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All Tech Considered
8:46 am
Fri March 1, 2013

A Kenyan Teen's Discovery: Let There Be Lights To Save Lions

There are just 2,000 lions left in Kenya, according to estimates. Their population is dwindling in part because they are killed in retaliation for attacks on livestock. Richard Turere's invention could help save the lions.
Karel Prinsloo AP

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 6:37 pm

One of the talks from the TED stage in Long Beach, Calif., this week came from Richard Turere, an inventor. He is a Maasai from Kenya. And he's 13.

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It's All Politics
8:36 am
Fri March 1, 2013

5 Dates To Watch In Budget Showdown

President Obama speaks to reporters Friday at the White House after he met with congressional leaders regarding the sequester. "Even with these cuts in place, folks all across this country will work hard to make sure that we keep the recovery going," said Obama. "But Washington sure isn't making it easy."
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 9:06 am

Friday's deadline for President Obama to issue a sequestration order is neither the beginning nor the end of this year's budget battles in Washington. Here are five key moments to watch over the next seven months, and what's at stake in each:

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The Two-Way
8:34 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Violent Street Clashes In Bangladesh Leave Dozens Dead

A truck burns on a street outside Bangladesh's capital, Dhaka, on Thursday. Violence erupted, and dozens have been killed, after a court sentenced an Islamist leader to the death penalty for crimes dating to the country's 1971 war of independence.
AFP/Getty Images

A wave of violence has rocked Bangladesh after a special war crimes tribunal Thursday imposed the death penalty on an Islamist leader for his role in the country's 1971 war of independence from Pakistan.

Demonstrators for and against the convicted leader clashed with security forces, leaving dozens of people dead, including police.

The violence demonstrates the deep sensitivities that remain over the war of independence that played out more than 40 years ago.

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Pop Culture
8:29 am
Fri March 1, 2013

V Reasons To Love Roman Numerals

The Roman numerals for NFL Super Bowl XLVII float on the Mississippi River on Feb. 2 in New Orleans.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 4:55 pm

Pope Benedict XVI has left the Vatican.

Love the Catholic Church or not, you have to admit the Roman numerals following a pope's name are distinctive. They set the pope apart from the rest of humankind. (As if he needs it.)

Roman numerals always stand out. In an increasingly computer-driven world run by the numbers — population totals, unemployment figures, mortgage payments, health care bills, credit card codes, "the last four of your social" — the occasional brash appearance of an X or an MCM can be surprising and sometimes a little unsettling.

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The Salt
8:03 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Sugar's Role In Rise Of Diabetes Gets Clearer

A performer drinks a soda in Ahmedabad, India in 2010. A study found that rising diabetes prevalence in countries like India is strongly tied to sugar consumption.
Sam Panthaky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 7:12 am

Robert Lustig wants to convince the world that sugar is making us very sick. And lately he's turned to an unconventional field – econometrics – to do it.

Lustig rounded up statisticians and epidemiologists to look at the relationship between food and diabetes risk. The paper, published this week in the journal PLoS One, found that the more sugar on the market in 175 countries, the higher the country's diabetes rate.

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The Two-Way
7:46 am
Fri March 1, 2013

No Cyanide Detected In Chicago Lottery Winner's Remains

Urooj Khan, with his winning lottery ticket. Not long after this photo was taken, he was dead.
AP

The question of whodunit remains unanswered in the case of a Chicago lottery winner who died last July with a lethal amount of cyanide in his blood.

Cook County Medical Examiner Dr. Stephen Cina said Friday that tests on the remains of Urooj Khan did not detect cyanide in tissues or what remains of his digestive system.

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The Two-Way
7:46 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Michigan Governor Declares Financial Emergency In Detroit

The General Motors world headquarters building dominates the Detroit skyline.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 1:55 pm

Saying it was a "sad day," Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder declared a financial emergency in the city of Detroit. He said that while it would not be appropriate to appoint an emergency manager, now, he would think about doing so after March 12. That's the day set aside for a hearing, if the city appeals his decision.

"I do have a top candidate," Snyder said during a press conference.

The Detroit Free Press explains:

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The Two-Way
7:05 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Decrying 'Dumb, Arbitrary Cuts,' Obama Says 'We Will Get Through This'

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 9:23 am

"Washington sure isn't making it easy" for the American people and the American economy, President Obama told reporters late Friday morning as he and other lawmakers failed to reach a deal to avert $85 billion worth of automatic "sequester" spending cuts due to start at the end of the day.

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Law
7:02 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Weighing The Future Of The Voting Rights Act

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, you've heard the pundits and the politicians give their take on the new S-word - sequestration. We'll ask the Barber Shop guys for their perspective on this later in the program. But first we want to talk about another big topic in Washington this week. That is the challenge to the landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965. That's before the Supreme Court, specifically section five of the act.

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The Two-Way
6:57 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Virginia Gov. Restores Scooter Libby's Voting Rights

Former chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby in 2007.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 1:56 pm

Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell has restored the voting rights of I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby.

If you remember Libby was former Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff. As the AP explains, "he was convicted in 2007 of perjury, obstruction of justice and making false statements in a case involving leaked information that compromised the covert identity of CIA operative Valerie Plame. Libby's 2½-year prison sentence was commuted by then-President George W. Bush."

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Shots - Health News
6:56 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Health Insurers Brace For Consumer Ratings In Some States

Shopping for health insurance could get a little easier in some states this fall.
iStockphoto.com

This fall, health insurers in a few states will be seeing stars.

Not the celestial kind, but stars that reflect their scores on quality measures picked to help consumers make informed decisions when buying health coverage.

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The Two-Way
6:51 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Kim Dotcom Loses Court Battle In Megaupload Extradition Case

Kim Dotcom, founder of the file-sharing website Megaupload, says he will take his fight against extradition to the United States to New Zealand's highest court, after an appeals court ruled in the U.S. government's favor Friday.

At issue is the amount of evidence Dotcom's defense team is entitled to see at the extradition hearing. An appeals court overruled a lower court's decision that the U.S. government had to provide more than a summary of its case against the Internet entrepreneur.

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Fri March 1, 2013

SpaceX Reports Problem With Dragon Capsule

The Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket lifts off from at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Friday.
John Raoux Associated Press

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 3:24 pm

Update at 8:10 p.m. ET: Problem Fixed, Arrival Delayed

SpaceX says the problem with its unmanned craft carrying supplies for the International Space Station has been fixed.

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The Picture Show
6:31 am
Fri March 1, 2013

The Photographer Who Made Architects Famous

Portrait of Ezra Stoller with view camera, circa 1965.
Bill Maris Courtesy of Yossi Milo Gallery

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 4:31 am

Ezra Stoller probably wouldn't care about this question, but let's indulge it anyways: What makes a "beautiful" photograph?

To a degree, a lot depends on the subject, right? Would Ansel Adams have been half as famous if those landscapes hadn't already done most of the work?

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The Two-Way
5:31 am
Fri March 1, 2013

China's Broadcast Of Drug Lord's Final Hours Sparks Controversy

Originally published on Sat March 2, 2013 9:54 am

In a country where executions are so commonplace as to barely rate a mention on the evening news, the death by lethal injection of a drug lord and three accomplices in China on Friday got its own two-hour special on state television.

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The Two-Way
5:08 am
Fri March 1, 2013

As Cardinals Vet Possible Popes, Names May Emerge

Roman Catholic cardinals at the Vatican on Thursday, as Pope Benedict XVI bid them goodbye. Now they must turn to choosing his successor.
Osservatore Romano Reuters /Landov
  • On 'Morning Edition': Cokie Roberts reports from Rome

Will there be any clues in coming days and weeks about which cardinal will replace the now-departed Pope Benedict XVI?

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Shots - Health News
4:27 am
Fri March 1, 2013

A Mother's Death Tested Reporter's Thinking About End-of-Life Care

Charles Ornstein with his mother, Harriet Ornstein, on his wedding day, weeks after she was mugged in a parking lot and knocked to the pavement with a broken nose.
Randall Stewart Courtesy of Charles Ornstein

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 5:42 am

My father, sister and I sat in the near-empty Chinese restaurant, picking at our plates, unable to avoid the question that we'd gathered to discuss: When was it time to let Mom die?

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The Two-Way
4:10 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Woodward: White House Dislikes Being 'Challenged Or Crossed'

Washington Post associate editor Bob Woodward speaks at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., in June.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 6:08 am

On a day when we're in the final countdown for sequestration, Washington is still abuzz over whether or not White House economic adviser Gene Sperling threatened journalist Bob Woodward.

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The Two-Way
4:06 am
Fri March 1, 2013

'Harlem Shake' On A Plane Has FAA Investigating; See The Video

Doing the Harlem Shake aboard a Frontier Airlines flight has the FAA asking questions.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 4:32 am

Shakes on a plane aren't all that funny to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Colorado College's ultimate frisbee team last month convinced the crew aboard a Frontier Airlines fight to let them do the "Harlem Shake."

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The Two-Way
3:30 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Sinkhole Swallows Sleeping Man In Florida

An engineer surveys in front of the home where a sinkhole opened up late Thursday near Tampa, Fla. A man who had been in one of the home's bedrooms screamed for help and disappeared. It's feared he died.
Chris O'Meara AP

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 9:39 am

Update at 2:30 p.m. ET. Rescue Hopes Dim Further:

"Hopes for the rescue of a man sucked into a sinkhole were dimming Friday as authorities tried to determine whether the ground nearby was stable enough for a rescue operation," the Tampa Bay Times writes.

The Times also has a harrowing account from Jeremy Bush, who survived, of his brother Jeffrey's disappearance into the sinkhole:

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The Two-Way
2:44 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Deja Vu All Over Again As 'Sequester' Deadline Looms

The White House: When night falls, it looks like the "sequester" will arrive.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 6:55 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Ari Shapiro reports

Update at 11:55 a.m. ET. As Expected, No Deal:

President Obama and Congressional leaders met at the White House Friday morning and, just as pundits predicted, they could not reach a deal to avert the $85 billion in automatic spending cuts set to begin at the end of the day. We've posted on that news:

Decrying 'Dumb, Arbitrary Cuts,' Obama Says 'We Will Get Through This'

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The Two-Way
2:38 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Book News: Caro Wins His Third National Book Critics Circle Award

Robert Caro, who won the National Book Critics Circle Award in biography, at a gala at the Norman Mailer Center in New York.
Andy Kropa Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
2:03 am
Fri March 1, 2013

FAA Investigates 'Shakes' On A Plane

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with news of shakes on a plane.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HARLEM SHAKE")

BAAUER: (singing) The Harlem Shake.

Europe
1:29 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Delays, Problems Plague Berlin's New Airport

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

The new Berlin International Airport is scheduled to open for business October 2011. Yeah, they missed that deadline. Trouble with safety equipment caused delays, but one system is working; all the airport lights are on, every window ablaze. Work crews cannot turn the lights off. The technical director speaks as if the lights were some living being. We haven't progressed far enough with our lighting system that we can control it.

Analysis
12:41 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Vatican Is Without Sitting Pope

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 1:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. In Italy the papacy is officially vacant. The Vatican is now under the control of the cardinals who will elect a new leader of the Catholic Church. Yesterday Pope Benedict XVI gave up his ring, his cape and red papal shoes to become Pope Emeritus. Cokie Roberts was there, joins us from Rome. Hi, Cokie.

COKIE ROBERTS, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

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Politics
12:16 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Why Republicans Are Out Of Step With Young Voters

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 5:16 am

Republican Party Chairman Reince Priebus has begun a series of meetings with groups that have overwhelmingly gone Democratic in the past two presidential elections.

He's sitting down with Latino and Asian voters and with young people across the country. The youth group is of particular concern to the GOP because voting habits established at this stage could last a lifetime.

College students at Ohio State University were eager to talk about the state of the GOP brand. The class is called American Political Parties.

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Food
12:16 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Why Process Food Is Cheaper Than Healthier Options

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 1:32 am

Earlier in the week in our "On the Run" series, we heard a mom explain how mac and cheese was more affordable than fresh fruit. Morning Edition reached out to Barry Popkin of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, a nutritionist and economist, to explain why that would be true.

Movie Reviews
12:16 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Movie Review: 'Jack The Giant Slayer'

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 1:58 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The story of "Jack and the Beanstalk" has been filmed by people as diverse as Gene Kelly, Chuck Jones and the Three Stooges. Now there's "Jack the Giant Slayer."

Kenneth Turan has this review.

KENNETH TURAN: Pity poor Jack. There he was minding his own business in some dusty fairytale book when he was dragooned into active service as the front man for a would-be blockbuster. Jack's been through the Hollywood shuffle before, but there's never been a Jack tale that delivered so little pleasure for so many dollars.

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Afghanistan
10:24 pm
Thu February 28, 2013

New Afghan Challenge For U.S.: Shipping Stuff Out

A pair of mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles are lined up for a convoy to Kandahar Airfield. One of the trucks broke down before leaving Forward Operating Base Frontenac. The unit has to move out 50 vehicles from the compound.
Sean Carberry/NPR

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 3:12 am

In addition to training and equipping Afghan soldiers, U.S. forces in Afghanistan have another critical mission: packing up more than 11 years worth of equipment and sending it home. The number of containers to move out is in the six figures, and some question whether everything can be shipped out by the end of 2014.

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Planet Money
10:01 pm
Thu February 28, 2013

Sales Are Like Drugs. What Happens When A Store Wants Customers To Quit?

Formerly known as "clearance."
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 7:27 am

Last year, J.C. Penney saw what every big retailer had been seeing for years: the threat of Amazon and other new competitors rising to destroy their business.

So J.C. Penney brought in a bold new CEO. Ron Johnson had already created Apple Store, a chain of physical stores where people flocked to shop. Before that, he had revamped Target.

And Johnson had a plan for J.C. Penney: Tell customers they don't have to spend time anymore clipping coupons or waiting for sales to happen. Instead, the store would offer fair prices on its merchandise every day.

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