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Law
6:47 am
Mon July 8, 2013

New Voting Laws: Forward-looking Or A Step Back?

Several state legislatures are moving to amend voting laws after a controversial Supreme Court decision limited enforcement of the Voting Rights Act. Host Michel Martin gets an overview of the future of voting rights across the states.

Parallels
6:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Retailers Sign Pact On Bangladesh Factory Inspections

A Bangladeshi worker participates in a protest outside a garment factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Sunday. Hundreds of garment workers demanded better conditions.
A.M. Ahad AP

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 8:36 am

We've been following the story of the collapse in Bangladesh of a building that housed several factories where clothes were made for Western retailers. More than 1,000 people died in that disaster in April, and the incident shed light on working conditions in Bangladesh, the world's No. 2 exporter of clothing.

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The Two-Way
6:21 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Trapped In Trees By Tigers, Men Rescued After Five Days

A Sumatran tiger at the Sumatra Tiger Rescue Center near Bandar Lampung on the southern tip of Sumatra island
Beawiharta Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:01 pm

Five days after they fled up into trees to escape a streak* of at least four Sumatran tigers, five men were rescued Monday in the wilds of Gunung Leuser National Park on Indonesia's Sumatra Island.

According to the BBC, dozens of rescuers were able to drive the tigers away so that the men could come down.

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The Protojournalist
6:13 am
Mon July 8, 2013

The Life Of Paula Deen: In A Four-Course Menu

Cooking show host Paula Deen visits FOX Studios in December.
Slaven Vlasic Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 10:19 am

Appetizer: Hogs In A Sleeping Bag

These hearty kielbasas, partially hidden in puff pastries, represent Paula Deen's first catering company The Bag Lady — begun in 1989. It offered "lunch and love" ... in a bag.

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Around the Nation
5:47 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Why Catastrophic Airline Crashes Have Become More Survivable

National Transportation Safety Board officials handed out this photo of the burnt shell of Asiana Flight 214 during their first assessment of the crash. Two people died Saturday and scores more were injured.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 8:06 am

The Boeing 777 that crash-landed in San Francisco has one of the best safety records in the industry. In addition to the plane's solid reputation, many other factors helped save lives in Saturday's crash — from fire-rescue training to aircraft design.

If you look at pictures of the gutted, charred fuselage of Flight 214, you'd wonder how anybody made it out alive. All but two of the 307 passengers and crew survived. Both people killed were teenage girls from China.

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The Two-Way
5:01 am
Mon July 8, 2013

It Was A 'Horrific Honor' To Recover 19 Firefighters' Bodies

On Sunday in Phoenix, the 19 bodies of firefighters killed while battling a wildfire in central Arizona were driven to Prescott, where the "hotshot" team was based.
Christian Petersen Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 7:20 am

"I don't want strangers going in and getting them out of there. I want to be the one that gets to go in there and get them out of there. It's a horrific honor to go in and do that."

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The Two-Way
3:48 am
Mon July 8, 2013

'Devastated' Quebec Town Waits For Word About Missing

Comforting each other: A group of young women in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, on Sunday. People there are waiting to hear the fate of 40 people still missing after Saturday's train derailment and the massive explosions that followed.
Mathieu Belanger Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:53 pm

With 40 people still missing after massive explosions Saturday in the center of their town, the people of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, begin the week "with fears that the death toll from a weekend rail disaster could surge," CBC News writes.

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The Two-Way
3:14 am
Mon July 8, 2013

10 Killed In Crash Of Alaska Air Taxi

Police and emergency personnel stand near the remains of a fixed-wing aircraft that was engulfed in flames Sunday at the Soldotna Airport in Alaska.
Rashah McChesney Peninsula Clarion

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 9:11 am

One of the worst civilian aviation accidents in the state in at least 25 years killed all 10 people aboard an air taxi in Alaska on Sunday, the Anchorage Daily News writes.

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Heavy Rotation
3:09 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

Heavy Rotation." href="/post/heavy-rotation-10-songs-public-radio-cant-stop-playing-0" class="noexit lightbox">
Download Valerie June's "Workin' Woman Blues" in this month's edition of Heavy Rotation.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 11:31 am

  • WWNO's Gwen Thompkins on "Ballet Class" by Jason Marsalis

Another month, another great mix of new music chosen by public radio's top DJs. Download an explosive new track from Neko Case, discover the Shabazz Palaces-approved Seattle rapper Porter Ray and get to know Valerie June, one of public radio's frontrunners for Best New Artist of 2013. Grab all 10 of our picks below, as chosen by the following contributors:

  • Chris Campbell, DJ at WDET's ALPHA channel in Detroit
  • Lars Gotrich, producer and host of Viking's Choice at NPR Music
  • Anne Litt, DJ at KCRW in Los Angeles
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The Two-Way
2:48 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Dramatic Crash Video Among Latest Clues In Asiana Accident

Asiana Flight 214, a Boeing 777 aircraft, after Saturday's crash at San Francisco International Airport.
NTSB/Contra Costa Times MCT/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 7:19 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Richard Gonzales reports

"Oh my God ... oh my God ... oh my God."

That was plane spotter Fred Hayes' reaction Saturday as he videotaped what turned out to be the crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco.

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The Two-Way
2:01 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Book News: Reading And Writing Slow Dementia, Study Says

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:46 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
1:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Indiana State Fair To Feature Giant Popcorn Ball

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. In China it's the Year of the Snake. In Indiana, it's the year of popcorn. This year's state fair will feature, what else, a giant popcorn ball. A company called Snax in Pax is using a mold that's eight-feet wide. Owner Will Huggins says it will be edible but he doesn't recommend taking a bite. Maybe because it'll be a little stale.

Around the Nation
1:41 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Volunteers Sought For 1813 Flag Project

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

The Fourth of July weekend is over, but celebrations continue, and I'm not talking about left-over fireworks. The Maryland Historical Society is recreating the flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore 200 years ago. Mary Pickersgill and four others sewed the original Star Spangled Banner in 1813. Now volunteers will recreate it using the same type of fabric, stitching and time frame. They have six weeks to complete the 30-by-40 foot flag.

The Two-Way
1:39 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Dozens Killed By Shots Fired At Pro-Morsi Gathering In Cairo

A wounded man is helped from the scene Monday in Cairo after shots were fired during a protest against the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi.
Mohammed Saber EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 1:44 am

(This post was last updated at 5:45 p.m. ET.)

An already dangerous, volatile situation turned even deadlier early Monday in Cairo when dozens of people were killed at a protest outside the Republican Guard facility where it's believed ousted President Mohammed Morsi is being held. Most of those who died are reported to have been among a large group of Morsi's supporters.

Update at 5:45 p.m. ET. Date Set For Egypt's Election

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Music
12:01 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Vibraphone Showcased In Jason Marsalis' 'Ballet Class'

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:03 am

Each month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities at member stations across the country to tell us about a song they can't get enough of. David Greene introduces listeners to member station WWNO's Gwen Thompkins — she's NPR's former East Africa correspondent. Her choice for July's installment of "Heavy Rotation," is "Ballet Class" by the Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet.

Sports
12:01 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Britain's Own Andy Murray Wins Men's Title At Wimbledon

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

People in Britain are celebrating a new Wimbledon tennis champion this morning, a man born on their own soil.

(APPLAUSE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Game, that's a match...

GREENE: That's early applause from the crowd yesterday, just before Andy Murray won in straight sets beating Novak Djokovic. Murray's victory ends 77 years of heartbreak. The last Brit to win the Wimbledon men's title: Fred Perry in 1936.

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Education
12:01 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Congress Called On To Reverse Student Loan Rate Increase

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 9:02 am

Rates on federally subsidized Stafford loans, which help low and middle-income college students, doubled on July 1. There is now pressure for a deal to undo the increase. NPR's David Greene talks to Matthew Chingos, a fellow at the Brookings Institution's Brown Center on Education Policy.

Parallels
10:52 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

EU-U.S. Trade: A Tale Of Two Farms

Farmer Richard Wilkins, a firm believer in genetically modified crops, examines the corn crop at his farm in Greenwood, Del. U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement. One stumbling block is agriculture. Unlike the U.S., the EU bans the cultivation of genetically modified crops.
Jackie Northam/NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 9:12 am

U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement aimed at generating billions of dollars of new trade. But negotiators must overcome barriers created by cultural and philosophical differences over sectors like agriculture. In Europe, the cultivation of genetically modified crops is banned, while in the U.S., they are a central part of food production. NPR's Jackie Northam visited a farm in Delaware and NPR's Eleanor Beardsley visited one in Burgundy, France, to look at those deep-seated differences. We hear from Jackie first.

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Shots - Health News
10:42 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Finding Simple Tests For Brain Disorders Turns Out To Be Complex

Anne Jones, 62, and Robin Jones, 73, at their home in Menlo Park, Calif. He took a test that revealed proteins typical of Alzheimer's disease.
Ramin Rahimian for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 8:17 am

If you're having chest pain, your doctor can test you for a heart attack. If you're having hip pain, your doctor could test for osteoarthritis.

But what if you're depressed? Or anxious? Currently there are no physical tests for most disorders that affect the mind. Lab tests like these could transform the field of mental illness. So far efforts to come up with biomarkers for common mental health disorders have proved largely fruitless.

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Parallels
10:41 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Call Centers Call On Multilingual Portuguese

New employees train for call center work at Teleperformance Portugal, an outsourcing company in Lisbon. The outsourcing industry is adding thousands of jobs while other Portuguese industries shed them.
Jose Faria Courtesy of Teleperformance Portugal

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 8:04 am

Filipa Neves speaks five languages but still couldn't find steady work in her native Portugal. So she was about to move to Angola, a former Portuguese colony in Africa, where the economy is booming.

But she sent off one last resumé — to a call center. It was sort of a last resort. She'd heard the stereotype.

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Author Interviews
1:31 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

How 'Dancing In The Street' Became A Protest Anthem

In November 1964, Betty Kelly, Martha Reeves and Rosalind Ashford (aka Martha Reeves and the Vandellas) were at the top of the charts with their hit "Dancing in the Street."
AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:37 am

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The Two-Way
12:36 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

For Pilots, Most Landings Are 'Routine' Procedure

This aerial photo shows the wreckage of the Asiana Flight 214 airplane after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport on Saturday.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:37 am

Two Chinese teenagers were killed and dozens of other passengers were injured when an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777's tail snapped off and the plane struck the ground just short of the runway on Saturday. Dramatic landings like this are ones commercial pilots hope to never encounter as they guide the hundreds of planes safely to the ground each day.

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Around the Nation
11:58 am
Sun July 7, 2013

New Handicapped Sign Rolls Into New York City

In the beginning of their project, Sara Hendren and Brian Glenney stuck their new design over existing handicapped signs around Boston.
Darcy Hildreth

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:37 am

The handicapped sign is getting a new look — at least in New York City.

The initial design, created in 1968, depicted a person with no head in a wheelchair. The sign has changed since then — the figure eventually got a head — and now it's trying something new.

Sara Hendren, a Harvard graduate design student, is co-creator of a guerrilla street art project that replaces the old sign with something more active.

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Theater
11:58 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Broadway's 'First Date': A Greek Chorus Of Emotional Baggage

Krysta Rodriguez played Ana Vargas in the recently canceled backstage-on-Broadway TV series Smash, and Zachary Levi earned a fervent following in the title role of NBC's Chuck. Both performers have backgrounds in the theater, and they'll be together on Broadway this summer in the premiere of the musical comedy First Date.
Matthew Murphy

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:37 am

Many fans of the TV show Chuck fell in love with the nerd-turned-unwitting spy at the heart of the show, but most probably didn't know that he could sing.

Zachary Levi is now rehearsing for his first role on Broadway — a new musical comedy called First Date — which also features Krysta Rodriguez, the star of another NBC program, Smash.

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The Two-Way
11:57 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Russian Lawmaker: Venezuela May Be Last Chance For Snowden

A prominent member of Russia's parliament is adding to pressure on former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden to leave Russia.

AS NPR's Corey Flintoff reports, Alexei Pushkov, the head of the foreign affairs committee in Russia's parliament, said on Twitter that Venezuela is waiting for an answer from Snowden, adding that this might be the 30-year-old computer analyst's last chance to receive asylum.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Britain Deports Radical Cleric To Jordan

Muslim Cleric Abu Qatada arrives home after being released from prison in London on Nov. 13, 2012.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Britain has deported a radical Muslim cleric top his homeland, Jordan, where he appeared in court Sunday and was formally charged with terrorism-related offenses.

Abu Qatada was first arrested in Britain in 2001 over alleged terrorist links. He was rearrested in 2005.

The 53-year-old cleric was held at a prison in southeast London, and was taken from there to the airport at midnight Sunday. The BBC reports that he was accompanied on the flight by "six people from Jordan, comprising three security officials, a psychologist, a medical examiner and his Jordanian lawyer."

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Mob Brutally Kills Soccer Referee After Player Is Stabbed And Killed In Brazil

Brazilian police have made an arrest in a grisly incident during a soccer match, in which a referee's leveling of a red card penalty set off a clash with a player that resulted in the player's death and ended with the official being brutally killed.

The killings occurred during an amateur game last Sunday, June 30, in Maranhão, a state in Brazil's northeast that is west of Recife.

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The Two-Way
7:52 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Murray Beats Djokovic To Win Men's Title At Wimbledon

Andy Murray broke Britain's more than seven-decade men's title drought Sunday, beating top seed Novak Djokovic in straight sets.
Anja Niedringhaus AP

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 8:17 am

Andy Murray broke Britain's more than seven decade men's title drought at Wimbledon on Sunday, beating top seed Novak Djokovic in straight sets.

Murray won 6-4, 7-5, 6-4 in a hard-fought 3-hour, 9-minute match, which the Associated Press noted, was "filled with long, punishing rallies and a final game that may have felt like another 77 years, with Murray squandering three match points before finally putting it away after four deuces."

Here's more from the AP:

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The Two-Way
6:37 am
Sun July 7, 2013

BBC, Radio Announcer Apologize To Wimbledon Champ Bartoli

France's Marion Bartoli celebrates her Wimbledon women's singles championship. The BBC has apologized to Bartoli for remarks an announcer made about her appearance.
Dominic Lipinski PA Photos/Landov

The BBC and one of its radio tennis commentators are apologizing to Marion Bartoli, after announcer John Inverdale's remarks about the 2013 Wimbledon champion's appearance angered many listeners.

Bartoli, 28, reached a milestone in her life Saturday, by winning the women's singles final at Wimbledon. And that's the perspective she kept after learning of Inverdale's unflattering remarks, in which he suggested that her father might have told Bartoli that she needed to work hard to overcome the fact that she was "never going to be a looker."

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