Cindee Talley

Regional Programming Director

As Regional Programming Director, Cindee develops and produces HPPR’s regional information and feature programming, including working closely with volunteer individuals and organizations from across the region with knowledge, experience and perspectives to share.

Cindee is a native of Western Nebraska and a graduate of the University of South Dakota who followed her love of public radio and passion for rural life to High Plains Public Radio.  She joined HPPR in August, 2010, assuming the role of Regional Programming Director.  Simply put, she strives to provide listeners a sense of the High Plains- in all its dimensions of environment, history, enterprise, and culture that stretch beyond geography.  

Location:Garden City, KS studios

Phone: (800) 678-7444 or (620) 275-7444

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Now that we’re used to seeing huge spinning blades across the high plains, there may be a new visual icon on the horizon in the future – enormous tall narrow poles that simply quiver in the wind. This report from Wired. They’re called Vortex Bladeless. Their purpose is the same: turning breezes into kinetic energy that can be used as electricity. But, that’s where the similarity to bladed wind turbines ends. Instead of capturing wind energy with the circular motion of a propeller, The Vortex uses vorticity. That’s an aerodynamic effect that produces a pattern of vortices. Whirling air patterns that are the enemy of architects and engineers, could now be have new purpose in renewable energy.

MU Extension

Last summer was a bad one for pinkeye in this part of the country.  The million dollar question is can anything be done to prevent it this summer?  The High Plains Journal reports there are vaccination programs, but there are also numerous strains of the disease.

Blue Bell Creameries has signed agreements with health officials in Texas and Oklahoma requiring the company to inform the states whenever there is a positive test result for listeria in its products or ingredients. For one year, Blue Bell ice cream must first test negative for listeria before it can be sold in stores.

The Kansas Senate voted not to allow grocery and convenience stores to sell full-strength beer. The proposal failed on an 11-26 vote. The laws surrounded alcohol sales have been a contentious issue in the Statehouse this year.

Kansas lawmakers say they've reach a compromise that will bring the ride-hailing service Uber back to the state.

The increased sale tax solution to the budget woes of the State of Kansas has been rejected. Legislators will return Monday to work on the issue.

Certified Angus Beef

We’ve all heard the phrase it takes a village to raise a child.  The same is true with exporting beef.  From logistics to linguistics, the teams working to export beef add well beyond $300 to the value of each head of cattle annually reports the High Plains Journal.

Here’s a glimpse at the role of three people making it happen.

A judicial bypass is when a judge gives a minor permission to have an abortion without her parent or guardian's consent. The bill is authored by Democratic State Representative Geanie Morrison. She says she wants the judge to see the minor in person without exception. The minor would also need to show a government-issued ID, and would require more time to pass before the judge could consent to the procedure.

Cattle prices and the possibility of a break in the drought has a Texas Panhandle family changing gears reports the Wall Street Journal. Rex McCloy and his two sons used to focus on growing cotton, corn, wheat, and soybeans. Now the family is betting the recent break in drought conditions will continue, and they’re investing in cattle. McCloy says three years ago there wasn't enough grass to feed a goat, let alone a cow. Now the family is building up the herd to capitalize on high cattle prices and lower feed costs.

The Texas Senate gave preliminary approval to a bill Monday that would protect churches and ministers from being sued if they refused to perform or host a same-sex marriage.

Kansas Legislators are considering undoing the elimination of business income tax cuts. The reductions were part of the 2012 tax cuts pushed by Governor Sam Brownback.

People from nine countries and seed librarians from across the country were busy sowing big ideas about tiny seeds during the first The International Seed Library Forum reports the Daily Yonder. The gathering was held in Tucson last week. The group shared ideas and inspiration for improving local access to diverse seeds. The conference also included discussion of climate change and the role agriculture diversity and seed saving play. Cary Fowler is an agricultural pioneer and a former executive director of the Global Crop Diversity Trust. He says in the past circumstances were adapted for the crops we wants to grow using things like irrigation and pesticides. He says in the future we’ll have to adapt the plants themselves.

A Kansas-based study comparing results on almost 30 years of winter wheat trials across the state points researchers to say global warming will cut wheat yields. Wheat demand is expected to increase by 60 percent by 2050 to meet population demands. A lead author of the study says one way of adapting the world to warming temperatures maybe be to shift wheat farming more toward the poles.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Scientists say oil and gas activity is probably responsible for the surge in earthquake activity in Oklahoma.  They call the phenomenon “induced seismicity.”  But, researchers are puzzled.  Oil and gas production is nothing new in the Sooner State, and why is there an increase in quakes in Oklahoma, or for that matter Texas, Colorado, and Kansas when it doesn’t seem to be happening in other major players like North Dakota?

An Amarillo native is the official state musician in 2016.  Joe Ely was one of eight artists appointed by the Texas Legislature according the Amarillo Globe News.  Ely began his musical career in Lubbock.

Ely says he’s humbled, and as a songwriter has always felt extremely fortunate to have grown up in an inspirational place with such a rich, compelling history filled with some of the most fascinating characters in the world.

Ely will serve a one year term.

Members of the Texas senate have unanimously approved a bill that legalizes marijuana oil for medicinal purposes. Texas Public Radio’s Ryan Poppe reports for those who interrupt it to mean that Texas has legalized marijuana, Tyler Republican Sen. Kevin Eltife says he has faced similar challenges educating fellow lawmakers on what exactly is cannabidiol or CBD oil.

Calvin Mattheis / The Hutchinson News

Kansas farmers are getting ready to bring in the wheat harvest, they are again being targeted to help make up Topeka’s budget woes reports Amy Bickel for Kansas Agland.

There’s a proposed $3 excise tax on all land- agricultural, residential, and commercial.  The bill is proposed by Sen Jeff Melcher- R-Leawood.

Under a clean power plan proposed by the federal government, states can develop their own strategies to limit carbon emissions. If they don’t, the feds will do it for them. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton says he plans to sue the Environmental Protection Agency over its plan for Texas.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is drawing more criticism about his order to monitor the federal military exercises known as "Jade Helm 15." This time it's from former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, a former GOP state representative and late-night host Jon Stewart.

Kansas Governor Sam Brownback vetoes bill requiring new insurance mandates and background checks for drivers of the ride service Uber.

When it comes to vaccinating to prevent the human papillomavirus, Kansas shares last place with Utah reports the Kansas Health Institute. The virus causes nearly all cases of cervical cancer. A partnership is working to improve that rate. The Kansas Foundation for Medical Care and the University of Kansas Cancer Center are concentrating their efforts on a key outreach component to ensure adolescent girls receive the full regimen.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has been on the receiving end of bi-partisan criticism since he ordered the Texas State Guard to monitor a training exercise by U.S. Special Operations Command. Abbott defended his actions, but also made a point of saying there is nothing for people to worry about. Abbott says his directive to the state guard was only to create an official channel of communication between the special forces training and the Governor's office. Jade Helm 15 is a two-month training exercise across several states where soldiers will "further develop tactics, techniques and procedures for emerging concepts in Special Operations warfare."

The Texas Senate approved a bill this week limited municipal control over oil and gas drilling and prohibiting any city from banning fracking. The Denton ban could eventually fall if the bill is signed by the governor.

Pam Zubeck / Colorado Springs Independent

Pam Zubeck remembers when the Arkansas River flowed every day outside Garden City, Kansas.  Zubeck writes of old-timers recounting about a river so wide, you had to board a ferry to cross in the Colorado Springs Independent.  High School kids used to pedal their bikes to the river to check fishing lines in the summer. 

Now, where there was once a river, there's a dry riverbed- a mecca for dirt bikers and four wheels.  It’s also home to water guzzling tamarisks. 

Lauren Coodley / History News Network

The nation’s top safety watchdog lacks the resources or ability to set and enforce rules in a timely manner reports The Washington Post.  In 2012, the Government Accountability office found it takes nearly eight years on average to issue a new rule.  That’s because of the heavy burden of documentation needed to withstand industry lawsuits and a budget that’s declined significantly since 2010.

Case in point is one of the most dangerous jobs in America- meatpacking.  There were over 28,000 reported injuries in 2013, but OSHA says it doesn’t have the resources or ability to set or enforce rules. 

Tyson Foods is the country's largest poultry producer. The company will stop feeding its chickens human antibiotics. Farmers raising livestock often add low-level antibiotics in an effort to treat disease, prevent disease from spreading, and also to help animals grow more quickly.

Highly contagious bird flu has infected more than 100 locations across the country. Despite disaster planning, this outbreak has been massive.

The companies managing Kansas' privatized Medicaid program continued to lose money in 2014. Amerigroup, Sunflower Health Plan and United Healthcare cut their losses from the year before, but still took a loss of $52 million. Losses totaled $116 million in 2013.

The Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurant chain announced this week that it has taken food products derived from genetically engineered crops off of its menu.

The National Teacher of the Year is an educator from Palo Duro High in Amarillo.  Shanna Peeples is the first Texas teacher to win the award since 1957. 

Peeples works in an environment where 85 percent of students live below the poverty line and where more refugee children are enrolled than in any high school in the district reports the Amarillo Globe News.