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The Two-Way
7:10 am
Tue March 5, 2013

U.S. Speedskating Investigating Sexual Abuse Allegations

Speedskater Bridie Farrell competing last Friday in Kearns, Utah. Now 31, she says she was 15 when a much older teammate began sexually abusing her.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 10:17 am

Yet another scandal has hit U.S. Speedskating (USS), which governs the sport with the biggest haul of winter Olympic medals for Team USA.

The USS board announced Monday night that it is investigating allegations of sexual abuse involving short track silver medalist Andy Gabel, now 48, who also once served as president of USS.

"U.S. Speedskating will not tolerate abuse of any kind and we intend to investigate these claims, and any others that arise, thoroughly," the group said in a written statement.

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The Two-Way
6:39 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Interactive: Compare Your Commute To The Nation's Longest

The average travel time to work in the United States tops 25 minutes, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Move around the map or enter your town or zip code to find commute times for your area.
WNYC

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 8:36 am

Are you a "mega-commuter"?

That's a term used by the U.S. Census Bureau to describe people who commute at least 90 minutes and 50 miles to work. Nearly 600,000 Americans spend that much time in vehicles, carpool lanes, and trains and buses each day, according to the bureau.

This interactive map, created by WNYC, shows commute times, by ZIP code, across the country. Zoom into your area to see how your commute compares:

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Governing
6:39 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Can Michigan Right The Ship For Detroit?

If Michigan Governor Rick Snyder has his way, Detroit will become the sixth and largest city there to come under state control. But steering a city out of crisis can be a tricky task. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jerome Vaughn, of WDET, and Robert Bobb, a former emergency financial manager for Detroit Public Schools, about the situation.

Shots - Health News
6:09 am
Tue March 5, 2013

A Costly Catch-22 In States Forgoing Medicaid Expansion

Outside the office of Utah Gov. Herbert Friday, Betsy Ogden lays paper chains on a pile symbolizing uninsured state residents who would be covered by a Medicaid expansion.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 7:08 am

Poor adults who live in states that don't go along with the federal health overhaul's expansion of Medicaid face a double whammy.

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The Salt
6:05 am
Tue March 5, 2013

From Crock-Pots to 'Cook-Overs': Your Dinnertime Confessional Tips

Meals On The Run
Dinnertime Confessional Tumblr

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 10:14 am

We touched a nerve recently when we asked about dinnertime as part of On the Run, our series exploring how crucial everyday decisions are made about food and exercise.

"No matter how close a relationship I develop with the Crock-Pot," wrote mom Celeste Higgins, it's still hard to get dinner on the table before 8 p.m.

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The Two-Way
5:39 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Pilot Reports Seeing Drone In Sky Near JFK

A jet taking off from JFK Airport in New York City last month. On Monday, a pilot reported seeing a drone in the air near the airport.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

The pilot of an Alitalia pilot flying into New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport told controllers Monday afternoon that he had spotted "a drone aircraft" 1,500 feet high in the sky and approximately 5 miles west of the airport.

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The Two-Way
5:21 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Justin Bieber Apologizes For Delay In Start Of London Concert

Justin Bieber performs live at 02 Arena on Monday.
Jim Dyson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 5:42 am

Screaming, crying fans are par for the course if you're teen idol Justin Bieber. But this is a bit different.

After a Monday concert at London's O2 Arena that reportedly started two hours late, the 19-year-old pop star has been forced to apologize for upsetting disappointed young concertgoers and their angry parents.

In a series of tweets Tuesday, Bieber issued his mea culpa:

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Shots - Health News
5:08 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Often A Health Care Laggard, U.S. Shines In Cancer Treatment

The U.S. ranks first in the world at stopping brain cancers, epidemiologists reported Monday. Here neurosurgeon Dr. Roger Hudgins and his assistant, Holly Zeller of Akron, Ohio, look at an MRI scan before performing surgery to remove a brain tumor.
Mike Cardew MCT /Landov

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 2:04 am

When it comes to the state of the nation's health, the U.S. seems to get one poor grade after another. Despite spending more on health care, we've been slipping behind other high-income countries for life expectancy and healthy living.

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The Two-Way
5:01 am
Tue March 5, 2013

14,253.77: Dow Rallies, Finishing In Record Territory

A trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange earlier this week.
Brendan McDermid Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 12:36 pm

Update at 4:09 p.m. ET. A New Record:

The Dow Industrials finished in record territory today. Gaining 89 points, it closed at 14,253.77, its highest level since Oct. 9,2007.

That is, the Dow has recovered all the losses it suffered during the Great Recession.

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The Two-Way
4:34 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Man Linked To Hit-And-Run Deaths Of Parents And Baby Has Long Rap Sheet

Julio Acevedo, the suspect in a car crash that killed a couple and later the baby that the pregnant mother was carrying, in an undated New York Police Department photo.
Reuters /Landov

The man who authorities want to question about Sunday's hit-and-run car crash in Brooklyn that killed a young couple and the baby that the 21-year-old pregnant mother was carrying has "a history of violence and a prior drunken driving arrest," The Associated Press writes.

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The Two-Way
3:52 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Venezuela's Chavez Takes Turn For The Worse

A "proof of life" photo shows Chavez with his daughters, released Feb. 15 by Miraflores Presidential Press Office.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 4:10 am

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, who has been battling cancer for months, is in a "very delicate" condition, with breathing difficulties and a severe respiratory infection, a government statement says.

The statement, read out Monday by Minister of Communications Ernesto Villegas, spells out the 58-year-old socialist leader's decline since his December surgery in Cuba for an unspecified cancer in the pelvic area:

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The Two-Way
3:38 am
Tue March 5, 2013

At The Vatican, 'No Rush' To Set Conclave; And A Fake Bishop Tries To Get In

That's not a real bishop on the left: A man later identified as Ralph Napierski of Germany (at left) posed with Cardinal Sergio Sebiastiana and others on Monday at the Vatican. Napierski was an imposter. He was later escorted from the area by Swiss Guards.
Vincenzo Pinto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 6:17 am

Roman Catholic cardinals are in "no rush" to set the date for the start of their conclave that will choose the next pope, a Vatican spokesman told reporters Tuesday.

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Around the Nation
2:15 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Wash. Lawmaker Apologizes For Cyclist Comment

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. When Washington state lawmakers proposed a new tax on bikes, the owner of several bike shops protested and ended up in an email argument with a Republican lawmaker, who shot back a novel claim.

State Sen. Ed Orcutt argued that cyclists pollute just by breathing. It is true that a heavy breathing cyclist will emit more carbon dioxide than a person who's just sitting. Orcutt did reconsider, and apologized.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

World
2:05 am
Tue March 5, 2013

U.S.: Diplomats Shouldn't Drink Before Budget Meeting

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with a call for a reform at the United Nations.

Joseph M. Torsella represents the United States on the U.N. budget committee. He says it's a tough budget process, complicated by diplomats who show up drunk. Ambassador Torsella made, quote, "the modest proposal that the negotiating room should be inebriation-free." He says he wants this, even though sloshed negotiators have provided the U.S. with, quote, "strategic opportunities." It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
2:00 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Book News: Male Authors Still Get Far More Coverage, Survey Shows

Author Jennifer Weiner, who has been outspoken about gender bias in book coverage in the media, pictured in 2005.
Evan Agostini Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Business
12:18 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Best Buy To End Flexible Work Program

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 2:27 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And our last word in business is, no more working in your pajamas. Best Buy says it's ending its flexible work program, calling its corporate employees back to the office.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is getting to be a trend. The move comes after Yahoo stirred debate for ending its work-from-home program. A Best Buy spokesperson told the Minneapolis Star Tribune, the hope is that quote, "all-hands-on-deck approach will lead to collaboration."

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Business
12:18 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 2:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a ketchup jackpot.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Last month, Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway and a private equity firm announced they were buying Heinz for $29 billion. Now we're learning what the deal means for Heinz's CEO, William Johnson.

Asia
12:18 am
Tue March 5, 2013

National People's Congress Opens, Prepares For Leadership Change

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 1:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. As he prepares to step down, China's prime minister today delivered his version of a state of the union address. He got a big boost in military funding, one that outpaces expected economic growth.

NPR's Louisa Lim has been gauging the mood of China's new leaders, both inside and outside of the Great Hall of the People.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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It's All Politics
10:42 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Four Things To Know About The Next Big Budget Battle

Congress has until March 27 to pass a Continuing Resolution. If it doesn't, the government will run out of money and will likely shut down.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 3:50 am

Now that the sequester has taken effect, there's a new phrase that keeps popping up in Washington: the "continuing resolution." If Congress doesn't pass a continuing resolution by March 27, the government will run out of money and will likely shut down. Here's a list of four things you might want to know about how a continuing resolution works and how it might soften the blow of the sequester.

1. Exactly what is a "continuing resolution"?

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Author Interviews
10:40 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

'Wave' Tells A True Story Of Survival And Loss In The 2004 Tsunami

This Dec. 26, 2004, photograph shows a trail of destruction in the southern Sri Lankan town of Lunawa after tidal waves lashed more than half of Sri Lanka's coastline.
Sena Vidanagama AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 2:56 am

On Dec. 26, 2004, Sonali Deraniyagala was vacationing with her husband, her two sons and her parents in Yala, Sri Lanka. The day was just beginning when she and a friend noticed that something strange was happening in the ocean. Within a matter of minutes, the sea had wiped out life as she had known it. In a new memoir, called simply Wave, she recalls her experience with the tsunami that killed more than 200,000 people, including her own family.

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Joe's Big Idea
10:39 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Wanna Play? Computer Gamers Help Push Frontier Of Brain Research

This image represents a chunk, or "cube," of brain. Each different color represents a different neuron, and the goal of the EyeWire game is to figure out how these tangled neurons connect to each other. Players look at a slice from this cube and try to identify the boundaries of each cell. It isn't easy, and it takes practice. You can try it for yourself at eyewire.org.
EyeWire

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 10:39 am

People can get pretty addicted to computer games. By some estimates, residents of planet Earth spend 3 billion hours per week playing them. Now some scientists are hoping to make use of all that human capital and harness it for a good cause.

Right now I'm at the novice level of a game called EyeWire, trying to color in a nerve cell in a cartoon drawing of a slice of tissue. EyeWire is designed to solve a real science problem — it aims to chart the billions of nerve connections in the brain.

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Author Interviews
10:38 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Skipping Out On College And 'Hacking Your Education'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 12:18 am

The cost of college can range from $60,000 for a state university to four times as much at some private colleges. The total student debt in the U.S. now tops credit card debt. So a lot of people are asking: Is college really worth it?

There are several famous and staggeringly successful college dropouts, including Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates and Larry Ellison. You may not end up with fat wallets like them, but Dale Stephens says you can find a different education path.

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Your Money
10:35 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

For Baby Boomers, Lessons In Financial Basics

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 8:54 am

The oldest of the baby boomers came of age in the 1960s and are beginning to retire. Their younger cohorts are still putting kids through college and building careers. Baby boomers are a giant portion of the population — 78 million people, by one estimate.

They grew up in an era of rising living standards, but the Great Recession destroyed any sense of financial security — and many nest eggs. Financial planner Tim Maurer outlines a variety of issues boomers face.

Who is a baby boomer, and what defines their financial situations?

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Author Interviews
10:34 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Jeb Bush: Legal Residency, Not Citizenship, For Illegal Immigrants

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush speaks during the Republican National Convention in August in Tampa, Fla.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 3:44 am

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, the son and brother of presidents, says the United States should overhaul its laws to make immigration easier and to give illegal immigrants a way to legal residence, not citizenship.

Bush lays out his plan with co-author Clint Bolick in the new book Immigration Wars. Bush tells NPR's Steve Inskeep that they propose legalizing undocumented immigrants "after there is a recognition that if people come here illegally, they have to pay a fine or do community service [and] make sure they don't commit any serious crimes."

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The Two-Way
1:34 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Indian On Hunger Strike For 12 Years Charged With Attempted Suicide

Activist Irom Sharmila is flanked by a policeman, left, and a supporter, on Monday in New Delhi. Sharmila has been on a hunger strike for 12 years to protest an Indian law that suspends many human rights protections in areas of conflict.
Tsering Topgyal AP

Hunger strikes are often used in India as a method of protest — but try being on one for 12 years.

That's how long it's been since Irom Sharmila last ate on her own. She is protesting an Indian law that suspends human rights guarantees in conflict-ridden parts of the country. The government is force-feeding her through a tube. And on Monday, Sharmila was charged with attempted suicide.

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The Two-Way
12:35 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

'Batman' Turns Over Wanted Man To Police In England

Batman brings in a wanted man to a police department in England.
West Yorkshire Police

Batman has apparently given up Gotham for a stint in the northern English town of Bradford.

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Commentary
12:34 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Cologne: Cultural Choice Or Necessity?

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Can we keep evolving as we get older? That's a question comedian and commentator Kevin Heffernan decided to explore. And his approach to changing himself was an aromatic one.

KEVIN HEFFERNAN, BYLINE: Cologne, it's a life choice. Some say it's hereditary. If your dad did it, you will. Like what sports team you root for or circumcision. Some say it's cultural. Some say it's a necessity.

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It's All Politics
12:28 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Scientists Are The New Kings (Or At Least Secretaries) At Energy Department

Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientist Ernest Moniz is introduced by President Obama as the nominee to run the Energy Department, Monday at the White House.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:18 pm

With President Obama nominating Ernest Moniz to be the nation's next energy secretary, he continued a relatively recent trend of putting scientists atop a part of the federal bureaucracy once overseen by political types.

If confirmed by the Senate, Moniz, an MIT physicist, will follow Nobel laureate Steven Chu, a University of California physicist who served as Obama's first-term energy secretary.

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Shots - Health News
12:19 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Got A Health Care Puzzle? There Should Be An App!

The GetHealth app was a runner-up at the recent Hackovate Health Innovation Competition held in Kansas City, Mo.
Courtesy of GetHealth Limited

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 12:41 pm

Kansas City, Mo., is looking to boost its health-tech cred.

So the city that's home to Cerner Corp. and other health information firms seemed a natural to host something called the Hackovate Health Innovation Competition.

A mashup of innovation and old-school hacking (though none of the participants was bent on doing harm, we're assured), the goal of the competition was to improve the nation's health system and help people navigate the complexities of the Affordable Care Act.

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U.S.
12:17 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Steamship Anchors A Community, But Its Days May Be Numbered

The nation's last coal-burning ferry, the SS Badger, sits on Lake Michigan in the port town of Ludington, Mich. The EPA permit that has long allowed the ship to dump coal ash into the lake is now under review.
Courtesy photo for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 12:50 pm

On the shores of Lake Michigan, the tiny town of Ludington, Mich., is home port to the last coal-fired ferry in the U.S. The SS Badger has been making trips across the lake to Manitowoc, Wis., during the good-weather months since 1953. And as it runs, the 411-foot ferry discharges coal ash slurry directly into the lake.

An Environmental Protection Agency permit allows the Badger to dump four tons of ash into the lake daily. But now, the agency has put the permit under review — and that means the Badger could stop sailing.

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