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The Changing Lives Of Women
7:47 am
Sun April 21, 2013

An Exploration Of The Changing Lives Of Women

Graphic designer Kaleena Porter sits with her dog, Moby, in the living room of her new home in Washington, D.C.
Marie McGrory NPR

Many revolutions begin with the sound of explosions and marching boots.

Now, another revolution is shaking up the world, and it's moving forward to the beep of alarm clocks and the clack of heels heading out.

Legions of women around the world are leaving their homes to join the paid labor force. Worldwide, 4 in 10 paid workers are female; in the coming decade, an estimated 1 billion more women will enter the formal workforce, pushing up economic growth.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Miranda Rights And Tsarnaev: Ex-U.S. Attorney General Weighs In

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 11:06 am

Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has not yet been questioned — but officials' decision not to read him his Miranda rights before interrogation is the subject of much debate.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
7:02 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Tragedy In Real Time: Living A Terrible Week, Vicariously

In Texas, veteran Bill Warren lowers a flag to half-staff in memory of victims from the West Fertilizer Co. explosion last week. The nation has absorbed the past six days of nonstop tragedy and relief in a firsthand-once-removed way that now defines our communal experiences.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 3:54 am

We have imagined ourselves searching like Kelly Manning for loved ones after the explosions on Boylston Street.

We have pictured ourselves huddling in the basement like Beth and Paul Robinson and their four children as bullets and bombs fly on our own city street.

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The Two-Way
6:36 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Sunday Night Forecast: Cloudy With A Chance Of Meteors

Another meteor shower, the Geminid, sparkled over the Spanish canary island of Tenerife on Dec. 13, 2012.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 6:49 am

Keep your eye on the sky Sunday evening; the Lyrid meteor shower is expected to peak. It's the first meteor shower of the spring season.

The Lyrid shower is caused by Earth passing through the orbit of a comet known as Thatcher, though the comet itself hasn't been seen since 1861. Dust particles from the comet will be seen as flashes of light as they burn up in our atmosphere.

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The Two-Way
4:47 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Boston Update: Officials Wait To Question Suspect; Memorial Held Sunday

People gather at a makeshift memorial for victims of the Boston Marathon bombings at the edge of the still-closed section of Boylston Street. The surviving suspect in the case, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, remains in the hospital.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 3:26 am

(Most recent update: 4:20 p.m. ET)

Investigators are still waiting to interview Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, whose wounds reportedly include injuries to his neck and leg. An official tells CNN that Tsarnaev has been "intubated and sedated," rendering him unable to speak with them.

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The Two-Way
4:46 am
Sun April 21, 2013

London Marathon Marked By High Security, Memories Of Boston

London Marathon runners stand in a silent, pre-race tribute Sunday to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings. The police presence was increased for the London event.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 10:24 am

The London Marathon observed 30 seconds of silence before the race got underway Sunday, in a show of solidarity with the victims of Monday's attack at the Boston Marathon. Many runners and spectators wore black ribbons to honor the three people killed and the more than 170 injured in two bombings.

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National Security
2:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Boston, Bombs And Lessons From Israel

Workers repair the Cafe Hillel in front of candles for the victims of a suicide attack in west Jerusalem on Sept. 10, 2003. Eight people, including the bomber, died and several dozen were wounded by the explosion that went off near the popular cafe.
Pedro Ugarte AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 4:50 am

As reporters in Jerusalem a decade ago, my wife, Jennifer Griffin, and I covered more than 100 suicide bombings over several blood-soaked years. The carnage defined our lives as we raced to blast sites, interviewed battered survivors in emergency rooms and tracked down the extremists behind the deadly attacks.

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Middle East
2:38 am
Sun April 21, 2013

New Aid To Syria Comes With Fear Of Funding The Wrong Opposition

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry listens in during a "Friends of Syria" group meeting hosted on Saturday in Istanbul, Turkey.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 4:09 pm

At an 11-nation meeting in Turkey this weekend, there was one thing the United States, European and Arab states could agree on: With more than 70,000 killed and millions of people displaced, the Syrian crisis, as Secretary of State John Kerry says, is "horrific."

In response, the Obama administration is doubling its non-lethal assistance to the Syrian opposition, Kerry announced at the meeting.

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Law
12:12 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Thirsty States Take Water Battle To Supreme Court

A dispute over Texas' access to the Kiamichi River, which is located in Oklahoma, has started a longer legal battle that is headed to the Supreme Court.
Joe Wertz for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 8:39 am

On Tuesday, Oklahoma and Texas will face off in the U.S. Supreme Court. The winner gets water. And this is not a game.

The court will hear oral arguments in the case of Tarrant Regional Water District v. Herrmann, et al. The case pits Oklahoma against Texas over rights to water from the river that forms part of the border between them. Depending on how the court decides, it could impact interstate water-sharing agreements across the country.

Keeping Up With Texas

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The Two-Way
2:06 pm
Sat April 20, 2013

Boat's Owner Hailed As A Hero After Bombing Suspect Tsarnaev Is Found

An infrared photograph taken from a police helicopter shows Tsarnaev in the boat's cockpit.
Massachusetts State Police

Watertown, Mass., resident David Henneberry's name was on many people's lips Saturday, as the hero who called police to say bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev might be hiding in his back yard. Massachusetts State Police have now released images that show what the authorities saw from a police helicopter as a wounded Tsarnaev hid under a tarp.

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Music Interviews
1:50 pm
Sat April 20, 2013

Phoenix On Sounding Like Robots And Staying Restless

Phoenix's latest album is called Bankrupt! Left to right: Thomas Mars, Laurent Brancowitz, Christian Mazzalai, Deck d'Arcy.
Courtesy of the artist

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NPR Story
1:50 pm
Sat April 20, 2013

For Public Safety's Sake: What Are Suspects' Rights?

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

With the manhunt now over, officials are thinking about the next steps: interrogation and prosecution. And NPR's counterterrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston is here with the latest on that. Dina, thanks for coming in.

DINA TEMPLE-RASTON, BYLINE: You're welcome.

LYDEN: Dina, so the Department of Justice has announced that they aren't going to be reading Dzhokhar Tsarnaev his rights right away. Can you tell us more about that?

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NPR Story
1:50 pm
Sat April 20, 2013

Racing Again, Boston Marathon Medalist Stops To Pause

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

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NPR Story
1:50 pm
Sat April 20, 2013

From Family To Digital Footprints: A Portrait Of Tsarnaevs

NPR's Daniel Zwerdling reports on what's known about the two brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon bombing, Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

NPR Story
1:50 pm
Sat April 20, 2013

The Week In News: Boston Captures National Attention

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LYDEN: An intense week that opened with deadly bombings and was capped off with a dramatic arrest.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Americans refuse to be terrorized. Ultimately, that's what we'll remember from this week.

LYDEN: That's President Obama speaking to the nation in his weekly radio address. James Fallows of The Atlantic joins us, as he does most Saturdays. Hello there, Jim.

JAMES FALLOWS: Hello, Jacki.

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The Two-Way
11:51 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Watertown Residents Cheer Being 'Liberated' By Bomb Suspect's Arrest

Residents cheer police as they exit Franklin Street, where suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was taken into custody Friday night. The manhunt for Tsarnaev and his brother, who died early Friday, put the Boston area on edge in the wake of Monday's bomb attack at the Boston Marathon.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

After days spent living in a cloud of apprehension and fear following Monday's bomb attack at the Boston Marathon, the city's residents celebrated the capture of suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on Friday night. He was caught hiding in a boat in the backyard of Watertown resident David Henneberry.

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The Two-Way
10:21 am
Sat April 20, 2013

The Tsarnaev Brothers: What We Know About The Boston Bombing Suspects

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, suspected of carrying out the bombing attack on the Boston Marathon, was taken prisoner Friday. Here, he poses for a picture after graduating from Cambridge Rindge and Latin High School.
Robin Young AP

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 10:43 am

With Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in police custody at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and his brother and fellow suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev dead after a shootout, many questions now focus on how these two young men arrived at this point.

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The Two-Way
9:24 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Boston Bombings Point To Growing Threat Of Homegrown Terrorism

U.S. Army Maj. Nidal Hasan is charged with a 2009 killing spree that killed 13 people at Fort Hood in Texas. Homegrown terrorism by Muslim Americans has been growing over the past decade.
HO AFP/Getty Images

U.S. security officials have been warning for years that one of their biggest challenges is detecting homegrown terrorists — extremists who grow up in America, or have lived here for years, know the customs, speak the language, blend in easily and can fly below the radar of law enforcement.

As details of Boston bombing suspects emerge, reports point to two young men of Chechen origin who had been in the U.S. for up to a decade and were seemingly fully integrated into American society.

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Around the Nation
8:57 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Forget NCAA Titles, This School Dominates Spoken Word

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

While many universities try to win national attention with their sports programs, one school is dominating a lesser-known competitive arena: speech teams. Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., will defend its U.S. title again this weekend at the National Forensic Association tournament in Huntington, W.Va. Jonathan Ahl reports.

JONATHAN AHL, BYLINE: Cecil Blutcher is on stage, practicing his poetry recitation in front of his fellow speech team members.

CECIL BLUTCHER: Now my face is stuck to lamppost, glued to plate-glass windows.

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Around the Nation
8:57 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Week Of Hardship Strains City Of Boston

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The city of Boston has been through an extraordinary string of challenges this week. The city's famous race was bombed, killing three people, injuring scores of others. The city was locked down for nearly a full day in order to search for the killers.

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Your Health
8:00 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Sexual Assault Of Child Sparks Protests In India's Capital

Indian protesters demonstrate Saturday in New Delhi against the alleged rape of a 5-year-old girl. The incident has reignited protests against sexual violence and the police response to such crimes.
Raveendran AFP/Getty Images

A 5-year-old girl was in serious condition Saturday after being raped and tortured by a man who held her in a locked room in India's capital for two days, officials said.

The girl went missing Monday and was found Wednesday by neighbors who heard her crying in a room in the same New Delhi building where she lives with her parents, said Delhi police official Deepak Mishra. The girl was found alone locked in a room and left for dead, he said.

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Simon Says
6:08 am
Sat April 20, 2013

A 'Tough, Smart, Proud Town' Meets Terror With Determination

Boston residents celebrated Friday night after law enforcement officers captured one of the two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 8:57 am

People in Boston can speak for themselves. And do. Loudly, bluntly and often with humor that bites.

It's a city that speaks with both its own broad, homebrew, local accent — although no one really pahks thea cah in Havahd Yahd — and dialects from around the world. It is home to some of America's oldest founding families, and fathers, mothers and children who have just arrived from Jamaica, Ireland, Bangladesh and Ghana.

There are people in Boston who dress in pinstripes and tweeds, and tattoos and spiked hair. Sometimes, they are even the same person.

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The Two-Way
5:46 am
Sat April 20, 2013

A Thank You To Al Neuharth, Founder Of 'USA Today'

Al Neuharth, founder of USA Today and former CEO of Gannett Co.
Roger L. Wollenberg UPI/Reuters

Al Neuharth died Friday at his home in Cocoa Beach, Fla.

He was 89.

Al's name may not be familiar to you, but this blogger hopes that you are acquainted with the newspaper he willed to life in 1982: USA Today.

From 1984 to 2009, I was either a reporter or editor — and sometimes both — at McPaper (a nickname that critics bestowed upon USA Today, but which those of us who were there in its best days adopted with the pride of underdogs).

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National Security
5:38 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Boston: A Real-World Test Of Homeland Security

An armored vehicle is driven near Mount Auburn and Melendy streets in Watertown.
Essdras M Suarez Boston Globe via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 12:57 pm

The Boston Marathon's medical tent last Monday was filled with exhausted and dehydrated runners, but the atmosphere had started to turn festive as the race wound down.

Then the bombs went off.

"The first patients you see are a double amputee and this woman they were doing compressions on," says Emi Larsen, a nurse who volunteered at the tent. "It was sheer panic."

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Music Interviews
4:51 am
Sat April 20, 2013

An American In Mali, Teaching The Country's Sounds

Sara Nimaga plays the balafon in Paul Chandler's music class at the American International School in Bamako, Mali.
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton NPR

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 3:33 am

Numbers are down at the American International School in Bamako, the capital of Mali.

In just over a year, the country has witnessed a rebellion, a military coup and the occupation by Islamist fighters of the desert northern region, recently largely liberated in a counteroffensive by French-led forces. Despite the troubles, the school is open and classes continue.

Teacher Paul Chandler is taking his combined class of 6th- and 7th-graders through their early paces, learning the Malian music they'll be performing at the annual school concert.

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The Two-Way
3:18 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Strong Quake In China Kills Dozens, Injures Thousands

A rescuer carries a child to safety after she was pulled out of her collapsed home after an earthquake hit Ya'an City in southwest China's Sichuan province on Saturday.
AFP/Getty Images

"A powerful earthquake jolted China's Sichuan province Saturday near where a devastating quake struck five years ago," The Associated Press writes. According to CNN, early estimates put the death toll around 100. More than 1,000 other people were reportedly injured. Both figures could change substantially as more information comes in.

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Around the Nation
2:41 am
Sat April 20, 2013

In Boston, The Search For Answers Begins

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 8:57 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

People who knew Dzhokhar Tsarnaev just have a hard time squaring the man they knew, with the violence in Boston. Sierra Schwartz went to Cambridge Rindge and Latin high school with the suspect, who's now in custody.

SIERRA SCHWARTZ: The Dzhokhar that I knew at the time was friendly, quiet but not in a - alarming way. He was just - you know, soft-spoken but very - you know, funny, very sweet, wouldn't harm a fly; someone that you would want to talk to.

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Around the Nation
2:41 am
Sat April 20, 2013

In Boston, The Search For Answers Begins

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 8:57 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And following the capture, President Obama spoke at the White House. He praised the people of Boston, and thanked law-enforcement agencies for their work. And then he posed key questions that need, now, to be answered.

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Around the Nation
2:41 am
Sat April 20, 2013

MIT Officer Died Protecting His Community, In Job He Loved

MIT campus police officer Sean Collier, 26, was shot and killed during an altercation with the two Boston Marathon bombing suspects Thursday night.
MIT Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 12:30 pm

The grisly week that began at the Boston Marathon Monday left one police officer dead.

As police closed in on the bombing suspects Thursday night, law enforcement officials say two officers were shot. One, transit police officer Richard Donohue, is in critical condition at Mount Auburn Hospital.

The other, Sean Collier of the MIT campus police, was pronounced dead Thursday night.

MIT says Collier had gone to respond to a report of an altercation on campus Thursday evening. Soon, word came over the police radio that he had been shot.

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Around the Nation
2:41 am
Sat April 20, 2013

Muslims Fear Backlash After Suspects Faith Revealed

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 8:57 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Soon after federal authorities disclosed that the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings were Muslims of Chechen descent, many American Muslims began bracing for a backlash. NPR's Jennifer Ludden has more.

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