photo.
Torsten Blackwood AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 9:59 am

A leap of faith that sent an Arizona family bound for the South Pacific in a sailboat has returned them in an airplane after a harrowing ordeal at sea that saw them adrift and nearly out of food in one of the remotest stretches of ocean on the planet.

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The Two-Way
4:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Israel OKs New Settlement Construction In West Bank

Chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erakat speaks to the media with Israel's chief negotiator and Justice Minister Tzipi Livni (left) and Secretary of State John Kerry in Washington on July 30.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 3:20 am

Israel's housing minister has given the green light to build 1,200 apartments in Jewish settlements in the West Bank, complicating newly revived peace talks with the Palestinians.

The decision comes as the two sides prepare for a second round of talks in Jerusalem after a high-level meeting in Washington, D.C., on July 31 — the first in five years.

The Associated Press writes:

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The Two-Way
2:57 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Police Rescue Teen, Kill Suspect In Idaho Wilderness

Authorities wait near a blackhawk helicopter at the Cascade Airport in Cascade, Idaho, on Saturday as they comb Idaho's Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.
Robby Milo Associated Press

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 11:13 am

An intense, week-long search for teenager Hannah Anderson and her alleged abductor ended in the Idaho wilderness when police shot and killed the suspect and rescued the girl.

Suspected kidnapper James DiMaggio, 40, was killed by an FBI agent after his campsite was discovered on Saturday in an aerial search of the rugged Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, about 40 miles from the town of Cascade, Idaho.

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Around the Nation
2:10 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Lottery Legend Has Seen A Lot Of Winning Tickets

In this 2011 photo, Tennessee Education Lottery President and CEO Rebecca Paul Hargrove and her finance officer, Andy Davis, stand after completing a presentation to a state Senate task force in Nashville.
Erik Schelzig AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:09 am

Life took a dramatic turn last week for 16 co-workers from a New Jersey town hit hard by Hurricane Sandy. The employees of a government garage in Ocean County reportedly have one of three winning tickets in the $448 million Powerball jackpot announced Wednesday.

Will their lives change for the better? Or will they end up like many lottery winners, losing the money, their relationships and their sense of self?

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Television
2:10 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Faux Meth Is Big Business In 'Breaking Bad' Town

Keith West and Andre Harrison created "Bathing Bad" bath salts, lotions and soaps, as well as Los Pollos Hermanos seasonings through their spa products company, Great Face and Body.
Megan Kamerick for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:09 am

On a hot summer afternoon in Albuquerque, N.M., the setting for the hit TV show Breaking Bad, a trolley that resembles a roving adobe house is packed with tourists.

The series follows Walter White, a chemistry teacher who turns to cooking methamphetamine to provide for his family after he gets cancer. The show, which begins its final season Sunday, has attracted critical acclaim, a slew of awards and rabid fans — some of whom have crammed onto the trolley for a tour of Breaking Bad filming sites.

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Art & Design
12:07 am
Sun August 11, 2013

These Dioramas Are To Die For

This "Die-O-Rama" features a picnic lunch of body parts.
Marty Walsh Courtesy of Trifecta Gallery

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:09 am

If you like mysteries, thrillers or zombie flicks, you'll probably like Abigail Goldman's art.

Goldman takes the fake grass, dirt and tiny plastic people used in model railroad layouts, and turns them into imaginary crime scenes. She's been making the macabre art for four years, and it's become so popular there's a waiting list for her work.

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The Salt
11:55 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

America, Are You Tough Enough To Drink Real Russian Kvas?

A man drinks fresh kvas, the ancient Russian fermented-bread drink, in Zvenigorod, 35 miles west of Moscow.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:09 am

While American kids stand in line for the ice cream truck on sweltering summer days, kids in Russia have historically queued up for something different: the kvas truck.

Kvas is a fermented grain drink, sort of like a barely alcoholic beer. And in the heat of the summer, it was served from a big barrel on wheels, with everyone lining up for their turn at the communal mug. It may sound like a far cry from rocket pops and ice cream sandwiches, but most Russians have fond memories.

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Shots - Health News
1:12 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Booze Restores Vigor, Nine Of 10 Charlatans Agree

When dealing with aches and pains, sometimes the best way to get better is to feel better — and fast. Some popular medicines of old favored additives like cocaine.
Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 3:05 pm

Feeling bilious? Have a swig of tonic. Got a kid with a toothache? A dab of cocaine tooth powder could do the trick.

Much to the shock of our 21st-century sensibilities, popular remedies of the late 19th century often contained strong mind-altering substances like cocaine and opium. And while patients may not have understood what the ingredients were or what they did, these heavy-hitting patent drugs could deliver a feeling of well-being, which may, in some cases, have led to actual well-being.

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Media
12:50 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

The Tricky Business Of Predicting Where Media Will Go Next

On Monday, the Washington Post Co. announced the sale of its newspaper to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, a move that comes as the paper struggles to keep up revenue.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 8:26 am

What's next for The Washington Post? With a new owner, the paper is stepping into a new era. Its path may lead to the ever-evolving future of journalism.

"There is no map, and charting a path ahead will not be easy," said Amazon founder Jeff Bezos with the announcement of his purchase Monday. "We will need to invent, which means we will need to experiment."

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Movie Interviews
12:50 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

'Lovelace': A Sex Superstar's Struggle To Show Herself

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 8:26 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

Coming up, we have a remembrance of actress Karen Black who made a name for herself in Hollywood during the 1960s and '70s. First, though, we turn to the silver screen for a look at another actress of the 1970s, Linda Lovelace.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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The Two-Way
12:17 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Wave Of Bombings At Ramadan's End Kills Dozens In Iraq

Smoke rises frome the scene of a car bomb attack in Kadhimiya, Baghdad, Iraq, on Saturday.
Associated Press

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 1:40 pm

At least 60 people are dead in Iraq after a wave of car bombs in mainly Shi'ite areas of Baghdad as Muslims observe the end of Ramadan, Eid al-Fitr. Scores more are reported wounded.

The attacks come amid an especially violent Ramadan for Iraq. The BBC reports that more than 650 people have been killed since the start of the annual Islamic fasting period. The news agency says in the latest attack, 11 bombs have ripped through cafes, markets and restaurants in at least nine different Baghdad districts.

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Arts & Life
12:10 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Audio As Art At New York Exhibit

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 8:26 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF ARPEGGIO)

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Arpeggios ricochet through three speakers and envelop us. We're on the modernist Bauhaus staircase at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, listening to techno-inspired electronica. This piece is part of a new exhibit, "Soundings: A Contemporary Score," that opens today.

BARBARA LONDON: I wanted work that pushed limits, pushed boundaries.

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Technology
12:10 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Technology's Role In Romance Dates To The Telegraph

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 8:26 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "CATFISH")

NEV: A couple of years ago, I fell in love online. Turns out my crush wasn't who I thought she was. I was heartbroken.

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

The MTV show "Catfish" looks into the anonymous world of online dating. It's a phenomenon in the news this year.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS SHOW)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Straight ahead, navigating the world of online dating. How to avoid getting hooked through a hoax.

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History
12:10 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Florida's Highwaymen Painted Idealized Landscapes In Jim Crow South

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 8:26 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

In the winter of 2012, I came across a story on a drive through central coastal Florida in the town of Fort Pierce. Route 1 is now dominated by strip malls and fading condos, but the Florida of the 1950s and '60s was a candy-colored Eisenhower, Kennedy space-age dream of flaming red Poinciana trees and untamed beaches.

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The Two-Way
9:46 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Russia Invites U.S. To A 'Tank Biathlon'

Russian tanks move along Red Square during a Victory Day parade in May. This week, Russia invited the U.S. to participate in a tank biathlon.
Ivan Sekretarev AP

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 3:14 am

Russia has invited the U.S. to participate in a tank biathlon so that both nations may learn to play nice — with heavy artillery.

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The Two-Way
9:12 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Volcanic Eruption In Indonesia Kills Six

Hindu devotees make an offering to the gods at the edge of a volcano during a festival in East Java in July. Indonesia is among the most volcanically active regions in the world.
Trisnadi Associated Press

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 9:47 am

Six people have been killed by lava and ash from an erupting volcano on a tiny island in Indonesia.

Authorities in Indonesia say that Mount Rokatenda, a volcano that had been rumbling since last year on the island of Palue, finally erupted, spewing ash and rock three miles into the sky.

The hot debris from the eruption covered a nearby beach, where four adults and two children were killed.

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Digital Life
7:24 am
Sat August 10, 2013

TED Radio Hour: The Hackers

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 2:43 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Time now for an idea worth spreading from the TED Radio Hour. What if there were a way to hack into your brain and make your life better. Neurosurgeon Andres Lozano is doing just that. He told host Guy Raz how.

DR. ANDRES LOZANO: We are able to adjust the activity of circuits in the brain by using electricity...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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The Two-Way
6:56 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Sheriff: Calif. Girl Rescued, Alleged Abductor Killed In Rural Idaho

A combination of undated file photos provided by the San Diego Sheriff's Department shows James Lee DiMaggio, 40, left, and Hannah Anderson, 16.
Uncredited Associated Press

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 4:13 pm

(Updated 8:40 p.m. ET)

Sixteen-year-old Hannah Anderson, the subject of a multistate police search, was rescued alive Saturday, and the suspect in her abduction was killed in rural Idaho, the San Diego County, Calif., sheriff announced Saturday.

"Hannah was successfully rescued, and appears to be in pretty good shape," said Sheriff William Gore at a news conference.

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The Two-Way
6:15 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Ex-Microsoft VP, Son Dead In Connecticut Plane Crash

The crash scene in East Haven, Conn., on Friday.
Fred Beckham Associated Press

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 9:58 am

A former Microsoft executive and his teenage son are among the dead after a small plane crashed into an East Haven, Conn., neighborhood a few blocks short of the airport.

Pilot Bill Henningsgaard and his teenage son, Maxwell, were in the 10-seater turbo-prop when it struck two small homes near Tweed New Haven Airport on Friday, killing as many as four people, according to The Associated Press.

The family learned it was Bill Henningsgaard's plane through the tail number, his brother, Blair Henningsgaard, said.

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The Two-Way
4:50 am
Sat August 10, 2013

San Diego Mayor Ducks Out Early From Harassment Therapy

San Diego Mayor Bob Filner arrives at a news conference on July 26 to announce his intention to seek professional help for sexual harassment issues.
Bill Wechter Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:14 am

San Diego's embattled Mayor Bob Filner is ending his two-week program of sexual harassment therapy — a week early, according to his lawyers.

Filner, 70, has resisted calls for his resignation after acknowledging that he behaved inappropriately toward women over the years.

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The Two-Way
3:35 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Protestants, Catholics Clash In Belfast; Dozens Hurt

Loyalist protesters clash with riot police in the center of Belfast, Northern Ireland, on Friday.
Peter Morrison AP

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 10:08 am

A confrontation between Protestants and Catholics in Belfast, Northern Ireland, erupted into violence overnight, injuring 56 police officers and two civilians.

"Belfast's main shopping district was turned into a battlefield last night as thousands of loyalists clashed with riot police to prevent a republican dissident rally passing down the city's main thoroughfare," The Guardian writes.

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Commentary
3:21 am
Sat August 10, 2013

The Doctor, An Utterly Millennial Hero

BBC

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 2:43 am

The selection last week of actor Peter Capaldi to play the latest Doctor on Doctor Who has made headlines all over the world — and you'd be forgiven for wondering why. It's only a TV show, after all, and it's a sometimes cheesy, often over-the-top sci-fi feature, not 60 Minutes or The West Wing.

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Science
2:46 am
Sat August 10, 2013

When Power Goes To Your Head, It May Shut Out Your Heart

Neuroscientists have found evidence to suggest feeling powerful dampens a part of our brain that helps with empathy.
Vladgrin istockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 4:52 am

Even the smallest dose of power can change a person. You've probably seen it. Someone gets a promotion or a bit of fame and then, suddenly, they're a little less friendly to the people beneath them.

So here's a question that may seem too simple: Why?

If you ask a psychologist, he or she may tell you that the powerful are simply too busy. They don't have the time to fully attend to their less powerful counterparts.

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StoryCorps
2:46 am
Sat August 10, 2013

How Two Veterans Helped Each Other With A Second Chance

Marine Cpl. Paul Wayman, left, and former Navy SEAL Nathanael Roberti met through a program in California that helps veterans readjust to civilian life.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 2:43 am

Marine Cpl. Paul Wayman and former Navy SEAL Nathanael Roberti met in 2012, after finding themselves in front of a special court for veterans.

The court takes into account the specific struggles that service members face, so the judge gave each of them a choice: go to prison, or enroll in a program that helps veterans readjust to civilian life.

They chose to go through the program, Veterans Village of San Diego, located in a California live-in facility.

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NPR Story
2:22 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Small-Market Teams Leading MLB Standings

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 2:43 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPORTS THEME MUSIC)

HEADLEE: We are rounding the corner toward Major League Baseball's homestretch. Some surprising names are up near the top of the standings: Pirates, Royals, Orioles all contending this year. They have a collective zero World Series titles since 1985 and it's not really a surprise. But I can't get through a sports interview without mentioning, of course, the beloved Detroit Tigers. They're in first place in the American League.

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NPR Story
2:22 am
Sat August 10, 2013

A Taste Of The Future Of Food

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 2:43 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Unless you've been hiding under a burger bun for the past week, you've probably heard the story about the lab-grown burger. The test-tube piece of meat took three months and cost more than $300,000 to grow, but its makers hope the experiment might help feed the world someday.

It's Morgaine Gaye's job to think about what we'll be eating in the future. She's a food futurologist, and she joins me now from our London bureau and she joins me now from our London bureau. Welcome.

DR. MORGAINE GAYE: Hello there.

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NPR Story
2:22 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Detroit's Uneasy Relations With Michigan

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 2:43 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee.

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Television
12:43 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Murder, Secrets And Lies By The Seaside In 'Broadchurch'

David Tennant plays Detective Inspector Alec Hardy alongside Olivia Colman as Detective Sergeant Ellie Miller, investigating the murder of a young boy in the BBC crime drama Broadchurch.
BBC

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 2:43 am

During the opening scene of Broadchurch, a new drama on BBC America, the camera lingers on a sign that reads "Love Thy Neighbour." But it must be pretty hard to 'love thy neighbor' when you know there's a murderer in your midst.

Broadchurch is also the fictional name of the idyllic looking English seaside town where the show is set. From afar, it looks like the perfect vacation spot — but up close the picture is quite different.

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Parallels
12:11 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Swiss Approach To Asylum-Seekers Stirs Controversy

The center for asylum-seekers in Bremgarten, Switzerland. There is controversy over rules in the town that would keep asylum-seekers away from public places.
Alesxandra Wey EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 7:16 am

Swiss officials are attracting attention with a plan in one town to segregate asylum seekers from the rest of the population.

The town of Bremgarten will ban them from entering public swimming pools, playing fields, libraries — even a church.

Mayor Raymond Tellenbach told German broadcaster ARD: "We have decided on security grounds not to allow access to these areas, to prevent conflict and guard against possible drug use."

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It's All Politics
12:11 am
Sat August 10, 2013

2014 Senate Math Favors Republicans But Primary Battles Loom

U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) greets supporters during the 133rd Annual Fancy Farm Picnic in Fancy Farm, Ky., Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013.
Stephen Lance Dennee AP

Republican dreams of a U.S. Senate takeover have been shattered in recent elections by a collection of "unelectable" nominees — the term of art used by political pros to refer to not-ready-for-prime-time candidates whose extreme views doomed their chances with mainstream voters.

There was Delaware's Christine "I'm Not A Witch" O'Donnell, and Nevada's Sharron "Some Latinos Look More Asian To Me" Angle in 2010.

Last year's contests starred Indiana's Richard "Rape Pregnancies Are A Gift From God" Mourdock, and Missouri's Todd "Legitimate Rape" Akin.

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