NPR News

Pages

NPR Story
11:38 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Our last word in business today is filial piety.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

That's the ancient Chinese ethic of young people showing care and respect to their parents and older relatives. Now it's the law in China. Starting this summer, if kids don't pay enough attention to their folks, mom and dad can sue.

Read more
NPR Story
11:38 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

What Is The Effect Of Asking Americans To Think About The Greater Good?

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When President Obama recently called for stricter gun control laws, he started out by saying this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: This is the land of the free, and it always will be.

INSKEEP: The land of the free, he said. But he added this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

OBAMA: We don't live in isolation. We live in a society, a government of and by and for the people. We are responsible for each other.

Read more
Around the Nation
10:18 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Historian Propels Connecticut To Claim 'First In Flight'

Gustave Whitehead and the No. 21. Connecticut claims that Whitehead's half-mile flight in 1901 was the first flight, not the well-known Wright brothers' flight that occurred two years later.
Courtesy Deutsches Flugpioniermuseum Gustav Weisskopf Leutershausen/Historical Flight Research Committee Gustave Whitehead

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 3:35 pm

The ongoing battle between historians over who was really first in flight was rekindled last week.

New research advances the theory that a German immigrant in Connecticut is responsible for the first powered and controlled flight, rather than the Wright brothers in North Carolina.

But historians at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum are saying not so fast.

Finding The Evidence

Read more
Shots - Health News
10:16 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Bioethics Panel Warns Against Anthrax Vaccine Testing On Kids

The anthrax vaccine has been given to more than 1 million adults in the military. But no one knows how well it would work in children.
Randy Davey Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:42 am

A controversial government proposal to test the anthrax vaccine in children would be unethical without first conducting much more research, a presidential commission concluded Tuesday.

"The federal government would have to take multiple steps before anthrax vaccine trials with children could be ethically considered," Amy Gutmann, who chairs the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, tells Shots. "It would not be ethical to do it today."

Read more
Shots - Health News
10:15 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Alzheimer's 'Epidemic' Now A Deadlier Threat To Elderly

Social worker Nuria Casulleres shows a portrait of Audrey Hepburn to elderly men during a memory activity at the Cuidem La Memoria elderly home in Barcelona, Spain, last August. The home specializes in Alzheimer's patients.
David Ramos Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 2:44 am

Alzheimer's disease doesn't just steal memories. It takes lives.

The disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., and figures released Tuesday by the Alzheimer's Association show that deaths from the disease increased by 68 percent between 2000 and 2010.

Read more
All Tech Considered
2:14 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

CEO Of Electronic Arts, World's Third-Largest Gaming Company, Resigns

Electronic Arts CEO John Riccitiello, seen here speaking at the E3 Expo in 2010, is stepping down, the company announced Monday.
Michal Czerwonka Getty Images

Electronic Arts, the world's third-largest video game company, announced Monday that CEO John Riccitiello would be stepping down.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Argentine President Asks Pope Francis To Mediate Falklands Dispute

Pope Francis meets Argentinian President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner on Monday in Vatican City.
L'Osservatore Romano Getty Images

In their first meeting since Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio became Pope Francis, Argentina's President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner asked the pontiff to "mediate" in the dispute over the Falkland Islands.

"This is an important moment for us," Kirchner said, during a press conference following the lunch meeting. "I asked him for his mediation to try to find a dialogue on the question of the Falkland Islands."

Read more
All Tech Considered
12:45 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Maker Of 3-D Printer Guns Now Has Federal Firearms License

This AR-15 rifle's lower receiver (in soft green color) was produced with a 3-D printer. The 3-D printing industry has criticized the use of the technology for gun part making.
Courtesy of Defense Distributed Dev Blog

Read more
The Two-Way
12:34 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Bloomberg Wants Retailers To Keep Tobacco Products Out Of Sight

Harry Patel, an employee of Blondie's Deli and Grocery, talks on the phone while waiting for customers in New York on Monday. A new anti-smoking proposal would make New York the first city in the nation to keep tobacco products out of sight in retail stores.
Mark Lennihan AP

First supersized soda, now cigarettes: Under New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's new plan, retailers in the city would have to keep tobacco products out of sight. The goal, he says, is to curb the rate of youth smoking.

The measure would make New York the first city in the nation to keep tobacco products out of sight in stores.

Read more
All Tech Considered
12:24 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Can 'Smart Gun' Technology Help Prevent Violence?

This 9 mm semi-automatic handgun is configured with transducers in its handle that can detect the grasp of an authorized user.
New Jersey Institute of Technology AP

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 12:54 pm

For years, many have dreamed of so-called smart guns, weapons that know their rightful owner and won't fire in the wrong hands. Think James Bond's gun in Skyfall.

A few major gun makers experimented with smart guns in the 1990s, but none came to market. Since then, it's been the domain of entrepreneurs and inventors.

Developers And Technologists

Read more
U.S.
12:13 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Among Thousands Of Gun Deaths, Only One Charles Foster Jr.

Led by the Rev. Willie Phillips (center), protesters march in February against violence in and around Club Majestic.
Mike Haskey Courtesy of The Ledger Enquirer

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 4:45 pm

The Morris Missionary Baptist Church is nestled down a red dirt road, in Morris, Ga., set among pine trees near the Alabama state line. Next to the small white church lies its most recent grave site: that of Charles Foster Jr.

While the mass killings in Newtown, Conn., and Aurora, Colo., garnered a frenzy of news coverage, statistically, they are not the norm. Each year, thousands of gun homicides in the U.S. — 11,000 in 2010 alone — attract little or no media attention.

Read more
Author Interviews
12:13 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

'FDR And The Jews' Puts A President's Compromises In Context

President Franklin D. Roosevelt meets with the National Jewish Welfare Board — (left to right) Walter Rothschild, Chaplain Aryeh Lev, Barnett Brickner and Louis Kraft — at the White House on Nov. 8, 1943.
George R. Skadding AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 4:17 am

The subject of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's relationship with the Jewish community is complicated, multidimensional and contentious. On the one hand, the former New York governor won Jewish votes by landslide margins and led the Allies to victory in World War II, defeating Nazi Germany. Some of his closest advisers and strongest supporters were Jews, including Felix Frankfurter, whom he named to the Supreme Court, speechwriter Samuel Rosenman and Treasury Secretary Henry Morgenthau.

Read more
Law
11:43 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Supreme Court Tests Limits Of Voter Registration Law

Arizona Attorney General Thomas Horne talks with reporters outside the U.S. Supreme Court after oral arguments in the case challenging Arizona's voter registration law on Monday.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 1:57 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Monday in a case that seeks to redefine a federal law aimed at streamlining the nation's voter registration process.

Congress enacted the law 20 years ago after it found that 40 percent of eligible voters were not registered to vote. Under the 1993 National Voter Registration Act, people can register by mail to vote in federal elections using a standard federal form. The form, among other things, asks prospective voters whether they are U.S. citizens and requires them to sign to the statement, under penalty of perjury.

Read more
From Our Listeners
11:43 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Vintage Sounds: The Whirs And Clicks Of Film Cameras

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 12:54 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Last week in All Tech Considered, we invited listeners to share stories of sounds from older technology you miss. This invitation was prompted by a story about some young people who choose to shoot pictures on actual film, a kind of digital counter-revolution.

We asked you to send in samples of audio from older technology that's been overtaken by all the new devices we now use.

(SOUNDBITE OF A RECORD PLAYER NEEDLE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: A phonograph needle dropping onto a record is like a drum roll.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:40 am
Mon March 18, 2013

FBI Says It Knows Who's Behind Biggest Art Museum Heist In History

Rembrandt, A Lady and Gentleman in Black, 1633. Oil on canvas, 131.6 x 109 cm. Inscribed at the foot: Rembrandt.ft: 1633. This monumental work hung in a prominent spot in the Dutch Room, visible through its windows overlooking the court. Rembrandt completed this work in his second year in Amsterdam in 1632.
FBI

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:51 pm

The FBI says it believes it knows who perpetrated the biggest art museum heist in history.

Read more
Intelligence Squared U.S.
11:34 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Does America Need A Strong Dollar Policy?

(From left) John Taylor, Frederic Mishkin, James Grant and Steve Forbes traded arguments during the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate.
Samuel LaHoz
  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

Is a strong U.S. dollar a good thing, or is it overrated as a policy goal?

Some argue that a policy aimed at keeping the dollar strong would hurt U.S. economic growth because it would make American goods and services more expensive, lessening global demand for them. Others say having a weak and unstable unit as the basis of the economy makes commerce harder and creates financial bubbles that then burst disastrously.

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:28 am
Mon March 18, 2013

29 States Get F On Disclosure Laws For Health Care Prices

Laws on price transparency get a failing grade in most states.
iStockphoto.com

Wonder why you can't get a straight answer on how much a treatment or test will cost you? One big reason: State laws that allow hospitals and other providers of health care to keep costs hidden until they send you the bill.

A report card on price transparency released Monday gives 29 states an F and seven states a D for policies that keep patients and their families in the dark on prices. The failing grade went to those with practically no transparency requirements.

Read more
Business
11:15 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Why The Crisis In Cyprus May End Up Hurting You Too

Cypriots protest an EU bailout deal outside the parliament in Nicosia on Monday. A proposed bailout deal would slap a levy on all Cypriot bank savings.
Patrick Baz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 7:28 am

Ask Americans to point out Cyprus, and most would have to spin a globe several times before noticing the small island nation, east of Greece and south of Turkey.

But whether or not you have ever given a thought to the 1.1 million people living there under the warm Mediterranean sun, Cyprus might send a chill up your spine this week.

Read more
Shots - Health News
10:31 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Doctors: Bench Athletes At First Concussion Sign

Robert Monges, a coach for James Lick High School, checks tight end Dominic Brewster for a concussion during a football game played in Morgan Hill, Calif., in 2006.
Patrick Tehan San Jose Mercury News/MCT/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 6:34 am

Figuring out whether a child who might have a concussion should stay in the game just got easier, thanks to this one-word answer from the nation's neurologists: No.

Today the American Academy of Neurology chucked 15-year-old rules that confused pretty much everybody, from parents and coaches to kids and doctors.

Instead of talking about various symptoms and concussion grades, the neurologists now say that the best offense is defense.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:28 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Tiger Woods, Lindsay Vonn Make It Official: 'We Are Now Dating'

Lindsey Vonn and Tiger Woods.
Photos courtesy of: Tiger Woods/Lindsey Vonn

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 9:51 am

We promise, we'll get back to real news in a little bit. But first: After weeks of rumors, the sports icons Tiger Woods and Lindsey Vonn have made it official: They are dating.

"I guess it wasn't a well-kept secret but yes, I am dating Tiger Woods," Vonn, the Olympic gold medalist ski racer, tweeted.

Both Vonn and Woods, who is a 14-time major golf champion, also posted photographs of themselves on their Facebook pages.

Read more
Latin America
10:20 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Three Decades On, Ex-Guatemalan Leader Faces Genocide Charges

Guatemala's former dictator Efrain Rios Montt arrives in court Jan. 31 in Guatemala City to stand trial on genocide charges. On Tuesday, the prosecution will present its case in the trial.
Moises Castillo AP

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 4:44 pm

In a Guatemalan courtroom Tuesday, prosecutors will present their case against a former military dictator who ruled during one of the bloodiest periods in the Central American nation's 36-year civil war.

Efrain Rios Montt is accused of genocide in the murder of tens of thousands of Guatemala's Indians. Human rights advocates and the families of victims have struggled for years to bring him before the court, and they say it is the first trial in Latin America of a former president in the country where he ruled.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:22 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Indonesian Zoo Breeds Rare Komodo Dragons

Four of seven baby Komodos born at the Surabaya Zoo in Indonesia last week.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 9:26 am

A zoo in Indonesia is now home to seven bouncing baby Komodo dragons. Before you recoil in disgust, have a look at this video from the BBC — "cute" may not be the operative word, but the hatchlings do exude a certain endearing quality.

Read more
It's All Politics
8:53 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Republicans' Secret To Success? Sound And Act More Like Democrats

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Monday.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 2:17 pm

Updated at 3:40 p.m. ET

If Republicans hope to recapture the White House in the foreseeable future, they basically need to sound and campaign more like Democrats.

Read more
The Salt
8:47 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Synesthetes Really Can Taste The Rainbow

A select group of synesthetes can truly "taste the rainbow."
Photo illustration by Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 6:23 am

Plenty of us got our fill of green-colored food on St. Patrick's Day. (Green beer, anyone?) But for some people, associating taste with color is more than just a once-a-year experience.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:43 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Steve Davis, Oklahoma Star QB In The '70s, Killed In Crash Of Small Plane

Oklahoma quarterback Steve Davis, left, and coach Barry Switzer celebrate the team's No. 1 ranking after the Orange Bowl in 1976. Davis, 60, died Sunday in the crash of a small plane. Switzer called Davis a "great role model for young people."
AP

One of the two men killed Sunday when a small plane crashed into a house near South Bend, Ind., was former University of Oklahoma star quarterback Steve Davis, the St. Joseph County (Ind.) coroner's office says.

Read more
Shots - Health News
8:29 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Worried Parents Balk At HPV Vaccine For Daughters

Lauren Fant winces as she receives her third and final shot of HPV vaccine from nurse Stephanie Pearson in Marietta, Ga., in 2007.
John Amis AP

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:35 am

More parents are worried about getting their daughters vaccinated against cervical cancer, despite more doctors saying the shots are a good idea.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:23 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Supreme Court Lets $222,000 Verdict In File-Sharing Case Stand

Jammie Thomas-Rasset of Brainerd, Minn., in 2007.
Julia Cheng AP

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 10:01 am

The first person to challenge a file-sharing lawsuit brought by the Recording Industry Association of America has reached the end of the line.

Without comment, the Supreme Court refused to hear Jammie Thomas-Rasset's appeal, which means the $222,000 verdict against her stands.

Thomas-Rasset was convicted of sharing 24 songs on the peer-to-peer service Kazaa. She was arguing that the amount in question was excessive.

Read more
The Picture Show
7:52 am
Mon March 18, 2013

10 Years Ago, A Night Vision Of The Iraq Invasion

A soldier with the U.S. Army's 3rd Infantry Division on March 20, 2003, among the first troops to set foot in Iraq in that year's invasion.
David P. Gilkey Detroit Free Press/MCT

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 8:14 am

Ten years ago this week, U.S. troops invaded Iraq. NPR's David Gilkey was there and shares his memory of a photograph he made that first night.

The photos that David Gilkey took the night of the Iraq invasion were among the first pictures of U.S. troops in combat to come out of Iraq. And among the images he captured was one of a soldier running through an abandoned Iraqi army post that had, just minutes before, been hit by U.S. rocket fire.

Those photos would not have been possible without a night vision optic for his camera.

Read more
Politics
7:38 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Justice Department's Tom Perez Tapped For Labor Secretary

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a new labor secretary.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: President Obama has chosen justice department lawyer Thomas Perez for the post. Perez is the son of immigrants from the Dominican Republic. He ran the labor department in his home state of Maryland and he will add a high profile Latino voice to the cabinet. But, NPR's Carrie Johnson reports, his nomination is not without controversy.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:36 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Syrian Opposition Poised To Vote On Interim Government

Demonstrators wave Syrian opposition flags during a protest in Istanbul against the government of Syria's President Bashar Assad, on March 15.
Osman Orsal Reuters /Landov

As Syria's revolt enters a third year, Syria's political opposition is meeting in Istanbul this week to choose a rebel government, despite opposition from the Obama administration.

Twelve candidates are in the running to lead the efforts, including an economist, a former agriculture minister and an IT specialist who is overseeing the Syrian National Coalition's aid operation on the Turkish border.

Read more

Pages