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The Two-Way
4:36 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Here She Is: Statue Of Liberty Reopens On Independence Day

She's open for visitors again.
Reena Rose Sibayan The Jersey Journal/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 5:37 am

It's an even more notable July 4th this year on Liberty Island in New York Harbor, where the Statue of Liberty is open for the first time since Superstorm Sandy pummeled the Mid-Atlantic region last fall.

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The Two-Way
3:59 am
Thu July 4, 2013

VIDEO: Toledo Driver Rescued After Huge Sinkhole Swallows Car

After a day's worth of heavy news from Egypt, let's take a quick break with something completely different.

Wednesday in Toledo, a sinkhole opened up under driver Pamela Knox's Chevy Malibu, and the aftermath of the vehicle's drop beneath the ground produced some impressive videos.

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Around the Nation
3:53 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Stars, Spangles And Lots Of Security At Boston's July 4 Events

Mary Ann Rollings (from left), Gloria Kelley and Linda Lee Stacy were bursting in red, white and blue as they turned out to hear their beloved Boston Pops.
Courtesy of Sammy Stalcup

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 8:43 am

The Fourth of July show will go on as usual tonight in Boston. For the 40th year in a row, the Boston Pops will perform along the banks of the Charles River as fireworks burst overhead.

But the scene and the mood will be different, with heavy security measures in the wake of the recent Boston Marathon bombings. It's in the back of many people's minds that the July 4 celebration was apparently the original target until, police say, the bombers decided to attack the race instead.

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Code Switch
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

A BBQ Rub That Tastes Like Brooklyn

The spices were created by analyzing recipes and correlating ingredients with census data.
Courtesy of Hanna Kang-Brown

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:02 am

The Fourth of July is America's favorite holiday to get together, grill barbecue, and celebrate what it means to be American. It's also probably our best opportunity to debate whose barbecue is the best. With its regional varieties, the rubs-vs.-sauce debates and the fiercely guarded recipe secrets, arguing about barbecue is almost an American pastime. Few foods better demonstrate the diversity of our country.

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The Two-Way
3:00 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Egypt Begins Dangerous New Phase As Interim Leader Steps In

People dance and cheer in Cairo's Tahrir Square on July 4, the day after former Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was ousted from power.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:09 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson in Cairo
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Around the Nation
2:47 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Park Service Cleans Up Eggs In Death Valley

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 4:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
2:21 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Strike In Oakland Causes Parking Meter Confusion

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 4:48 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. You ever sense a smile on the face of people who write your parking tickets, as if they enjoy calling you out for letting your meter expire? When Oakland, California cities employees went on a one day strike, residence thought that meant no parking enforcement. But one parking officer decided to cross the picket line and write tickets. He said he was happy with his pay and didn't want to go on strike. Employee of the Month, no, the city said all of the tickets he wrote would be voided.

Around the Nation
12:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

The Declaration: What Does Independence Mean To You?

Kara, Michael, Mikaila and Cameron Milton of Greensboro, N.C., pose for a portrait near the Lincoln Memorial on June 21, after reading the Declaration of Independence for Morning Edition.
Erica Yoon NPR

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 4:48 am

We often celebrate Independence Day with backyard barbecues and fireworks, forgetting the document that started this whole country: the Declaration of Independence.

For the past 20 years Morning Edition has asked NPR hosts and reporters to read the document on the Fourth, as a reminder of our country's history. This year, we decided to ask visitors at the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to give it a try.

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Law
12:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Zimmerman Trial Takes July 4 Off, Case Resumes Friday

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 4:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's get an update now on the Trayvon Martin murder case being held in Sanford, Florida. The state is expected soon to wrap up its case against George Zimmerman. He's the neighborhood watch volunteer who shot and killed the unarmed teenager. In a week and a half of testimony, prosecutors have painted a picture of Zimmerman as a wannabe cop, someone who profiled Trayvon Martin and then, after he shot Martin, tailored his story to fit Florida's self-defense law.

NPR's Greg Allen reports.

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Race
12:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Mexican Roots Bind Families Who Settled Early In Texas

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 12:19 pm

Unlike many places in America where Latinos are a relatively new minority group, Texas Hispanics were there before white Anglos. In some ways, having once been part of Mexico has lessened the tensions between whites and Latinos. But that's not always the case.

(For an extended version of this story, along with a gallery of images, visit KERA's website: Latino Roots Run Deeper In Texas.)

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Business
12:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

SoftBank Moves Closer To 78 Percent Stake In Sprint

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 4:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the Federal Communications Commission has apparently approved a deal giving the Japanese telecom giant SoftBank a controlling stake in SprintNextel, which is the third-largest wireless operator in the U.S. Experts say SoftBank's industry clout should help Sprint become a more robust competitor. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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Remembrances
11:01 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Douglas Engelbart Dies At 88, Invented Computer Mouse

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 4:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And a remembrance, now. The, a computer visionary best known for inventing the mouse has died. As NPR's Laura Sydell reports, the mouse was just one small piece of what Douglas Engelbart contributed to the development of personal computers.

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Author Interviews
10:09 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

For 'Star-Spangled Banner,' A Long Road From Song To Anthem

American lawyer Francis Scott Key witnessed the bombardment of Fort McHenry from a boat about 8 miles away.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 4:48 am

All over the country on Thursday, fireworks will light up the sky. In many places, those fireworks will come with a patriotic soundtrack — one that wouldn't be complete without "The Star-Spangled Banner." The song officially became America's national anthem in 1931, but it's been around since the early 19th century.

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Those Who Serve
10:08 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

From Front-Line Soldier To Trainer, An Afghan Odyssey

ANA soldiers plot coordinates on a map with the help of their American trainers.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:55 am

This report is part of "Those Who Serve," an occasional series that looks at those who wear the military uniform during a time of war.

It's early afternoon at a small outpost in eastern Afghanistan, and U.S. Army Sgt. Chris Cunningham, with the 10th Mountain Division, heads into a long, dusty tent to teach Afghan soldiers the basics of map reading.

After the sun sets, American soldiers help Afghan soldiers outside the wire. They pop artillery shells containing what's called an illumination round.

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It's All Politics
10:07 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Immigration Debate In Congress Riles Up Texas Republicans

Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas delivers remarks during a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting to work on the immigration legislation in May.
Michael Reynolds EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 4:48 am

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic shifts that could shake up Texas politics in the coming years — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Within a decade, Hispanics are bound to become the largest ethnic group in Texas. These often Democratic-leaning Texans could reshape the state's GOP-dominated political landscape.

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The Two-Way
2:26 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

President Obama: U.S. 'Deeply Concerned' Over Morsi's Ouster

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 1:39 am

Saying the United States is "deeply concerned by the decision of the Egyptian Armed Forces to remove President Morsy and suspend the Egyptian constitution," President Obama calls on Egypt's military to preserve the rights and safety of its citizens.

As we've reported in our main post about today's dramatic ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, the military coup could mean that the U.S. will reduce or cease the flow of aid to Egypt.

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Middle East
2:25 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

With Turmoil In Egypt, Obama Urges All To 'Avoid Violence'

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:38 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

President Obama said tonight that he is deeply concerned by the situation in Egypt where the military has suspended the constitution and removed Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi from office. Mr. Obama said the U.S. is monitoring what he called a very fluid situation, and he urged the military to return authority to a democratic government as quickly as possible.

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The Two-Way
1:43 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Morales Returns To A Latin America Fuming Over Plane Snub

A man burns the French flag outside France's embassy in La Paz, Bolivia, Wednesday. Bolivia's President Evo Morales is returning home late today, after his plane was not allowed to fly in the airspace of France and other countries.
Juan Karita AP

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 8:12 am

Bolivian President Evo Morales is scheduled to land in his home country late tonight, a day after his return journey from meetings in Moscow was disrupted when several European nations withdrew permission for his plane to fly through their airspace.

The delay of more than 13 hours reportedly stemmed from suspicions that Edward Snowden, the former U.S. intelligence worker who leaked secret data, might have been aboard the plane.

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Space
1:39 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Why You Can't Name New Moons And Planets Anything You Want

This artist's illustration shows Pluto and one of its moons, Charon. A global consortium of astronomers sets the rules for naming things like asteroids and moons throughout the solar system.
Detlev van Ravenswaay Science Source

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:38 am

A dispute over the names of two new moons of Pluto is highlighting a broader battle over who names what in our solar system and beyond. On one side is the International Astronomical Union (IAU), a venerable consortium of astronomers who have set the naming rules for the better part of a century. On the other side, a growing number of astronomers who feel the IAU has unfairly designated itself as the intergalactic naming police.

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Around the Nation
1:34 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Gettysburg Swells As Throngs Mark Civil War's Turning Point

Men dressed as members of the Union infantry demonstrate battalion formations for tourists.
Chris Connelly NPR

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 12:15 pm

About three dozen men dressed in Confederate Army uniforms woke Wednesday morning on historical campgrounds at the iconic Gettysburg battlefield. Soggy from the night's rain, they warmed themselves by the fire and cooked up bacon and potatoes.

The re-enactors joined hundreds of others camping out to show visitors what life may have been like for Civil War soldiers. It's part of a huge display the National Parks Service is putting on to mark the Battle of Gettysburg's 150th anniversary.

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It's All Politics
1:21 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Partial Delay In Health Law Challenges Obama More Than Foes

The Affordable Care Act's foes have long had a simpler message than its supporters. The postponement of the law's employer mandate continues that trend.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

It's too soon, obviously, to know how the Obama administration's decision to delay by a year the imposition of penalties on large employers that fail to provide health insurance to their workers will ultimately play out, politically.

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Parallels
12:02 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Egypt's Military Reasserts Its Enduring Power

Military special forces surround supporters of President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo on Wednesday. A few hours later, the military ousted Morsi and suspended the constitution.
Hassan Ammar AP

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 12:37 pm

Egypt's military has played a dominant role in the country since a 1952 coup, and Wednesday's ouster of President Mohammed Morsi showed that the armed forces still feel empowered to intervene when they disapprove of the country's course.

"They are the center of gravity in the Egyptian state," said Jeffrey Martini, a Middle East analyst at the Rand Corp. in Washington, speaking shortly before the coup on Wednesday night. "They are the strongest player in the game."

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Shots - Health News
11:52 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Scientists Grow A Simple, Human Liver In A Petri Dish

"Liver buds" grow in petri dishes. The rudimentary organs are about 5 mm wide, or half the height of a classic Lego block.
Courtesy of Takanori Takebe/Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 4:48 am

Japanese scientists have cracked open a freaky new chapter in the sci-fi-meets-stem-cells era. A group in Yokohama reported it has grown a primitive liver in a petri dish using a person's skin cells.

The organ isn't complete. It's missing a few parts. And it will be years --maybe decades — before the technique reaches clinics.

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It's All Politics
11:47 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Democrats Want To Mess With Texas? GOP Says Not So Fast

A Texas delegate on the floor of the Republican National Convention in 2012.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:38 am

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Democrats see opportunity in Texas' fast-growing Latino population. But the Republican Party is strong in Texas — very strong.

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Around the Nation
11:47 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Arizona Firefighter Remembered For Loving His Job

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 2:25 pm

In Arizona, friends and family of the 19 firefighters killed in the Yarnell Hill Fire are sharing their memories.

Around the Nation
11:47 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Federal Budget Cuts Hamper Summer Firefighting Efforts

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 2:13 pm

The wildfire season is expected to intensify and firefighters are facing it with decreasing resources. Federal budget cuts, including the sequester, mean fewer firefighters, less equipment and less spending on prevention.

Middle East
11:47 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Pakistan's New Prime Minister Gets No 'Honeymoon Period'

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:38 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's been four weeks since Pakistan's new Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif took the oath of office. In that time, Pakistan has suffered a wave of militant attacks, an economically crippling electricity crisis, and now a deadly drone strike. Many Pakistanis deeply resent U.S. drone attacks against targets in their tribal belt bordering Afghanistan. Recently, there's been a lull in these, but overnight a fresh missile strike killed at least 17 people.

NPR's Philip Reeves reports.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Inventor Of Computer Mouse Dies; Doug Engelbart Was 88

This early version of the mouse (named for its tail-like cord) was assembled by Douglas Engelbart and his Stanford team in 1963.
Getty Images/Life

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 2:20 pm

U.S. inventor Doug Engelbart, the man known as the father of the computer mouse and a thinker who helped introduce other key innovations, died Wednesday morning at age 88. His death was announced today by the Computer History Museum.

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Shots - Health News
11:27 am
Wed July 3, 2013

A Surge In Painkiller Overdoses Among Women

Drugs found in the medicine chest are claiming more women's lives than cocaine and heroin.
Mark Gabrenya iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:52 am

Women are dying from overdoses of prescription painkillers at a much higher rate than men, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And while men still suffer more overdoses, women are catching up fast.

From 1999 to 2010, the CDC found a fivefold increase in the number and rate of such cases among middle-aged women. Over the same period, the rate of overdoses from prescription painkillers increased 3.5 times in men.

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Parallels
11:18 am
Wed July 3, 2013

The Hopeful Arab Spring Turns Into A Roiling Arab Summer

Protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi wave flags in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Wednesday. Shortly afterward, the military staged a coup, ousting Morsi and suspending the constitution.
Mohamed Abd El Ghany Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 11:42 am

Two years ago, the Arab Spring was a fountain of hope. Autocratic leaders whose rule was measured in decades were suddenly ousted, raising the possibility of political, economic and social change in a region that was lagging.

But with a coup in Egypt on Wednesday and Syria's civil war raging, the widespread optimism in the spring of 2011 has turned into fears of chaos during the summer of 2013.

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