Cindee Talley

Regional Programming Director

As Regional Programming Director, Cindee develops and produces HPPR’s regional information and feature programming, including working closely with volunteer individuals and organizations from across the region with knowledge, experience and perspectives to share.

Cindee is a native of Western Nebraska and a graduate of the University of South Dakota who followed her love of public radio and passion for rural life to High Plains Public Radio.  She joined HPPR in August, 2010, assuming the role of Regional Programming Director.  Simply put, she strives to provide listeners a sense of the High Plains- in all its dimensions of environment, history, enterprise, and culture that stretch beyond geography.  

Location:Garden City, KS studios

Phone: (800) 678-7444 or (620) 275-7444

Ways to Connect

With the Zika virus now in the Sunflower State, state agencies and university laboratories are searching for methods to keep the number of cases at a minimum. KMUW's Abigail Wilson has the story.

There's a new study out. It shows that health providers in states that expanded Medicaid are doing much better than providers in states that didn't expand the program.

Deb Oyler

The Radio Readers Book Club Spring Read concluded with a live two hour event on Sunday, May 1, 2016.  The panel discussed Kent Haruf's Plainsong, S.C. Gwynne's Empire of the Summer Moon, and Gail Caldwell's A Strong West Wind.  

The panel was:  Jane Holwerda from Dodge City, Kansas; Alex Hunt, Jonathan Baker, and Michael Grauer from Canyon, Texas; former Kansas Poet Laureate Denise Low, and Lynne Hewes from Cimarron, Kansas.  

quotesgram.com

Philipp Meyer recently spoke at West TExas A&M University in Canyon, Texas.  Cindee Talley had the opportunity to talk with him on the phone, and get to know the man a little bit better.

Cindee Talley

Luke, 

Thanks for letting me share my Texas Bucket List adventure, but mostly thanks for being my friend and my tour guide.  This trip was great because of you.  

Three of us, my dear friends Rick and Kelly Reece, and I left Western Nebraska on Wednesday morning with a goal of experiencing two destinations: Mark Balette's ranch near Goveton, Texas; and the Gulf Coast.

Paul Phillips

KATHLEEN HOLT :  Talk a little bit about Native Americans and film.  I think when we talk about the High Plains and a sense of place, we often think of it in terms of white settlement…

TOM AVERILL:  Well, yeah.  We also start with white exploration . .

TOM PRASCH:  As if there wasn’t anything to see

TOM AVERILL:  As if nothing existed until there was a white person to see it.  So, Coronado is our first tourist looking for the Seven Cities of Gold and unhappy with what he found.

TOM PRASCH:  They are figures in that whole conquest of the West motif.  You know one of our theme  when we look at Kansas film and literature is that whole manifest destiny sensibility that this is ours to settle and it is part of this drive that is going to push us to California and the rest.  And because most film making for most of the history of film has been told from that perspective, it gets a little hard to tell the Native American story.  And, in fact, we only really get a kind of counter reaction to that with the rise of AIM and Native American rights movements in the 1960s and 1970s and that’s when you get  Dustin Hoffman’s Little Big Man.   And there is an Altman film about that time – Sitting Bull – Oh,  Custer and Altman taking on the Custer story.  Suddenly, you get the sense that, “Oh, gee. We have been leaving some stuff out here.”  

Karen Madorin

Lex Nichols:

I was born and raised in Rocky Ford on the Arkansas River.  My dad still has a farm there.  Part of the Cherokee Trail ran through there up to Pueblo, Fountain and I believe it went on up and hooked to the Overland Trail that went up to Wyoming. My father has been working the field and plowed up some “mitades” and so we know that they stayed there. When I do recordings, I record my bird sounds and use them in my recordings, I try to do everything natural.

Russell Lee, August 1939 / FSA, Library of Congress

Today, you and I have the opportunity to sit down at Washburn University with professors Thomas Averill and Tom Prasch.  They’ll challenge us to think about types or are they stereotypes of people sharing our rural landscape.  Let’s drop in to Thomas Averill’s office and join the conversation.  

Kathleen Holt

I’m Cindee Talley.  Today, I’d like you to meet two of my Radio Reader Book Club Friends.. Kathi Holt and teacher, Lynn Hewes.  They’re sitting around the table at the historic Cimarron Hotel, talking about our current read… Plainsong.    

Their chat is a perfect example of the paying attention.. whether it be to our children, or our surroundings.  These two lovely women are so engrossed in their conversation, they had no idea they had captured the sound of a semi going by.  Kathleen starts the conversation:

Kathleen Holt:  Is there a place in our lives these days for parents and adolescents or adults and adolescents to discuss literature – to explore how we might look at this differently or similarly?

Kathleen Holt

Tom Averill and Tom Prasch: a discussion inspired by Kent Haruff's Plainsong.

Tom Averill:  Yeah, I’m particularly interested in Plainsong as a branch of small town literature that I study, whether it is in eastern Kansas or on the High Plains – small town literature and probably small town film, sort of have a certain number of things in common.

Tom Prasch: Yes.

Plainsong

Jan 20, 2016

Plainsong by Kent Haruf is the first selection for the 2016 Spring Read.    

“In the same way that the plains define the American landscape, small-town life in the heartlands is a quintessentially American experience. Holt, Colo., a tiny prairie community near Denver, is both the setting for and the psychological matrix of Haruf's beautifully executed . . . descriptions of rural existence where weather and landscape are integral to tone and mood, serving as backdrop to every scene. This is a compelling story of grief, bereavement, loneliness and anger, but also of kindness, benevolence, love and the making of a strange new family. In depicting the stalwart courage of decent, troubled people going on with their lives, Haruf's quietly eloquent account illumines the possibilities of grace.”  (From Publishers Weekly, Peter Matson, 1999)

Last year Governor Sam Brownback ordered an investigation to see if Planned Parenthood of Kansas and mid-Missouri were involved in selling fetal tissue. Brownback said he'd block Medicaid funding because of this reason. A recent report from the Board of Healing Arts seems to vindicate the organization.

As President Obama delivers his final State of the Union address, NPR will provide live anchored coverage of the speech as well as the Republican response from Governor Nikki Haley of South Carolina. NPR's special coverage with All Things Considered host Audie Cornish will start at 9pm EST/6pm PT on Tuesday, January 12. The broadcast special will air on Member Stations across the country (www.npr.org/stations) and be available at NPR.org, along with reports that unfold key issues, live updates and online resources that offer a deeper understanding of the annual speech.

kansascity.com

LAWRENCE – A new funding method for public schools is expected to dominate the debate in the Kansas Legislature this year, and Gov. Sam Brownback will outline his budget and policy priorities during his State of the State address.

High Plains Public Radio’s coverage begins this afternoon, January 12, at 5:30 central time.

This is the first week of the 2016 Kansas legislative session.

The speech will last approximately 30 minutes and will be followed by the Democratic Party response. 

The numbers are in, and the Sunflower State once again collected less tax revenue than expected. This deficit will deplete the state's small estimated savings account.

There are seven constitutional amendments up for vote today in Texas. They address issues ranging from highway funding and homestead exemptions to tax exemptions for spouses of disabled veterans and letting professional sports teams use their charitable foundations to hold raffles.

The statistics are in, and the unemployment rate in Kansas is down.

The voter registration debate continues with Kris Kobach and Hillary Clinton.

A western Kansas man is charged with voting in multiple Sherman County elections between 2012 and 2014 without being qualified. Secretary of State Kris Kobach is also charging Lincoln Wilson with committing election perjury. Two Johnson County residents are accused to voting in the 2010 general election without being lawfully registered Kansas voters. Few details have been released, but court documents show Kobach has worked with officials in surrounding states.

Winston Corfield

In this week's installment of Agland, Amy Bickel and Kathy Hanks give an update on a young farmer who was severely injured last harvest season.  The man was not expected to live, but life had other plans, and he's made it back just in time to help bring in this year's crops.  

Hoarding isn't confined to city limits.  The duo explore the phenomenon happening down on the farm.

findingmykd.blogspot.com

In this episode of Agland, it's about the State Fair Banana Bread Queen, a ghost town trying to come back to life, a fall harvest update, and the most beautiful Kansas places to visit in the fall.

cjonline.com

In the current Kansas political climate, it’s tough to be the Supreme Court Chief Justice.

How does one stay motivated when the judicial branch seems at odds with the legislative branch over school funding, selection of local chief judges, and the  division's budget is at risk if the selection law is struck down?  Add to that the judicial branch, comprised of 1,800 people, hasn't seen a raise in seven years.

Over 30,000 Kansas voter registrations are on hold because they don't include citizenship documents. Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach put a new rule in place cancelling those incomplete registrations after 90 days. Paul Davis, who was the Democratic candidate for governor last year, is heading up the lawsuit.

Most of us think of him as Newly O’Brien from the long running television series Gunsmoke. But, Buck Taylor first love was art says his wife Goldie. Taylor’s art is on exhibit along with a private collection of memorabilia from movies he’s been involved in during the Wild West Fest at the Boot Hill Museum in Dodge City. The exhibit features watercolor western scenes, images from Gunsmoke and Tombstone, as well as movie scripts and outfits. People are loving the traveling showcase says museum director Lara Brehm. She says most of the visitors are baby boomers who grew up watching Gunsmoke. Taylor will be in attendance at the reception being held at Boot Hill Museum Friday evening.

Today is the September Equinox. The number of hours in the day and night are equally balanced all over the world- that's about 12 hours. The change in tilt causes the seasons. Here in the United States, the fall equinox is usually characterized by huge variations in temperature. The leaves are changing color, and an increase in low pressure usually brings in more rain, and maybe snow.

Wes Jackson has headed the Land Institute since it was established in 1976. Next year he plans on stepping down from his leadership position.

A how-to recipe from the Huffington Post on how to create a teacher shortage following the Sunflower State example.

A letter from federal lab regulators cites K-State's "history of non-compliance" that has "raised serious concerns" about the school's ability to safely contain dangerous pathogens.

The rains have turned brown back to green once again, but in terms of the aquifer, it's not enough.

The Clean Power Plan tells each state how much carbon emission has to be reduced, but the state can decide how to meet the target. How that's going to work in Kansas is yet to be decided.

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