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Law
3:12 am
Sat December 13, 2014

Yale Law Professor: Torture Is Never Justified

Originally published on Sun December 14, 2014 5:27 pm

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Law
3:12 am
Sat December 13, 2014

NYT Reporter: Brutal Interrogations Rose In CIA's Post-9/11 Chaos

Originally published on Sun December 14, 2014 11:21 am

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National Security
3:12 am
Sat December 13, 2014

Holder Won't Force NYT Journalist To Reveal Source

Originally published on Sat December 13, 2014 9:21 am

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Politics
3:12 am
Sat December 13, 2014

Levin, Harkin, Coburn Among Senators Bidding Adieu

Originally published on Sat December 13, 2014 9:21 am

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Asia
3:12 am
Sat December 13, 2014

Hong Kong Protesters Leave The Streets, Not Their Cause

Originally published on Sat December 13, 2014 9:21 am

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Goats and Soda
2:03 am
Sat December 13, 2014

A Michel Du Cille Disciple Remembers His Late, Great Boss

A boy lies on a mattress on the floor of Redemption Hospital, a holding center for Ebola patients in Monrovia, Liberia.
Michel du Cille The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat December 13, 2014 11:18 am

The friends and colleagues of Michel du Cille are in shock. They simply can't believe that the photographer with the deep voice and the gentle soul is gone. He died on Dec. 11 of an apparent heart attack while covering the Ebola crisis in Liberia for the Washington Post.

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The Salt
12:19 am
Sat December 13, 2014

Hanukkah History: Those Chocolate Coins Were Once Real Tips

Wrapped in gold and silver foil, chocolate gelt are often handed out as a little treat for children (and adults) during Hanukkah. Turns out, the tradition is rooted in real money.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue December 16, 2014 9:09 am

Hanukkah, the Jewish festival of lights, starts on Tuesday night. But the flickering candles won't be the only things shining on the table. Many families celebrate with gelt, chocolate coins covered in gold and silver foil. But while this treat is beloved, it's not all that delicious.

"It snaps. It's not soft and buttery — it's waxy. This is chocolate you have to chew," jokes Ariel Cohn, who runs Tree of Life, a Jewish pre-school in Portland, Ore.

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Parallels
12:19 am
Sat December 13, 2014

Syrian Women Displaced By War Make Tragedy Of 'Antigone' Their Own

Mona, 28, narrates during a rehearsal of Antigone. "I feel that Antigone resembles me a lot," says the former resident of Damascus and mother of two.
Dalia Khamissy for NPR

Originally published on Sat December 13, 2014 9:21 am

Barefoot in a yoga studio in Lebanon's capital Beirut, a couple dozen actresses raise voices and stretch bodies that had grown used to being quiet and still.

"Go on," they cry as a clapping exercise speeds up, and they fill the room with whoops and uninhibited yells.

But these women aren't professional actresses. In fact, they're refugees from Syria, and this production of the Greek tragedy Antigone is a project designed to help them deal with their trauma.

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All Tech Considered
12:18 am
Sat December 13, 2014

Tech Week: Instagram Vs. Twitter And Europe Vs. Google

Instagram topped Twitter in active users in its latest count.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

If you've been too busy finalizing holiday vacation plans and buying gifts, we're here to catch you up on the tech headlines you may have missed from NPR and beyond.

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The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

Are Men Idiots Who Do Stupid Things? Study Says Yes

Charles Darwin, perhaps best known for his work on evolution, died at the age of 73 in 1882. He would not have been a candidate for the Darwin Awards.
AP

A new study shows what at least some of us might have suspected for a long time: Men are idiots and do stupid things.

That's the premise of the authors' Male Idiot Theory. The study, published in BMJ, the former British Medical Journal, looked at past winners of the Darwin Awards. The awards are given to those people who die in such an idiotic manner that "their action ensures the long-term survival of the species, by selectively allowing one less idiot to survive."

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Economy
1:21 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

Mortgage Giants Ease Down Payments For First-Time Homebuyers

A new directive from the Federal Housing Finance Agency, which regulates mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, will allow first-time homebuyers to put down as little as 3 percent.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 3:05 pm

A federal directive will go into effect Saturday making it easier for some Americans to come up with a down payment to buy a house.

The vast majority of home loans are guaranteed by the government-controlled mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The regulator in charge of Fannie and Freddie will allow first-time homebuyers to put down as little as 3 percent.

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Around the Nation
1:11 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

Do Guns On The Premises Make Workplaces Safer?

In 2010, Omar Thornton killed eight colleagues in Manchester, Conn., before killing himself. Private employers used to create their own rules about guns on their property. But over the past five years, many states have adopted laws that allow employees to keep firearms in their vehicles at work.
Douglas Healey Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 15, 2014 3:49 am

This year, Tennessee joined 21 other states that allow employees to leave guns in their cars in the office parking lot. The laws have left many employers debating how best to ensure safety at work.

After Georgia passed its law allowing employees to keep firearms in their employers' parking lots, Sally Roberts installed a sign on her newspaper firm's door. It read: "No Weapons Allowed."

A job candidate once threatened her, says Roberts, human resources director at Morris Communications. "She did become violent, and I'm very thankful she did not have a weapon."

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Sports
1:03 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

How Good Can Young NFL Quarterbacks Really Be?

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 1:16 pm

n.

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This Week's Must Read
1:03 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

The Ethics Of Torture, Explored In A Painful Fable

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 2:29 pm

We've been hearing all week about a report released by the Senate Intelligence Committee. It detailed brutal interrogation techniques used by the CIA after Sept 11. Among the questions it raised are whether these techniques are legal, effective and morally acceptable.

For our series This Week's Must Read, author Laila Lalami grapples with these questions by turning to literature.

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The Two-Way
12:04 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

3 Wounded In Shooting Outside Portland High School

Originally published on Sun December 14, 2014 10:37 am

Updated at 5:00 p.m. ET

A shooter wounded two boys and a girl outside a high school in Portland, Ore., in what police said may be a gang-related assault.

The incident occurred near Rosemary Anderson High School. The Oregonian reports that a 17-year-old was shot in the back and another person, a female, was shot in the chest. The newspaper did not give specifics on the third victim.

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Politics
11:53 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Outgoing Rep. Mike Rogers Reflects On Congressional Career

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 1:16 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
11:48 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Dingell Admitted To Hospital, One Day After Casting Last Vote In House

Rep. John Dingell, seen here in June, was admitted to a hospital Friday as a precautionary measure. The Democrat is retiring as the longest-serving member of Congress in U.S. history.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Rep. John Dingell, the longest-serving member of Congress in history, was admitted to a hospital in Washington, D.C., as a precaution Friday, one day after casting the final vote in his nearly 60 years in Congress.

The Michigan Democrat's office didn't give details on Dingell's condition, other than to say he was under observation and "resting comfortably." Dingell visited a doctor's office earlier this week, after he fell down and bruised his hip.

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Remembrances
11:40 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Photojournalist Michel Du Cille Chased The Tough Stories

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 1:16 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
11:35 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Tamir Rice's Death Ruled A Homicide By Medical Examiner

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 12:24 pm

The death of Tamir Rice, the 12-year-old Cleveland boy who was shot last month by a police officer, has been ruled a homicide by the Cuyahoga County medical examiner.

Tamir suffered gunshot wounds to the torso and suffered injures of "major vessel, intestines and pelvis," the examiner's report said.

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Religion
11:31 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Hanukkah's Real (And Imagined) History

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 1:16 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Television
10:07 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Even If Torture Doesn't Work In The Real World, TV Has Us Convinced It Does

Kiefer Sutherland (right) with Peter Weller and JoBeth Williams on Fox's 24.
Fox TV

As the CIA and Senate Intelligence Committee clash over whether so-called enhanced interrogation techniques are considered torture, another question arises: Have depictions of torture on TV and film helped convince us that it works?

Consider this warning that recently greeted viewers of ABC's political soap opera, Scandal:

"The following drama contains adult content. Viewer discretion is advised."

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The Two-Way
9:36 am
Fri December 12, 2014

NOAA Team Finds Shipwreck Of The 'Titanic Of The Golden Gate'

A sonar profile view of SS City of Rio de Janeiro above a painting of the steamer.
Coda Octopus (top) and painting of SS City of Rio De Janeiro NOAA (top); Mystic Seaport (bottom)

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 12:49 pm

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says it has found the remains of a 19th century passenger steamer that sank near the present-day Golden Gate Bridge at the entrance to San Francisco Bay, killing 128 people, mostly immigrants from China and Japan.

Inbound from Hong Kong, the City of Rio de Janeiro, which came to be known as the "Titanic of the Golden Gate," went down in dense fog after hitting submerged rocks early on the morning of Feb. 22, 1901.

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The Two-Way
8:46 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Vatican, Citing 'Delicate Situation,' Rejects Dalai Lama Meeting With Pope

The Dalai Lama, flanked at left by Rome's Mayor Ignazio Marino, arrives at the opening of the World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates in Rome on Friday.
Alessandra Tarantino AP

Originally published on Mon December 15, 2014 3:48 am

Pope Francis won't meet privately with the Dalai Lama because of a "delicate situation," the Vatican's spokesman said today, in an apparent reference to the Holy See's relations with China.

The Dalai Lama, who is in Rome for a meeting of Nobel Peace Prize winners, had requested a private meeting with the pontiff but said Thursday that the request had been rejected.

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Shots - Health News
8:43 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Confusion Over Job-Based Insurance Can Shortchange Consumers

Originally published on Mon December 15, 2014 2:20 am

Misunderstandings about whether some types of job-based coverage disqualify consumers from signing up for subsidized insurance through the health law's marketplaces may lead some people to buy skimpier employer plans instead.

In recent weeks, some of the people called assisters, who help shoppers find coverage, say consumers are being told by employers that their bare-bones plans meet the minimum requirements under the law. That kind of insurance would cover preventive benefits, for instance, but might leave out prescription drugs and emergency care.

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The Two-Way
8:29 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Coming Soon To Iowa: Driver's License On A Smartphone App

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 12:07 pm

A smartphone app will soon serve as an official driver's license for many Iowans.

"We are really moving forward on this," Paul Trombino, director of the state's Department of Transportation, told Gov. Terry Brandstad during an agency budget hearing this week. "The way things are going, we may be the first in the nation."

His comments were reported by The Des Moines Register.

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The Salt
8:28 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Florida Tomato Pickers' Wins Could Extend To Dairy, Berry Workers

Farm workera at Lipman Produce load tomatoes on a truck on Jan. 16, 2014 in Naples, Fla. Wal-Mart Stores Inc. joined an initiative that will require its Florida tomato suppliers to increase farm worker pay and protect workers from forced labor and sexual assault, among other things.
Wilfredo Lee AP

Originally published on Sat December 13, 2014 6:10 am

Farm workers in America have long been among the nation's poorest paid and most abused workers. But conditions have been improving for Florida tomato pickers, and those advances may soon reach other farm fields, according to the annual report released Thursday by the Fair Food Standards Council, or FFSC, a labor oversight group based in Sarasota, Fla.

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The Two-Way
7:54 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Wealth Gap Between Races Widened During Recession, Study Says

Occupy Wall Street protesters join a labor union rally in Foley Square before marching on Zuccotti Park in New York's Financial District in 2011. A new report shows that wealth inequality between whites and nonwhites grew during the Great Recession.
Jason DeCrow AP

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 10:50 am

The Great Recession has widened the wealth gap among white, black and Hispanic Americans, with median net worth in white households increasing to 13 times that for African-Americans, a new Pew Research Center study shows.

The study also shows that from 2007 to 2013, the wealth of white households has grown to 10 times that of Hispanic households.

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The Salt
6:56 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Aerial Photos Are New Weapon In Organic Civil War

The Cornucopia Institute commissioned this photo of an organic egg producer in Saranac, Mich. According to Cornucopia, the facility is owned by Herbruck's Poultry Ranch, which has a license to maintain up to 1 million chickens on this site.
Courtesy of The Cornucopia Institute

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 1:11 pm

If you look at it one way, these are the best of times for organic egg and milk producers. They can barely keep up with demand. Prices for their products are high. Profits are rolling in. Operations are expanding.

But that expansion is provoking suspicion, name-calling, and even clandestine investigations within the organic "community" because some organic advocates believe that some of these megafarms are not truly organic.

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The Two-Way
6:40 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Lost Disney Film, Featuring Oswald The Lucky Rabbit, Found In Norway

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit
The Walt Disney Co. AP

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 10:34 am

Before Mickey Mouse, there was Oswald the Lucky Rabbit.

Only 25 seconds of Empty Socks, a Walt Disney cartoon featuring Oswald, was thought to exist. But archivists at Norway's National Library conducting an inventory at the library's vault in Mo i Rana, in the Arctic Circle, found an almost complete version of the film.

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NPR Ed
6:32 am
Fri December 12, 2014

Big Drop In Students Being Held Back, But Why?

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 10:24 am

The question of when or whether it's appropriate to hold a child back in school is a heated one among teachers, parents and even politicians.

And a new study is adding some kindling to the debate.

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