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Around the Nation
10:29 pm
Sun January 27, 2013

Hemp Gets The Green Light In New Colorado Pot Measure

Hemp products for sale in Washington, D.C., in 2010. The U.S. is the world's largest consumer of hemp products, although growing hemp is illegal under federal law. Colorado recently passed a measure that legalizes growing hemp.
Tim Sloan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 5:13 am

With recreational marijuana now legal in Colorado, small-scale pot shops will open up soon in places like Denver and Boulder. But that's not the only business that could get a boost: Large-scale commercial farmers may also be in line to benefit.

Why? When Colorado voters legalized marijuana last November, they also legalized hemp.

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Shots - Health News
10:25 pm
Sun January 27, 2013

No Mercy For Robots: Experiment Tests How Humans Relate To Machines

Could you say "no" to this face? Christoph Bartneck of the University of Canterbury in New Zealand recently tested whether humans could end the life of a robot as it pleaded for survival.
Christoph Bartneck

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 12:15 pm

In 2007, Christoph Bartneck, a robotics professor at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, decided to stage an experiment loosely based on the famous (and infamous) Milgram obedience study.

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Music Interviews
1:34 pm
Sun January 27, 2013

Big Freedia Lays Out The Basics Of Bounce

Big Freedia (the stage name of New Orleans native Freddie Ross) is one of the biggest stars of the hip-hop subculture known as bounce.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 6:29 am

Born out of New Orleans club culture, bounce music isn't just best experienced in person — it's almost impossible to understand in the abstract. But Big Freedia (pronounced "free-duh"), one of the style's biggest stars, says the music does have a few defining features.

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Around the Nation
12:54 pm
Sun January 27, 2013

A Doctor's Kindness Gives Homeless Inventor A Second Chance

Mike Williams (left) was homeless and broke in Sacramento, Calif., when he met Dr. Jong Chen. Now the two men are working together to develop a portable housing pod for the homeless.
Courtesy of Mike Williams

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 1:34 pm

In California in the early 1980s, a cracked tooth sent Mike Williams to the dentist's office.

When Williams asked to see the tooth, the dentist said he had a mirror but that there was no camera or anything to show people the insides of their mouths. So, Williams invented one: the first intraoral camera.

His invention was a big success, and it led to other medical technology ventures that made him millions of dollars. Williams' career as an inventor and entrepreneur took off, but it wouldn't last.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
11:58 am
Sun January 27, 2013

The Movie Common Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Eddie Murphy in John Landis' comedy Coming to America.
Paramount The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 1:34 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

The movie that rapper-actor Common, whose credits include Brown Sugar, American Gangster, Just Wright and LUV — currently playing in theaters — could watch a million times is John Landis' Coming to America.

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World
11:58 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Egyptian President Declares State Of Emergency

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 1:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SMITH, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Smith.

Friday was the second anniversary of the uprising in Egypt, the topple of the president there, Hosni Mubarak. The anniversary sparked massive protests against the new government, the Islamist government. The violence has left more than 40 people dead.

In a forceful address to the nation earlier today, Egypt's president declared a 30-day state of emergency in three Egyptian cities. NPR's Leila Fadel joins us to discuss the latest. Hey, Leila.

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Politics
11:58 am
Sun January 27, 2013

The Senate And Its Finicky Filibuster Relationship

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 1:34 pm

This week, the Senate passed a rules change to make it just a little harder for members to start a filibuster. Some think it's not enough action, and others think it's too limiting, but most agree that a compromise is better than nothing. Weekends on All Things Considered host Robert Smith talks with political scientist Sarah Binder about how the filibuster grew in to such a road-blocking nuisance in the first place, and asks Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., and Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., what these changes will mean for the senate filibuster.

Author Interviews
11:21 am
Sun January 27, 2013

'Manifest Injustice': A 40-Year Fight For Freedom

Henry Holt

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 1:34 pm

In 1962, a grisly double murder on a deserted stretch of desert rocked a small community outside Phoenix.

A young couple had been shot to death in a case that stumped Maricopa County investigators. Then, something happened that should have cracked it wide open: A man named Ernest Valenzuela confessed to the crime. But police didn't pursue the lead, just one misstep in an investigation and eventual trial that were rife with irregularities.

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The Two-Way
6:41 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Mass Funeral Held For Riot Dead In Egyptian Town

Relatives of the Egyptian policemen who were killed in Port Said grieve during their military funeral in Cairo on Sunday.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 1:09 pm

Update at 6:10 p.m. ET Morsi Declares State Of Emergency

In a televised address Sunday night, Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi declared a 30-day state of emergency and night curfew in three provinces hit hard by recent violence.

NPR's Leila Fadel says it means that during this time the government can arrest anyone they want if they look "fishy," and they can use the full force of the state to try and quell the city.

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The Two-Way
5:38 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Gun-Control Advocates Should Listen More, Obama Says

President Obama, accompanied by Vice President Joe Biden, talks at the White House on Jan. 16 about proposals to reduce gun violence. Obama has called for a ban on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines and is pushing other policies in the wake of the mass shooting last month at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn.
Charles Dharapak AP

President Obama said that those support gun control should "do a little more listening" to differing viewpoints in the debate over firearms in the U.S.

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The Two-Way
4:24 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Mali Crisis Likely To Dominate Summit Of African Leaders

Malian soldiers man a checkpoint on the Gao road outside Sevare, some 385 miles north of Mali's capital, Bamako, on Sunday.
Jerome Delay AP

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 5:03 am

African leaders are meeting Sunday for talks likely to be dominated by the crisis in Mali where the French-led intervention against Islamist rebels is gaining strength.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is monitoring the summit that is taking place at African Union headquarters in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, for our Newscast team. Here's what she says:

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The Two-Way
3:49 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Scores Killed In Brazilian Nightclub Blaze

A man carries an injured victim of a fire at the Kiss club in Santa Maria city, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil, on Sunday.
AP

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:46 am

Update at 12:15 p.m. ET Toll Revised

Here's the most-recent information we have on the deadly fire in Santa Maria:

-- Maj. Cleberson Bastianello Braida now says 232 people were killed – and not 245 as had been reported earlier. He said 117 people had been hospitalized. He made the announcement at a news conference in the Municipal Sports Center.

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Energy
12:52 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Focus On Fracking Diverts Attention From Horizontal Drilling

Opponents of fracking demonstrate during the Winter X Games 2012 in Aspen, Colo.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 5:00 am

Mention the recent surge in oil and natural gas production in the U.S. and one word comes to mind for a lot of people: "fracking." Hydraulic fracturing is a controversial technique that uses water, sand and potentially hazardous chemicals to break up rock deep underground to release oil and natural gas.

But there's another technology that is just as responsible for drilling booms happening across the country: horizontal drilling.

Environmental Consequences

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Remembrances
12:45 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Saying Goodbye To Bedford Street's Tireless Collector

Alice Elliott, producer of the documentary The Collector of Bedford Street, laughs with Larry Selman in 2003. Selman died Jan. 20. He was 70.
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 10:54 am

Larry Selman devoted more than half his life collecting money for multiple charities, on the streets of New York, from total strangers. He did this for nearly 40 years, despite the fact he was developmentally disabled. Selman became the subject of filmmaker Alice Elliott's Oscar-nominated documentary, The Collector of Bedford Street. He died Jan.

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It's All Politics
12:36 am
Sun January 27, 2013

The GOP And Taxes: In The States, It Can Get Complicated

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence delivers his State of the State address to a joint session of the Legislature in Indianapolis on Tuesday.
Darron Cummings AP

When Republican Mike Pence replaced Mitch Daniels as governor of Indiana this month, he wasted no time setting out to establish his conservative fiscal bona fides.

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Animals
12:34 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Like Sumo Wrestling, With Lots Of Spit: Camels Tussle In Turkey

Two camels fight during the Camel Wrestling Championship in the town of Selcuk, near the western coastal city of Ismir, Turkey, on Jan. 15, 2012. It's the biggest event of the camel-wrestling season in Turkey.
Tolga Bozoglu EPA /Landov

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 5:00 am

"Obama vs. Rambo" may sound like an Onion headline for the gun control debate. But it's actually a must-see matchup for spectators on Turkey's Aegean Coast. The competitors? Two male, or bull, camels.

The biggest event of Turkey's camel wrestling season takes place each year in the town of Selcuk, near the ancient ruins of Ephesus.

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Latin America
12:31 am
Sun January 27, 2013

'Sick And Tired,' Residents In Southern Mexico Defend Themselves

Masked and armed men guard a roadblock near the town of Ayutla, Mexico, on Jan. 18. Hundreds of men in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero have taken up arms to defend their villages against drug gangs.
Dario Lopez-Mills AP

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 5:00 am

On the main road into the Mexican town of Ayutla, about 75 miles southeast of Acapulco, about a dozen men cradling shotguns and rusted machetes stand guard on a street corner. Their faces are covered in black ski masks.

The men are part of a network of self-defense brigades, formed in the southern state of Guerrero to combat the drug traffickers and organized crime gangs that terrorize residents.

The brigades have set up roadblocks, arrested suspects and are set on running the criminals out of town.

Taking Control

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U.S.
1:34 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

Investing In Citizenship: For The Rich, A New Road To The U.S.

The Barclays Center in New York, the new home of the Brooklyn Nets, was built partially with investment from overseas donors seeking U.S. citizenship. A little-known immigration program allows wealthy investors to get a green card in exchange for funding American businesses.
Bruce Bennett Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 9:17 am

The traditional immigrant story is a familiar one.

Someone who longs for a better life makes the tough journey, leaves behind the hardships of his or her native land and comes to the United States to start again. That story, in a lot of ways, helped build this country.

These days, however, there's a very different kind of immigrant who wants to come to this country — the rich — and they have a different set of dreams.

Anthony Korda was a barrister, or lawyer, in England who vacationed frequently in the U.S. with his family.

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

.Gov Site Goes Down; Anonymous Claims Responsibility

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 1:47 am

The hacker-activist group Anonymous is claiming responsibility for taking down a government website Saturday. NPR's Giles Snyder reports for our Newscast unit:

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Author Interviews
12:40 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

Ship Those (Virtual) Chips: The Rise And Fall Of Online Poker's Youngest Crew

Ship It Holla Ballas by Jonathan Grotenstein and Storms Reback.
Guy Bubb Courtesy Getty Images/Gallo Images

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 1:59 pm

In the early 2000s, the get-rich-quick scheme of choice for young college dropouts was poker — and not your grandfather's poker, with clinking chips on green felt tables. Online poker. For a few years it was a national obsession for a generation of young men who grew up playing hours and hours of video games.

Many of these players couldn't get into casinos because they were underage, but they used their brains and introductory statistics courses to rake in millions, often playing 10 or more games simultaneously on huge computer monitors.

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Performing Arts
12:02 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

The 'Life And Times' Takes Audiences On A Lengthy Journey

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 1:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SMITH, HOST:

Hey, thanks for sticking with us. It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Smith.

Opening this week in New York City, you can see a musical that demands a little something extra from its audience: endurance. The show is called "Life and Times," and it is more than 10 hours from start to finish. It's a production of Soho Rep at the Public Theater. And before the musical starts, the audience has that focus that you only see in marathon runners, preparing for the long haul.

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World
12:02 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

Predictions, Warnings Round Out World Economic Forum

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 1:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SMITH, HOST:

I don't know about you, but there's been something wrong in the United States this week. It felt a little bit - I don't know - more poor, less fabulous. Ah, of course, of course, the rich and powerful folks of the world and the United States are all in Davos, Switzerland, attending the World Economic Forum. That's where the big names in business and politics get together in the Alps.

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Analysis
12:02 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

Week In News: A Rocky Start To Obama's Second

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 1:34 pm

Less than a week into his second term, President Obama has already met with resistance over procedural matters, such as his use of the recess appointment to circumvent the Senate confirmation process. Weekends on All Things Considered host Robert Smith speaks with James Fallows, national correspondent for The Atlantic.

Movies I've Seen A Million Times
12:02 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

The Movie Jeffrey Wright Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Dennis Hopper, Martin Sheen, and Frederic Forrest survey a temple in a scene from Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now.
United Artist Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 1:34 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For actor Jeffrey Wright, whose credits include Basquiat, Syriana, W. and Broken City (currently playing in theaters) — the movie he could watch a million times is Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now.

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The Two-Way
10:08 am
Sat January 26, 2013

Newtown Residents Join Gun Control Rally In Washington

Newtown, Conn., residents Darren Wagner and Georgia Monaghan traveled to Washington, D.C., to attend the gun control rally on Saturday.
Lizzie Chen NPR

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 1:47 am

Residents of Newtown, Conn., where 20 children died in December's school shootings, marched alongside other supporters of gun control at a rally on the National Mall on Saturday.

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World
2:43 am
Sat January 26, 2013

Pinup Moms Reveal How Far They'll Go To Raise Funds

"Ms. October" is one of several moms who posed for a calendar to raise funds for school bus service in their Spanish town. The page reads, "No to the budget cuts!"
Lauren Frayer for NPR

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 12:36 pm

Spain's economic woes have forced municipalities across the nation to cut back on all kinds of basic services. In the small town of Montserrat, 20 miles inland from the Mediterranean, not even the school bus was spared.

To restore service, neighborhood mothers came up with a rather racy idea to raise money: They transformed themselves into calendar girls.

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Around the Nation
2:43 am
Sat January 26, 2013

Help Slow To Come For Returning U.S. Veterans

Hundreds of veterans and military spouses meet with prospective employers at the Hiring Our Heroes job fair at Nationals Park in Washington, D.C., in December. Veterans say they're still having trouble finding jobs and getting other types of assistance.
Larry French AP/National Chamber Foundation

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 12:36 pm

As thousands of troops are set to return from Afghanistan over the next two years, veterans on the homefront say they want to see increased reintegration support this year.

The latest jobs report — and the first of the new year — shows a dismal picture for the nation's newest veterans. Unemployment among those who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan stands at 10.8 percent — far higher than the national rate of 7.8 percent.

It's a number that has veterans and their advocates concerned.

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Opinion
2:43 am
Sat January 26, 2013

In Paris, A Hunt For Those Who Dodge Dog Duties

The streets of Paris are marred by messes from dogs whose owners haven't cleaned up after them. There's a fine, but the culprits have to be caught in the act (or lack thereof).
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 12:36 pm

This essay by NPR correspondent Eleanor Beardsley was borne out of the personal exasperation of living in a beautiful city with one thing she found very, very wrong.

When you walk down the grand boulevards of the City of Light, you have to be careful where you step.

Every day, my senses are assaulted by the piles I have to dodge in the Parisian streets. There are the fresh ones that leave me feeling angry, and the ones from the previous days that have begun to smear down the street on the bottoms of people's shoes.

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NPR Story
2:36 am
Sat January 26, 2013

Egypt Looks To Secure Loan As Feeding Families Gets Harder

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 12:36 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The Egyptian military's been deployed to the streets of Port Said today. Riots erupted in that city last night just northeast of Cairo after a controversial court verdict. At least 25 people have been reported dead. The violence comes amid mass street protests in Egypt against the ruling Muslim Brotherhood.

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NPR Story
2:36 am
Sat January 26, 2013

As Apple Flounders, Samsung Gains Strength

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 12:36 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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