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The Two-Way
9:11 am
Thu June 27, 2013

WATCH: Rep. Tammy Duckworth Dresses Down IRS Contractor

Tammy Duckworth questions an IRS commissioner.
YouTube

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 1:19 am

It is one of those rare Congressional exchanges that's both dramatic and compelling: Yesterday during a House Oversight Committee hearing, Rep. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.), who lost her legs and use of her right arm when she served in Iraq, dressed down an IRS contractor who used his military disability status to receive government contracts reserved for disabled vets.

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Boston Bombing Suspect Indicted; Could Face Death Penalty

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:19 am

A federal grand jury handed down a 30-count indictment against the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing today. Dzohkhar Tsarnaev is scheduled to be arraigned in U.S. District Court in Boston on July 10.

The charges against Tsarnaev, 19, include killing four people and using weapons of mass destruction, the U.S. Attorney's office in Massachusetts announced on its Twitter feed. The attacks also injured more than 250 people.

Update at 3:10 p.m. ET.

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The Two-Way
8:37 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Joyous 'Bedlam' Expected When San Francisco Gay Marriages Resume

Bernice Frucht, 80, found what proved to be the ideal retirement job through a want ad. In 20 years, she's conducted something like 7,500 weddings.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 8:58 am

Bernice Frucht performed San Francisco's last same-sex marriage in 2008. She finished just under the wire.

As she's done for the past 20 years, Bernice was conducting weddings at City Hall as a volunteer deputy marriage commissioner at the time. Officials there were awaiting instructions following passage of Proposition 8, which outlawed same-sex marriage in California.

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The Salt
8:07 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Moonshine As Moneymaker? Eastern Tennessee Will Drink To That

Ole Smoky has helped revitalize the local economy in Gatlinburg, Tenn. The distillery sources its corn, jars and other packaging locally, and employs more than 150 people.
Van Gallik Courtesy of Ole Smoky

Moonshine is trendy these days, with distillers large and small throughout the country offering up their own variety. But in eastern Tennessee, locals will tell you they've got the real "white lightning." Everyone seems to boast a family connection, and everyone has his or her own recipe.

"It's a local point of pride, a big part of eastern Tennessee family tradition," says Robert Cremins, a college student from Knoxville. Many in the region identify themselves with moonshine, Cremins tells The Salt. "I grew up hearing stories about moonshine."

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Shots - Health News
7:53 am
Thu June 27, 2013

A Look At The Nastiest And Cleanest U.S. Beaches

Lazy day summer beach goers relax on the sands of Rehoboth Beach in Delaware.
Ted Van Pelt Flickr

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 11:54 am

From California to the Great Lakes, persistent water pollution shows that no beach is an island when it comes to public health threats like hepatitis, dysentery and stomach flu.

The Natural Resources Defense Council released its annual beach report card Wednesday detailing the levels of bacteria hanging around beaches across the nation.

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The Two-Way
7:49 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Florida A&M Lifts Suspension Of 'Marching 100' Band

Members of the Marching 100, Florida A&M University's marching band, perform before the Super Bowl in Feb. 2010.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 8:50 am

Florida A&M's interim president announced Thursday that he was lifting the suspension of the school's famed "Marching 100" band.

The band had been suspended since November 2011, following the hazing-related death of one of its drum majors.

In a statement, interim President Larry Robinson said the re-institution of the band comes after "sweeping changes" that address hazing.

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The Two-Way
6:58 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Court Overturns Murder Conviction Against Camp Pendleton Marine

Cpl. Marshall Magincalda, Jr.
Hector Mata AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:44 am

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces has overturned the murder conviction of a Marine sergeant found guilty of killing an Iraqi civilian.

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Around the Nation
6:20 am
Thu June 27, 2013

A Fond Farewell To Talk Of The Nation

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Now it's time for a segment we call Wisdom Watch, that's where we hear wisdom from someone who's made a difference with his or her work and life. Today, we're going to speak with someone who surely fits that bill. Twelve years ago, Neal Conan took to the airwaves as the host of NPR's Talk of the Nation.

(SOUNDBITE OF TALK OF THE NATION)

NEAL CONAN, BYLINE: From NPR News in Washington, D.C., I'm Neal Conan and this is Talk of the Nation.

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Law
6:20 am
Thu June 27, 2013

SCOTUS: What Else Happened This Term?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Monkey See
6:12 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Why Paula Deen Can't Be A 'Food Network Star'

Seen here in 2009, Paula Deen recently lost her ongoing deal with Food Network.
Katy Winn AP

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 1:17 am

It's not the least bit surprising that Paula Deen lost her gig on The Food Network — and you don't have to believe she's a terrible person to know it. All you have to do is watch Food Network Star, the competition show that seeks a new network personality and sometimes finds one.

That's where they got Aarti Sequeira, who now hosts the Indian food show Aarti Party. It's where they got Aaron McCargo, Jr., who hosts Big Daddy's House. And Melissa d'Arabian, who hosts Ten Dollar Dinners, and Jeff Mauro, who calls himself "The Sandwich King."

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Africa
5:38 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Nelson Mandela Said To Be Gravely Ill

South Africa is on watch for the fate of the 94-year-old Nobel Peace Prize laureate. The ailing Mandela, an international icon known for his fight to end apartheid, has been in the hospital for several days. For the latest on his condition, Renee Montagne speaks with NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton.

Parallels
5:23 am
Thu June 27, 2013

The Day Nelson Mandela Walked Out Of Prison

Nelson Mandela, with his wife, Winnie, walks to freedom after 27 years in prison on Feb. 11, 1990, in Cape Town.
AP

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 2:19 pm

One of the most remarkable days of Nelson Mandela's extraordinary life was Feb. 11, 1990, when he walked out of prison after 27 years behind bars. Greg Myre, the international editor of NPR.org, covered Mandela's release for The Associated Press and recounts that day.

The evening before his release from 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela was ushered into a secret meeting with South African President F.W. de Klerk for a conversation that sounded straight from the theater of the absurd.

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The Two-Way
4:39 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Obama: NSA Leaker Edward Snowden Has More Documents

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:12 am

During a news briefing in Senegal, President Obama said NSA leaker Edward Snowden was in possession of more classified documents and that the government did not know "what other documents he may try to dribble out there."

That said, the president added that he will not "be scrambling jets to get a 29-year-old hacker."

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Shots - Health News
4:24 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Test-Driving The Obamacare Software

Hit return for health coverage.
iStockphoto.com

All the outreach in the world won't count for much if the Obamacare ticket counter doesn't work.

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The Two-Way
3:38 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Book News: Arthur C. Clarke's DNA Headed For A New Space Odyssey

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 3:43 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
2:15 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Mandela's Daughter: 'It Doesn't Look Good'

A man holds a picture as people gather to leave messages of support for former South African President Nelson Mandela outside the Mediclinic Heart Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:59 am

Nelson Mandela's condition is "very critical," his daughter Makaziwe Mandela told South African broadcaster SABC.

"I reiterate that Tata is very critical, that anything is imminent," said Makaziwe. "But I want to emphasize again that it's only God who knows when the time to go is. So we will wait with Tata. He's still giving us hope by opening his eyes, he's still reactive to touch, we will live with that hope until the final end comes."

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The Two-Way
1:37 am
Thu June 27, 2013

President Obama Begins Weeklong Africa Trip

President Obama reviews an honor guard on Wednesday outside the presidential palace in Dakar, Senegal.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 7:41 am

Arriving in Senegal on Wednesday night, President Obama kicked off a weeklong trip to Africa. NPR's Ari Shapiro, who is traveling with the president, tells our Newscast desk that Obama will emphasize democracy and security during his visit.

Ari filed this report from Dakar:

"The streets here in Dakar are full of posters proclaiming, 'Welcome Obama.'

"They show the U.S. president next to Senegal's recently elected president, Macky Sall. The posters almost make it look like the two are running mates in a campaign.

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Around the Nation
12:46 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Expecting Parents Ask For Help Naming Their Son

A Connecticut couple couldn't decide whether to name their soon-to-be-born son Jackson or Logan. So according to the New Haven Register, they decided to take a poll of customers at Starbucks. In the end, they went with their own suggestion: Logan Jackson.

World
12:41 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Racing Pigeon Has Poor Sense Of Direction

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

A pigeon that set out on what was to be a 600-mile race in Japan lost his way, and ended up landing 5,000 miles across the Pacific in Canada. When it was found on Vancouver Island, the bird was exhausted and very skinny. Now he's been adopted by a pigeon racing club there. They're considering breeding the bird, figuring his offspring will be just as resilient, though hopefully the young ones will get their sense of direction from the mother.

Law
11:21 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Gay Military Spouses To Benefit From Supreme Court Ruling

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 12:01 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. The Supreme Court ruling yesterday on the Defense of Marriage Act will change the lives of many people, including some in the U.S. military. Gay spouses of service members have long been denied the substantial benefits available to heterosexual couples. Yesterday's ruling that struck down DOMA means gay married couples can look forward to more equal treatment from the Pentagon, as NPR's Larry Abramson reports.

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Business
11:04 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Walgreens Cashes In On Department Stores' Pain

Customers check out at the new flagship Walgreens in Washington, D.C.'s Chinatown.
Brenda Salinas NPR

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 8:21 am

At the turn of the 20th century, drugstores were little more than a pharmacist and a soda fountain. If you wanted to go shopping, you went to a department store.

Now, that trend is reversing. Department stores are suffering and drugstores are booming.

So much so that Walgreens — one of the industry's leaders — is experimenting with expanding its goods and services.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
11:04 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Six Words: 'Black Babies Cost Less To Adopt'

Caryn Lantz and her husband Chuck were surprised to learn that costs associated with adopting black children were much lower than for white or mixed race children. They ultimately went with an adoption in which the fee was based on their income, not skin color.
Courtesy of Caryn Lantz

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 4:46 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition. You can find hundreds of six-word submissions and submit your own at www.theracecardproject.com.

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Environment
11:04 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

This Climate Fix Might Be Decades Ahead Of Its Time

Global Thermostat's pilot plant in Menlo Park, Calif., pulls carbon dioxide from the surrounding air. The next challenge is to find uses for the captured gas.
Courtesy of Global Thermostat

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:35 am

Every year, people add 30 billion tons of carbon dioxide to the air, mostly by burning fossil fuels. That's contributing to climate change. A few scientists have been dreaming about ways to pull some of that CO2 out of the air, but face stiff skepticism and major hurdles. This is the story of one scientist who's pressing ahead.

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The Salt
11:04 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Coffee Futures: The Highs And Lows Of A Cup Of Joe

Want to invest in coffee futures? One roaster says when it comes to the price of coffee, it "is like a roller coaster."
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 7:49 am

NPR's Uri Berliner is taking $5,000 of his own savings and putting it to work. Though he's no financial whiz or guru, he's exploring different types of investments — alternatives that may fare better than staying in a savings account that's not keeping up with inflation.

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Business
11:04 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

$99 Game Console Ouya Aims To Take Down Barriers To Fans

The Ouya game console and controller. Games are sold through something like an app store, allowing customers to sample them before buying.
Courtesy of Ouya

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 7:37 am

Sony and Microsoft are preparing to launch their latest gaming consoles this fall with price tags from $400 for the PlayStation 4 and $500 for the Xbox One. But this week, a $99 game console went on sale and sold out at Target and Amazon.

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Business
11:04 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 12:49 am

New York City became the most populous place in the United States to require businesses to give employees paid sick leave. Mayor Michael Bloomberg had previously vetoed this requirement, but has now been overruled by the City Council.

The Two-Way
7:03 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

As People Head Into Space, PayPal Says It Will Follow Them

No Free Doughnuts, Even In Space: PayPal is announcing a project with SETI, aiming to solve issues around taking regular people — and commerce — into space. Here, an artist's rendering of a space hotel, from the Space Tourism Society.
John Spencer Space Tourism Society

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 7:48 am

Many people know how to buy things in cyberspace. But what about doing business in outer space? That's the question PayPal says it wants to answer. Citing the looming era of space tourism, the company is creating the PayPal Galactic project along with the SETI Institute, "to help make universal space payments a reality."

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The Two-Way
2:28 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Man Indicted In Scheme To Blackmail Romney Over Tax Returns

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 3:02 pm

A Tennessee man faces federal charges after a grand jury indicted him on counts of fraud and extortion, in a case stemming from claims made about tax documents of Republican Mitt Romney during last year's presidential campaign.

Michael Mancil Brown of Franklin, Tenn., is accused of attempting to carry out fraud and using "a facility of interstate commerce, to wit the Internet," to do so.

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It's All Politics
2:11 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Same-Sex Marriage Fight Shifts Back To States

Allan Hoyle of North Carolina (center) protests gay marriage outside the Supreme Court.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 3:35 pm

The dual victories the Supreme Court handed to gay-marriage supporters Wednesday seemed to temporarily shift the focus of the fight from Washington to the states.

For instance, one of the more notable reactions to the Supreme Court decisions overturning the Defense of Marriage Act and upholding a lower court ruling that blocked California's Proposition 8 from taking effect came from the American Civil Liberties Union.

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Parallels
2:06 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Amid Construction Boom, Migrants Flow Into Brazil

Construction is underway on the Itaquerao stadium in Sao Paulo, shown here June 12. The stadium will be the venue for the opening ceremony and game of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil, and many migrants are among the laborers working on the project.
Sebastiao Moreira EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 12:34 am

Brazil is in the midst of a building boom as it constructs stadiums across the country in preparation for the World Cup it will host next year. In Sao Paulo, hundreds of workers are building a massive arena that will take many more months to complete.

But not all of the workers are Brazilian.

Marie Eveline Melous, 26, arrived from Haiti just a few months ago because life was so difficult, especially after the huge earthquake in 2010. "It's hard to find work. I came to Brazil to help my situation," she says.

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