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The Two-Way
2:17 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Neil Gaiman Posts Note From Actress With A Role In 'Innocence Of Muslims'

Details are still emerging about the people who made Innocence of Muslims, a purportedly feature-length film whose online trailer has ignited anti-U.S. protests and violence in Egypt, Libya and other nations. Some of the actors involved have publicly rejected the film — and that list now includes actress Anna Gurji, who asked writer Neil Gaiman for help in making her story public.

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It's All Politics
2:08 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

As Mitt Romney Woos Latinos, Obama's Team Derides A 'Makeover'

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney made his pitch for Latino votes at the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce convention in Los Angeles on Monday.
Charles Dharapak AP

Mitt Romney made yet another attempt Monday to narrow President Obama's substantial polling lead over him with Latino voters.

The Republican presidential nominee spoke at the Los Angeles convention of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce where he was respectfully received.

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Presidential Race
1:39 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Romney Disparages Obama Voters In Hidden Video

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now to a development surrounding Mitt Romney's campaign. After several days of stumbles on the trail and internal squabbling spilling into public view, Romney's campaign vowed to get back to substance today. Romney delivered a speech to a Latino group in Los Angeles today touting his economic plan and touching on immigration. But the spotlight was stolen by a report on the website Mother Jones.

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It's All Politics
1:21 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Despite Recent Romney Stumbles, Presidential Race Is Far From Over

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney addresses the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Monday in Los Angeles.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:53 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney appears a man under siege.

His political strategists are feuding over the direction of the campaign. He bungled his "presidential moment" with an ill-timed and ill-informed response to violence in Libya that led to the death of a U.S. ambassador and three other Americans.

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'Another Thing': Test Your Clever Skills
1:21 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

'Another Thing': Obie The Dachshund's Big Slim-Down

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:57 am

Each week, All Things Considered and Lenore Skenazy, author of the book and blog Free-Range Kids, bring you "Another Thing," an on-air puzzle to test your cleverness skills. We take a trend in the news and challenge you to help us satirize it with a song title, a movie name or something else wacky.

This week's challenge: The owner of a 77-pound dachshund named Obie is blogging about her efforts to slim him down by 40 pounds. If she succeeds, we can probably expect a book.

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Middle East
12:53 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

As Sanctions Take A Toll, Debate In Iran Heats Up

Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei delivers a speech in Tehran in July. Khamenei says Western-led sanctions will not force Iran to change its policies, but there are signs of other concerned voices in Iran.
AP

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:41 pm

Yukiya Amano is frustrated.

Last week, Amano, the director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, told a meeting of the agency in Vienna that he is aggravated by Iran's unwillingness to show the IAEA what's going on at a base called Parchin.

"Iran should engage with us without further delay on the substance of our concerns," he said. "We need to stop going around in circles, discussing process."

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It's All Politics
12:33 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Obama, Romney In Tug Of War Over China Trade

Shipping containers sit at a port in Tianjin, China, on Feb. 28.
Alexander F. Yuan AP

Originally published on Sun October 21, 2012 1:04 pm

President Obama kicked off the week in the battleground state of Ohio, where he spent much of the time Monday talking about China.

His administration filed a new trade complaint against China with the World Trade Organization on Monday. The White House is challenging Chinese subsidies for auto parts.

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The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Occupy Wall Street Marks One-Year Anniversary; More Than 100 Arrested

A man looks down at a sign during the Occupy Wall Street protest on the one year anniversary of the movement in New York.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

The one-year anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street movement brought rallies and arrests Monday, as protesters marched in New York and other cities. More than 100 arrests were reported in New York, where activists marched near the city's stock exchange.

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Presidential Race
12:05 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Obama Files New Trade Complaint Against China

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:39 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish. We begin this hour with President Obama on the campaign trail. He was in the battleground state of Ohio today, but he spent much of his time talking about China. President Obama even announced a new trade complaint against China during a campaign stop in Cincinnati.

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All Tech Considered
12:03 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Singapore's Rising Tech Industry Draws Expat Innovators And Investors

Andrew Roth is co-founder of Perx, a Singapore-based firm that uses smartphones as virtual loyalty cards.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:39 pm

For the past six years in a row, the World Bank has rated the Southeast Asian city-state of Singapore as the easiest place in the world to do business. Drawn in part by this reputation, money and talent are pouring into the island nation's growing technology sector.

One of Facebook's co-founders recently renounced his American citizenship and relocated to Singapore, where he has been investing in tech startups.

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Reporter's Notebook
11:31 am
Mon September 17, 2012

For Liberian Youth, A Creative Outlet In Krumping

Franklyn Dunbar, 17, practices krumping with his crew at his mother's house in Paynesville, a suburb of Monrovia, Liberia. Dunbar was born in New York, but moved to his home country of Liberia seven years ago.
Tamasin Ford NPR

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:39 pm

The music starts up, masking the blare of the generator needed to power the stereo. The dancers begin, and almost like a relay, they take turns showing their moves. Their bodies shake and contort to the beat. Their eyes are fixed in a stare with a fierce look of anger as they lose themselves in the music.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:25 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Medicaid Helps Washington, D.C., Clinic Care For Ex-Prisoners

A Unity Health Care patient gets his ears checked.
Unity Health Care

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:39 pm

Dr. Ilse Levin specializes in internal medicine, but you could say she really focuses on incarceration medicine.

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Science
11:16 am
Mon September 17, 2012

What Drove Early Man Across Globe? Climate Change

An artist's re-creation of the first human migration to North America from across the Bering Sea.
DEA Picture Library De Agostini/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:39 pm

Anthropologists believe early humans evolved in Africa and then moved out from there in successive waves. However, what drove their migrations has been a matter of conjecture.

One new explanation is climate change.

Anthropologist Anders Erikkson of Cambridge University in England says the first few hardy humans who left Africa might've gone earlier but couldn't. Northeastern Africa — the only route to Asia and beyond — was literally a no man's land.

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The Salt
11:09 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Shriveled Mich. Apple Harvest Means Fewer Jobs, Tough Year Ahead

A lonely Michigan apple.
Noah Adams NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 9:42 am

An apple a day might keep the doctor away, but what do you do when there are no apples? It's a question western Michigan's apple growers are dealing with this season after strange weather earlier in the year decimated the state's apple cultivation.

Michigan is the third-largest apple producer in the U.S. after New York and Washington, but the state's apples will soon be in short supply. Now in the middle of harvest season, growers are picking only 10 percent to 15 percent of their normal crop.

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The Two-Way
11:02 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Canada Stops Its Defense Of Asbestos, As Quebec's Mines Close For Good

A former Asbestos plant is seen February in Thetford Mines, Quebec. Canada has ended its refusal to allow chrysotile asbestos to be added to the U.N.'s Rotterdam Convention on hazardous materials.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:45 am

Canada's leaders have ended their country's longstanding resistance to asbestos being called a dangerous material under United Nations guidelines, a decision that reflects a shift in the leadership of Quebec province, home of Canada's asbestos industry.

Quebec's incoming premier, Pauline Marois, promised late in her campaign that she would shut down the region's asbestos mines for good. She says that she will use money that would have gone to restart the mines to diversify the local economy.

As Dan Karpenchuk reports for NPR's Newscast unit:

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Shots - Health Blog
10:35 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Where There's 'Sexting,' There May Be Sex

When texts become "sexts."
iStockphoto.com

How many teens are sending sexual photos or texts by phone? And what else are they doing?

Researchers surveyed nearly 2,000 high schoolers in Los Angeles to find out. Among kids who had cellphones or access to them (and that cover almost all of them), about 15 percent reported "sexting."

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It's All Politics
9:38 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Football And (Conservative) Politics Do Mix For Some NFL Fans

Rowdy Smith, who brought his sons to the St. Louis Rams game on Sunday, said that President Obama's "not a leader" and is hurting the energy industry. He's shown here walking in front of the Americans for Prosperity campaign bus.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 10:18 am

There's nothing like a ready-made crowd to help a group get its message out. That's why a conservative political organization set up shop Sunday outside the St. Louis Rams-Washington Redskins NFL football game.

Why mix politics and football?

"People are here," explained Patrick Werner, Missouri state director for Americans for Prosperity.

Football fans are used to encountering promotional tents for sports-talk radio stations and brands of beer and mixed nuts on their way to the game. Not so many of them expect to discuss politics as part of the pregame festivities.

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The Two-Way
8:51 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Family Of Man Behind Anti-Islam Video Flees Home

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:42 am

In the pre-dawn hours today the wife, two sons and daughter of the man most prominently linked to the anti-Islam video that has sparked violence in many Muslim cities fled their home in Cerritos, Calif.

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Makers Of the DipJar Hope That Dipping To Tip Catches On

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:46 am

As Americans increasingly rely on cards, not cash, to pay for small items like coffee and snacks, it's not always easy to tip the baristas and counter folks who make those transactions run smoothly. A new device called the "Dip Jar" might fix that, by allowing customers to dip a card to give $1 to the staff.

That might come as welcome news to workers behind the counter, who've seen debit and credit cards take over from cash. As a result, there's less change from which to pull a tip for the traditional jar that's often seen on counters where coffee, beer, or sandwiches are sold.

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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Chicago's Mayor Emanuel Asks Court To Order Teachers Back To School

Striking Chicago public school teachers outside of George Westinghouse College Prep high school earlier today.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Following through on what he said he would do if the city's teachers didn't end their week-old strike and return to their classrooms, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has asked a judge to intervene.

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The Two-Way
7:25 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Astronauts Return From Space Station, As An American Takes Command

The Soyuz capsule lands with Commander Gennady Padalka of Russia, NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Revin aboard, near the town of Arkalyk, Kazakhstan. The capsule's final meter of descent is eased by braking engines.
Carla Cioffi NASA

U.S. astronaut Sunita Williams is now in command of the International Space Station, after receiving control of the facility this weekend. Three departing astronauts whose capsule left the station early Monday landed safely three and a half hours later.

For NPR's Newscast, Peter van Dyk filed this report from Moscow:

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Economy
6:34 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Is The 'Fiscal Cliff' As Bad As It Sounds?

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 7:29 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, last year the Occupy Wall Street movement dominated headlines for weeks and added terms like the 99 percent to our political vocabularies. But a year after the protests started we wanted to know where the movement stands now. We're going to call writer and activist Debra Dickerson about this. She's at the heart of the anniversary protest. That's later in the program.

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Politics
6:34 am
Mon September 17, 2012

A Year On, What Did 'Occupy' Accomplish?

The Occupy Wall Street movement marks its first anniversary this week. Its supporters argue that it elevated the issue of economic inequality, but others say it made more noise than change. Host Michel Martin discusses the movement with author Debra Dickerson, who is still participating in protests and writes about them for Slate.com.

Food
6:34 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Are You A Sellout If You Cook For Your Man?

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 7:03 am

For generations women have been told, if you want a man, learn to cook. That's exactly why feminist writer Shayla Pierce stayed out of the kitchen. But now she finds herself with a boyfriend, learning to cook, and wondering if that makes her a sellout. She speaks with host Michel Martin about her article and her change of heart.

The Two-Way
6:33 am
Mon September 17, 2012

A Los Alamos Landmark, The 'Black Hole,' Is About To Disappear

"Atomic Ed" Grothus at the Black Hole surplus story in Los Alamos, N.M., in 2008.
John Burnett NPR

It's called the Black Hole because "everything goes in and nothing comes out," as founder Ed Grothus told NPR's John Burnett in 2008.

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The Picture Show
6:29 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Same Camera, Different Century: Capturing Civil War Sites, 150 Years Later

Here's a snapshot from the field as Harrington composed his image of Burnside Bridge — which involved schlepping the huge, fragile camera down a steep incline to get the right perspective.
Claire O'Neill (@clairevoyant) Instagram

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:39 pm

Believe it or not, there's a lot of food involved in wet-plate photography. Egg whites (albumen) are used to make the glass plates adhesive to the light-sensitive chemicals. And one way to keep the plates from drying out after processing is to coat them in honey. It's also physically demanding, so you get really hungry.

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The Two-Way
6:24 am
Mon September 17, 2012

China Ratchets Up The Rhetoric In Island Spat With Japan

Protesters marched in front of the Japanese Embassy in Beijing today. They carried a banner declaring: "We are proud of China's rise. We resolutely oppose Japan's rightist forces."
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:52 am

China's state-run media is warning that Japan could endure another "lost decade" of economic stagnation should Beijing resort to trade retaliation over Japan's purchase of disputed islands.

The warning comes amid a surge of anti-Japanese nationalism across China that sparked huge and sometimes violent protests over the weekend. As the economic cost of the protests begins to escalate, it's becoming clearer exactly who might be behind them.

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The Salt
5:35 am
Mon September 17, 2012

U.S. Kids Eat Nearly As Much Salt As Adults, Putting Health At Risk

It's going to take a lot more than emptying the salt shaker to cut back on the sodium U.S. kids are getting.
L. Marie Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 9:42 am

Yes, we love salt. It makes everything taste better. But as a society, we're eating way too much of it. And, so are our children.

A new study from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that children in the U.S. between the ages of 8 and 18 are eating, on average, 3,387 mg per day. That's about the same amount as adults. But it's a lot more than the 2,300 mg daily limit recommended by the federal dietary guidelines.

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Politics
5:16 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Obama Launching China Trade Case

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:52 am

President Obama will launch a new trade enforcement case against China Monday, using the power of incumbency to counter Republican Mitt Romney's criticism that he is ceding American jobs to the Asian power.

The Two-Way
5:05 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Short Track Speedskating Coach Put On Leave Amid Abuse Allegations

Short track speedskating coach Jae Su Chun was a guest at a State Dinner at the White House in May 2010.
Alexis C. Glenn UPI /Landov

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:19 pm

U.S. Speedskating has placed head short track coach Jae Su Chun on administrative leave in response to complaints of physical, verbal and psychological abuse.

Nineteen current and former skaters, including five Olympic medalists, signed complaints filed with U.S. Speedskating and the U.S. Olympic Committee. An attorney for the skaters says two of the athletes are also completing police reports in Utah, where U.S. Speedskating is based and where the athletes train.

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