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The Two-Way
4:08 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Prayers, Oaths Of Secrecy As Catholic Cardinals Meet

Some of the cardinals as they arrived for today's meeting in Vatican City.
Claudio Peri EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 6:35 am

As they begin the process that will lead to selection of the next pope, the Roman Catholic Church's cardinals must first decide just when to officially start deciding, NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reminds us from Rome this morning.

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The Two-Way
3:31 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Heartbreak In NYC: Parents Die In Crash; Baby Is Delivered But Later Dies

Mourners lined the street Sunday outside a synagogue in Brooklyn where funeral services were held for Raizy and Nathan Glauber.
Verena Dobnik AP

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 6:04 am

A young couple head to a hospital because the wife, who is about seven months pregnant, isn't feeling well. Then, tragedy strikes.

It's a heartbreaking story that is making headlines in New York City.

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Religion
2:53 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Cardinals At Odds Over When To Begin Choosing Next Pope

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:02 am

The College of Cardinals is holding its first official meetings at the Vatican on Monday. The top agenda item is choosing which day to start the closed-door conclave that will elect the new pope. With no clear front-runner, the conclave outcome is unpredictable.

The papal resignation has put the cardinals in an unprecedented situation in modern history.

"The real mood is of shock and disappointment — this resignation desacralized the figure of the pope," says Massimo Franco, author of several books about the Vatican. He says a pope cannot be treated like a company CEO.

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The Two-Way
2:40 am
Mon March 4, 2013

At Florida Sinkhole, Demolition Continues

In Seffner, Fla., on Sunday, demolition crews and firefighters watched as a crane operator worked to bring down the home where a man was sucked into a sinkhole last week.
Scott Audette Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:54 am

The grim work continues at a home near Tampa, Fla., where a man apparently died last week when a sinkhole opened up under his bedroom.

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Around the Nation
2:09 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Lock-Picking Class Is Popular In Oakland

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Burglary is a big problem in Oakland, California. So Mayor Jean Quan opened the door to some harsh criticism when her weekly newsletter of community events advertised a lock-picking class. Learn the art for only $40. Some residents were unhinged, but organizers say the course is for hobbyists, not criminals. The mayor apologized, but the advertising seems to have worked - the class was sold out. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
1:59 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Book News: 'New Yorker' Plagiarist's Book Pulled From Shelves

Jonah Lehrer attends a panel discussion in conjunction with the World Science Festival in 2008.
Thos Robinson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:17 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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It's All Politics
1:02 am
Mon March 4, 2013

President Obama To Nominate New EPA, Budget And Energy Heads

President Obama is expected to nominate Gina McCarthy, currently assistant administrator with the Environmental Protection Agency, to head the agency on Monday. The nomination requires a Senate confirmation.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:02 am

President Obama plans to announce three Cabinet-level nominations Monday, including a new administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency, who could be on the hot seat in the looming battle over global warming.

Gina McCarthy, currently an assistant administrator in the wing of the EPA that regulates air pollution, is the president's pick to head the EPA.

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Around the Nation
1:02 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Mom Saves Baby From Deadly Drop Out Of Window

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

A woman in Spokane, Washington stepped out of the shower and into a moment of terror. Her 14-month-old boy was bouncing on the bed. He bounced out a half-open second-story window. She dove after the boy, smashed through the window, grabbed his foot as he was tumbling down the porch roof and lowered the kid safely to his grandma, who was smoking on the porch.

The mom then crashed into a bush. She's scraped up. The baby is fine.

Around the Nation
12:18 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Hard-Hit Boise Subdivision Lacks Owner-Occupied Homes

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The housing market is recovering in much of the country, not so much in Idaho. Home prices dropped by 46 percent in the Boise area during the financial crises. Forty-six percent. Today's business bottom line takes us to the home of a family that rode out the crash and are still waiting for better times. Here's Molly Messick of Boise State Public Radio.

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Analysis
12:01 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Politics In The News

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

President Obama spent part of the weekend reaching out to members of Congress. He's still looking for some alternative to the budget cuts that he ordered on Friday. A federal law required the automatic spending cuts and they went into effect, despite widespread agreement that the manner of the cuts was not very bright.

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Business
12:01 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Winery To Experiment With 'Drunken Treasure'

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: drunken treasure.

Some wine connoisseurs say that wine recovered from shipwrecks has a unique taste. Could be sheer age but it might be something else about the aging process at the bottom of the ocean.

JIM DYKE: The ocean providing a sort of constant motion to the wine as it sits on the bottom, pressure is different, lack of light, temperature.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Africa
12:01 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Ethnic Violence Haunts Kenya's Presidential Election

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Kenya votes for a new president today for the first time in five years. It's an important election, in part because the country is still haunted by the ethnic violence that bloodied the last presidential election in 2007. More than 1,200 people were killed and the violence only ended after the international community stepped in. NPR's Gregory Warner is out visiting polling stations and talking to people in Nairobi. He joins us to talk about the election. Good morning, Greg.

GREGORY WARNER, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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Middle East
10:27 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

Palestinians Still Feel The Squeeze Of The Restrictions On Gaza

A Palestinian laborer works at the site of a residential construction project funded by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip, on Mar. 21, 2012.
Said Khatib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 3:43 am

The streets of Gaza are busy, but they are also crumbling.

Since Hamas took control of the Gaza Strip in 2007, Israel has maintained tight limits on shipments of anything that could be used for military purposes. That includes basic building materials that could be used for bunkers and rocket launching sites.

Ask businessman Ali Abdel Aal what's the toughest thing for him to find, and he'll tell you "cement and gravel."

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The Salt
10:25 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

Selling Kids On Veggies When Rules Like 'Clean Your Plate' Fail

Good advice, but strict rules at mealtime may backfire.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 12:14 pm

If you're a parent, you've probably heard remarks like this during dinner: "I don't like milk! My toast is burnt! I hate vegetables! I took a bite already! What's for dessert?" It can be daunting trying to ensure a healthy diet for our children. So it's no wonder parents often resort to dinner time rules.

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Shots - Health News
10:24 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

Your Child's Fat, Mine's Fine: Rose-Colored Glasses And The Obesity Epidemic

Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 3:30 pm

About 69 percent of American adults are overweight or obese, and more than four in five people say they are worried about obesity as a public health problem.

But a recent poll conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health revealed a curious schism in our national attitudes toward obesity: Only one in five kids had a parent who feared the boy or girl would grow up to be overweight as an adult.

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The Record
10:23 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

How One Band Turned A Ghost Town Into A Giant Recording Studio

Part of the abandoned mining apparatus in the town of Piramida.
Courtesy of Efterklang

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:02 am

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All Tech Considered
10:22 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

'Consumer Reports' Offers Tips For Doing Taxes Online

While many people look to tax preparation services for help, Tobie Stanger, editor at Consumer Reports, says online tools are often cost-effective.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:02 am

Tax day is looming and taxpayers are scrambling to gather receipts, W-2 forms and other documents. For many, gone are the days of paper ledger books and calculators, now that there's software to figure out how much they owe.

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Environment
7:52 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

After Keystone Review, Environmentalists Vow To Continue Fight

Demonstrators carry a mock pipeline as they pass the White House to protest the Keystone Pipeline, in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 18, 2012.
Rod Lamkey Jr. The Washington Times /Landov

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 9:33 am

Environmentalists have a hope.

If they can block the Keystone XL pipeline, they can keep Canada from developing more of its dirty tar sands oil. It takes a lot of energy to get it out of the ground and turn it into gasoline, so it has a bigger greenhouse gas footprint than conventional oil.

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Shots - Health News
11:41 am
Sun March 3, 2013

Scientists Report First Cure Of HIV In A Child, Say It's A Game-Changer

HIV particles, yellow, infect an immune cell, blue.
NIAID_Flickr

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 11:35 am

Scientists believe a little girl born with HIV has been cured of the infection.

She's the first child and only the second person in the world known to have been cured since the virus touched off a global pandemic nearly 32 years ago.

Doctors aren't releasing the child's name, but we know she was born in Mississippi and is now 2 1/2 years old — and healthy. Scientists presented details of the case Sunday at a scientific conference in Atlanta.

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Education
11:35 am
Sun March 3, 2013

Teaching 2.0: Is Tech In The Classroom Worth The Cost?

Students at Westlake High School in Waldorf, Md., participate in an interactive digital conversation with historian Kenneth C. Davis about late 19th and early 20th century American history on Thursday. The school uses a state of the art "telepresence center" for students to connect with experts all over the world.
NPR Celeste Headlee

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 12:05 pm

The hallways at Westlake High School in Maryland are just like thousands of other school hallways around the country: kids milling around, laughing and chatting on their way to class.

On a recent morning, about 30 kids took their seats in a classroom that initially seems like any other. The major difference here is that instead of a chalkboard and a lectern at the head of the class, there are two enormous flat-panel screens and thin, white microphones hanging in four rows across the ceiling.

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Energy
11:35 am
Sun March 3, 2013

Turning It Down: Cities Combat Light Pollution By Going Dim

This summer Paris will start dimming its streetlights, though major landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower, will not be affected.
Mike Hewitt Getty Images

Bright lights are part of a city's ecosystem. Think of Times Square or the Las Vegas Strip or right outside your bedroom window.

Electric lighting is ubiquitous in most urban and suburban neighborhoods. It's something most people take for granted, but appreciate, since it feels like well-lit streets keep us safer. But what if all this wattage is actually causing harm?

"We're getting brighter and brighter and brighter," warns Paul Bogard, author of the upcoming book, End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:07 am
Sun March 3, 2013

At 100, Composer Margaret Bonds Remains A Great Exception

Margaret Bonds in 1956. Born in Chicago in 1913, Bonds became one of the first African-American female composers to gain recognition in the United States.
Carl Van Vechten Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 11:35 am

Margaret Bonds, who died in 1972, is perhaps near the top of the very short list of African-American female composers. Thanks to her partnerships with Langston Hughes and soprano Leontyne Price and others, she's remembered in some circles as an important figure in American composition. But, mostly, she's been forgotten.

"It's amazing that people don't know who she was, although she was quite well known in her time," says Louise Toppin, an opera singer and a voice professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Author Interviews
10:07 am
Sun March 3, 2013

Time Rules In Jamaica Kincaid's New Novel, 'See Now Then'

Jamaica Kincaid, author of numerous works of fiction and nonfiction, lives in Vermont.
Kenneth Noland Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 3:44 pm

Author Jamaica Kincaid is out with a new novel, her first in 10 years.

Kincaid is perhaps best known for her books At the Bottom of the River and The Autobiography of My Mother. Her new book, See Now Then, tackles some difficult themes.

The novel opens with a scene of a seemingly idyllic home life in small-town New England. But it is soon clear the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Sweet is anything but sweet.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
10:06 am
Sun March 3, 2013

The Movie Alex Karpovsky Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Luis Guzman and Adam Sandler in Paul Thomas Anderson's Punch Drunk Love.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 11:35 am

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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The Two-Way
9:32 am
Sun March 3, 2013

Blast Targets Shiites In Pakistan; Dozens Killed

Pakistanis check the site of a bomb blast in Karachi on Sunday. Pakistani officials say the blast has killed dozens of people in a neighborhood dominated by Shiites.
Fareed Khan AP

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 10:18 am

Dozens of people are dead in the Pakistani port city of Karachi following a blast Sunday near a Shiite mosque.

Update at 3:16 p.m. ET Toll Rises

Authorities now say at least 37 people were killed and another 141 wounded in the blast.

Our original post:

Here's more from The Associated Press:

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It's All Politics
7:53 am
Sun March 3, 2013

In First Post-Election Interview, Romney Calls Race A 'Magnificent' Experience

Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney and wife, Ann, at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on Dec. 8, 2012, in Las Vegas.
Al Bello Getty Images

It was not the outcome they had hoped for, but in his first interview since losing the presidential election, Mitt Romney said he and his wife are moving on.

Speaking to host Chris Wallace on Fox News Sunday, Romney described last year's presidential race, his second attempt at serving in the White House, as a "great, thrilling experience of a lifetime."

"It didn't end the way we wanted it to, but the experience itself was magnificent," Romney said.

Both he and his wife, Ann, said they did not expect to lose to President Obama last November.

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The Two-Way
7:33 am
Sun March 3, 2013

Britain's Queen Hospitalized With Apparent Stomach Ailment

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II has been taken Sunday to a hospital in central London. She's being treated for symptoms of gastroenteritis.
Matt Dunham AP

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II is in hospital where she's being treated for symptoms of gastroenteritis.

NPR's Philip Reeves is reporting on the story for out Newscast unit. Here's what he says:

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Middle East
5:39 am
Sun March 3, 2013

Miles From Home, Syrians Vote In Free Elections

As Aleppo residents in the Tariq al-Bab district recover from this week's attack by Syrian regime forces, delegates from the city are in Turkey holding an election for local officials.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 6:24 am

In Syria's northern province of Aleppo, the war is far from over. Yet civilians are planning a dramatic gesture: an election for a civilian government.

This weekend, delegates from across the province are taking part in the first free vote outside of the control of President Bashar Assad's regime. Its location: Gaziantep, Turkey.

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The Two-Way
2:48 am
Sun March 3, 2013

Only Syrians Can Tell President When To Go, Assad Says

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 4:38 am

Syrian President Bashar Assad, in apparent response to Secretary of State John Kerry's remarks last week in support of opposition forces in Syria, says only the Syrian people can tell him to step down.

"Only Syrian people can tell the president stay or leave, come or go. No one else," he said in an interview to Britain's Sunday Times.

It was a rare TV interview for the Syrian president, whose regime has battled rebels as well as calls to step down for nearly two years.

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The Two-Way
2:33 am
Sun March 3, 2013

After Delay, SpaceX Dragon Reaches Space Station

The SpaceX Dragon cargo vehicle is grappled by the International Space Station's robotic arm Sunday morning.
NASA TV

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 2:45 am

The Dragon has been captured. The SpaceX unmanned craft connected with the International Space Station at 5:31 a.m. ET, NASA tweeted. The spacecraft arrived a day late due to mechanical problems after Friday's launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla.

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