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The Two-Way
6:09 am
Tue February 5, 2013

U.S. Olympic Skier Lindsey Vonn Crashes In Austrian Event

Skier Lindsay Vonn is airlifted after crashing during the women's Super-G event in Schladming, Austria, possibly injuring her knee, on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013.
Luca Bruno AP

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:36 am

The U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association says that American skier Lindsey Vonn crashed during the women's world Super-G competition in Austria today and was airlifted to a nearby hospital. Reports indicate she may have a serious knee injury.

The gold-winning Olympian was trailing the race leader by 0.12 seconds, according to the USSA, when she crashed. She was taken for medical treatment by helicopter, which the organization says is 'standard protocol'.

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The Two-Way
6:05 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Obama Calls For Small Package Of Cuts, Tax Changes To Head Off 'Sequester'

President Obama at the White House on Tuesday.
Kevin Lamarque Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 2:02 am

(We updated the top of this post at 1:30 p.m. ET.)

Looking to head off deep, automatic spending cuts set to kick in on March 1, President Obama on Tuesday afternoon said that to avoid the negative economic effects that come with "political disfunction," Congress should move quickly to pass "a smaller package of spending cuts and tax reforms" that won't hurt the economy.

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The Salt
5:48 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Why Health Officials Want You To Eat More Potassium

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 7:32 am

It's a real bummer to be told to eat less of something. Especially when it's salt, the ubiquitous ingredient that seems to make everything taste a little better.

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U.S.
5:29 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Ala. Bunker Standoff Ends With Gunman Dead, Boy Alive

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Seigel.

A week-long hostage standoff in Alabama is over. Last week in the southeastern part of the state, a man kidnapped a boy from a school bus and took him into an underground bunker. Authorities had been trying to negotiate his release ever since. Late today, it was announced that the kidnapper is dead and the five-year-old hostage is OK.

Here's the FBI's Steve Richardson giving a statement in Midland City.

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Shots - Health News
5:06 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Will Your Long-Term Care Coverage Keep Up With Changing Times?

The health services offered in 30 years may not be explicitly covered by the long-term care insurance you buy today.
Pamela Moore iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 7:39 am

If you're investing to protect yourself from something that may happen 20 or 30 years down the road, you'd like to be confident that your plan will keep pace with the times.

That's a calculation purchasers of long-term care insurance have to make. But a provision in those policies that people rely on to help ensure their coverage will meet their needs decades hence may fall short.

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The Two-Way
4:48 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Dell Seals $24.2 Billion Buyout Deal; Founder Among Buyers

Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 7:56 am

"Slumping personal computer maker Dell is selling itself for $24.4 billion to its founder and a group of investors that includes Microsoft," The Associated Press writes, in "the largest deal of its kind since the Great Recession dried up financing for risky maneuvers like this."

The wire service adds that "the complex agreement announced Tuesday will end Dell Inc.'s nearly 25-year history as a publicly traded company. Shareholders are receiving $13.65 per share for their stock. ... Founder Michael Dell will remain the company's CEO and largest shareholder."

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It's All Politics
4:03 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Lonely And Frustrated: These May Be The Worst Jobs In Politics

Democrats have dominated Rhode Island's Capitol building in Providence for decades. One state Republican says it's an "uphill battle" to sell voters and candidates on the GOP's message.
Myles Dumas iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 9:56 am

Politics is filled with thankless jobs.

It's the nature of the business that plenty of people have to work for highly demanding egomaniacs. Among elected officials, few relish having to spend big chunks of their time asking other people for money, one of the essential chores.

There are certain jobs, however, that appear from the outside to be so hopeless that you wonder why anyone agreed to take them on.

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The Two-Way
3:35 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Broader Justification Emerges Of When U.S. Can Kill Americans Who Join Al-Qaida

October 2011: Men stand on the rubble of a building destroyed by a U.S. drone strike in southeastern Yemen. Among those killed was U.S. citizen Abdulrahman al-Awlaki, the son of U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki — who himself was killed by a drone strike the month before.
Khaled Abdullah Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 7:57 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Carrie Johnson talks with Steve Inskeep

American citizens who become leaders in al-Qaida or other terrorist organizations overseas and pose "an imminent threat" to Americans may be killed with drone strikes even when there's no evidence that they have specific plans to attack Americans or U.S. interests, according to a Justice Department memo that surfaced Monday.

NPR's Carrie Johnson tells our Newscast Desk that:

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Around the Nation
2:53 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Tuba Players Take Valentine's Day Requests

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montage. As one considers the many ways of wooing a beloved on Valentine's Day, the ungainly tuba and its deep bass sound are not the most obviously romantic. Still, a dozen tuba players at the University of Memphis in cute red vests and bow ties are offering a tuba serenade that will at least bring smiles. Their fee includes chocolates, a card, and two classic tunes like "My Girl" and "My Guy."

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

(humming)

Asia
2:43 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Osama Bin Laden's Hideout City Plans Makeover

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Abbottabad, Pakistan became world famous in 2011. Osama bin Laden was killed at his hiding place there. Now, the city plans an image makeover. It plans a family-friendly amusement park. The Hazara Heritage Park and Amusement City will include restaurants, mini golf, a butterfly zoo and a lake. A lawmaker tells the Guardian newspapers the park should reassure the world the city is not full of militants and is safe.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
2:41 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Dramatic End To Alabama Hostage Standoff Took Careful Planning

Law enforcement officials, including some from the FBI, near the scene of the hostage situation in Midland City, Ala., on Friday.
Philip Sears Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 4:29 pm

  • From the NPR Newscast: Dan Carsen reports

(We updated the top of this post with new material at 9:50 a.m. ET.)

As more becomes known about how authorities on Monday rescued an almost-6-year-old boy named Ethan from his nearly week-long captivity in an Alabama bunker with a gunman, some fascinating details are emerging.

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The Two-Way
2:40 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Book News: Mary Ingalls May Not Have Gone Blind From Scarlet Fever

Mary Ingalls, the sister of Laura Ingalls Wilder, went blind from illness at age 14.
Wikimedia

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 9:30 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Politics
1:26 am
Tue February 5, 2013

In Minn., Obama Appeals For Movement On Gun Background Checks

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, on the same as that funeral, President Obama continued his push for tougher gun laws. He was talking yesterday in Minneapolis on a subject he is expected to address in next week's State of the Union speech.

NPR's David Welna reports.

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NPR Story
1:10 am
Tue February 5, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And our last word in business is: America's pizza crisis solved.

For decades, Pizza Hut has been researching ways to improve the flawed pizza consumption process. Until recent years, Americans were forced to hold the slice two-handed, you know, with the finger up under the point, or fold it in half like Spike Lee in "Do the Right Thing." Pizza Hut has never felt that was good enough, and they're trying for something better.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
1:10 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Texas Court Of Inquiry To Decide If Prosecutor Lied

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In Texas, a court of inquiry has been convened to consider prosecuting a Texas judge. He's Ken Anderson. He used to be the district attorney in Williamson County, Texas, and he could face criminal charges for concealing exculpatory evidence. That's evidence that could clear a defendant of guilt. The inquiry concerns his conduct during what has become an infamous case - the prosecution and conviction of Michael Morton. Morton was wrongfully convicted and sentenced to life in prison for murdering his wife. NPR's Wade Goodwin reports.

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NPR Story
1:10 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a slip for BP.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The British oil company, BP, announced its 4th quarter earnings today, and its net profit was about a billion dollars lower than a year earlier. BP has been shrinking as assets have been sold off to pay for its liabilities tied to the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

Middle East
10:25 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

In Syrian Conflict, Real-Time Evidence Of Violations

Syrians look for survivors amid the rubble of a building targeted by a missile in the al-Mashhad neighborhood of Aleppo on Jan. 7.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:47 am

There are growing calls for Syria's leaders to face war crimes charges for the fierce assaults against rebel targets and civilian areas. If that happens, veterans of past war crimes prosecutions say, Syrians will have one big advantage: The widespread gathering of evidence across the country is happening often in real time.

After visiting a Syrian refugee camp in southeastern Turkey recently, Robert Ford, the U.S. ambassador to Syria, reacted sharply to a question that suggested Washington, D.C., has kept quiet about the Syrian regime's attacks.

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Health
10:24 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

FMLA Not Really Working For Many Employees

Jeannine Sato holds her 2-year-old son, Keni; 5-year-old Hana is held by her father, Mas Sato. Jeannine decided to leave her job when her employers said she could take six weeks off after giving birth to her first child or risk losing her job.
Courtesy of Jeannine Sato

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:47 am

Twenty years after President Bill Clinton signed the Family and Medical Leave Act, workers' rights groups say many employees still must choose between their family or their job.

They're marking the anniversary with calls to expand the law, and for Congress to pass a new one that would provide paid leave.

What Falls Under The FMLA?

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U.S.
10:22 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

One-Way Tickets To Florida: Puerto Ricans Escape Island Woes

Miguel Fontanez Sr., the owner and founder of Pioco's Chicken in Kissimmee, Fla., serves customers at his restaurant. He opened the restaurant 11 years ago, and it has become a hub for the area's large Puerto Rican community.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 1:09 pm

Puerto Rico's population is dropping. Faced with a deteriorating economy, increased poverty and a swelling crime rate, many citizens are fleeing the island for the U.S. mainland. In a four-part series, Morning Edition explores this phenomenon, and how Puerto Rico's troubles are affecting its people and other Americans in unexpected ways.

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Books News & Features
10:20 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Woody Guthrie's 'House Of Earth' Calls 'This Land' Home

The cover of House of Earth is an oil painting that Guthrie made in 1936 called In El Rancho Grande.
Courtesy HarperCollins

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:51 am

Woody Guthrie wrote thousands of songs in his lifetime — but as far as anyone knows, he only wrote one novel. Recently discovered, House of Earth is the story of a young couple living in the Texas Panhandle in the 1930s. They dream of building a house that will withstand the bitter winds and ever-present dust that constantly threaten the flimsy wooden shack they call home.

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Around the Nation
10:07 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Gun Violence Robs Chicago Mother Of 4th Child

Shirley Chambers cries during Monday's funeral for her son Ronnie Chambers, 33. She had four children, three boys and a girl, all victims of gun violence in Chicago over a period of 18 years.
John Gress Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 10:40 am

The gun violence that scars some Chicago neighborhoods has been a plague for one woman. Shirley Chambers first lost a child to gunfire in the mid 1990s. In 2000, a daughter and a son were shot to death just months apart. On Monday, Chambers buried her last child.

Nearly 500 people filled the pews, the choir lofts and hallways of St. Luke Church of God in Christ for the funeral of 33-year-old Ronnie Chambers, an aspiring music producer who died Jan. 26.

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World
2:58 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

In Moscow, Scandals Shake A Storied Ballet

Sergei Filin, artistic director of the Moscow Bolshoi Theatre's Bolshoi Ballet, was nearly blinded by an attacker on Jan. 17.
Yuri Kadobnov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:47 am

It's a story right out of the movies: The artistic director of one of the most prestigious ballet companies in the world is violently attacked. His attacker and the motive are shrouded in mystery. But behind these sensational headlines is a ballet company that is both legendary and plagued with scandals and infighting.

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The Two-Way
1:05 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Study: Some Birds, Like People, Have Awareness Of Mates' Feelings

A eurasian jay gives its mate a food gift.
University of Cambridge

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 1:22 pm

British scientists have discovered something remarkable: Like some of us humans, Eurasian Jays — who share a family with blue jays and ravens — seem to have the ability to recognize and ascertain the "internal life" or psychological states of others.

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Business
1:00 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

How One Company Reinvented The Hand Dryer

Craig McCarl dips Xlerator covers two at a time into a chrome bath. He has worked for Excel Dryer in East Longmeadow, Mass., for 31 years.
Andrea Hsu NPR

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:52 am

There's a lot of talk in politics about the desirability of American manufacturing and "green" jobs. President Obama talks about both often, especially wind turbines and long-lasting batteries that are made on U.S. soil.

Robert Siegel, host of All Things Considered, recently visited a Massachusetts factory that makes a product that hits those same parameters. It's arguably a force for sustainability, nearly 40 Americans assemble it, and it's an interesting case study in innovation: the high-speed hand dryer.

'We Had A Product People Hated To Use'

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The Two-Way
12:39 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Alabama Hostage Standoff Ends; Kidnapped Child Is Safe

Posters for Ethan decorate power poles all over town, like this one outside the elementary school in Midland City, Ala.
Butch Dill AP

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 2:09 am

Nearly a week after it began, the standoff in Midland City, Ala., where a 5-year-old-boy has been held captive in an underground bunker, has come to an end.

Citing a U.S. official, CBS News reports the "kidnapped child is alive [and the] kidnapper is dead."

CNN reports that an "explosion" was followed by "gun shots" shortly before the standoff came to an end.

State Rep. Steve Clouse said the boy is at a hospital seven or eight miles away from Midland City and he is "relatively healthy."

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Shots - Health News
12:32 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Aging Poorly: Another Act Of Baby Boomer Rebellion

Health researchers say the proportion of people in their late 40s to 60s with diabetes, hypertension or obesity has increased over the past two decades.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 5:40 am

Baby boomers have a reputation for being addicted to exercise and obsessed with eating well.

But that story didn't jibe with what physician Dana E. King and his colleagues see walking through the door of their family practice every day in Morgantown, W.Va.

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The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

How Do Israeli And Palestinian Textbooks Treat The Other Side?

Palestinian students attend a class in the West Bank city of Ramallah on Sunday.
Majdi Mohammed AP

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 3:48 am

There was some good news and bad news in a three-year study that tried to take an objective look at bias in Israeli and Palestinian textbooks directed against "the other."

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Music News
11:39 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Remembering Karen Carpenter, 30 Years Later

Karen Carpenter, of The Carpenters, performs in London in 1974.
Tim Graham Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 11:38 am

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Music Reviews
11:32 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Is Fleetwood Mac's Expanded 'Rumours' A Bit Much?

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 5:29 am

An expanded version of Fleetwood Mac's 1977 album Rumours comes out this week, to mark the 35th anniversary of one of the top-selling albums of the '70s. The deluxe set includes demos, outtakes from the recording sessions, live recordings and a documentary DVD, along with a vinyl pressing of the original album.

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The Two-Way
11:09 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Pentagon Will Brief Congress On Deadly Sept. 14 Camp Bastion Attack

More than four months after a deadly attack at a sprawling allied base in Afghanistan that killed two U.S. Marines, there are lingering questions about how it happened.

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