Cindee Talley

Regional Programming Director

As Regional Programming Director, Cindee develops and produces HPPR’s regional information and feature programming, including working closely with volunteer individuals and organizations from across the region with knowledge, experience and perspectives to share.

Cindee is a native of Western Nebraska and a graduate of the University of South Dakota who followed her love of public radio and passion for rural life to High Plains Public Radio.  She joined HPPR in August, 2010, assuming the role of Regional Programming Director.  Simply put, she strives to provide listeners a sense of the High Plains- in all its dimensions of environment, history, enterprise, and culture that stretch beyond geography.  

Location:Garden City, KS studios

Phone: (800) 678-7444 or (620) 275-7444

Ways to Connect

The landscape of southwestern Kansas is colored mostly shades of brown… dotted with circles of green…. with the distinct interruption of feedlots. But, in the small town of Ulysses, there’s a place that nurtures creative souls. Some call it “brush storming.” Local artists gathering around a table working on projects while they chat about life and ask each other for artistic advice. It’s like an old-fashioned quilting bee. The Main Artery also showcases the work of artists, but it’s more than a gallery says Tracy Teeter. She purchased the business in January. It’s also a creative workspace.. a place to perfect your skills… and gather with friends. The gallery started with 11 members over a decade ago. Today there are 21 different artists from a 100 mile radius.

Survey says…. most Kansas voters believe it’s wrong to discriminate against gay and transgender people, but they also value religious faith.  A recent survey by the Docking Institute of Public Affairs at Fort Hays State University reveals Kansans also reject attempts by some to push their beliefs onto others.

According to a press release from FHSU:

Dr. Chapman Rackaway, a Docking Fellow and an FHSU professor of political science, found that Kansans are largely divided on support for gay marriage, civil unions or neither.

Kansas Congresswoman Lynn Jenkins emphasized the role of women in community leadership when she delivered the Dole Lecture at the University of Kansas this weekend. Jenkins is a high-ranking Republican in the U.S. House. She also highlighted some of the challenges of a career in public office.

If you see smoke on the horizon, it could be deliberate. Some farmers burn their fields to get rid of plants that are there, and help those that are coming up.


The Kansas state highway fund will fall to nearly nothing in two years projects the Kansas Department of Transportation.  This report is from the Topeka Capital-Journal.  

A KDOT spreadsheet predicting cash flow through 2020 for the highway fund predicts the department will have an ending balance of only $6.9 million when ending balances typically exceed $100 million. 

The required ending minimum balance is $56 million.

Kent Olson is the director of KDOT’s division of fiscal and asset management.  He says there should be no practical impact to the agency’s work.

Last week brought some severe weather to the region. A video from social media shows the twister on Thursday in the Texas Panhandle. There were 11 tornado reports submitted to the National Weather Service on Thursday afternoon. Four in the Texas Panhandle and far western Oklahoma.

The Oklahoma state seismologist said disposal wells used by the oil and gas industry are ‘very likely’ responsible for the recent surge of earthquakes in Oklahoma at the recent Oklahoma Geological Survey.  This report is from State Impact Oklahoma.

Austin Holland says the rates and trends in seismicity are very unlikely to represent a naturally occurring process in a joint statement with agency interim director Richard D Andrews.

The agency’s acknowledgement follows years of peer-reviewed research linking disposal wells and earthquakes.

Oklahoma schools have the same budget as 2008, but 40,000 new students. That has schools dipping into their savings and running out of space.

Recent rains helped Kansas wheat fields, but one rain isn't going to save this year's wheat crop.

Governor Sam Brownback recently signed a “welfare reform” bill that his administration is calling the most comprehensive in the nation. Brownback signed the measure despite a wave criticism from those who say it punishes the poor.

Kansas state budget cuts are prompting school districts to take steps to save money. The Smoky Valley school district is the third school planning on closing early to save money. The school will close a week early to save about $10,000.

It's east versus west says Fort Hays State University professor. Chapman Rackaway is a political science professor. He says it the Kansas Legislature has gone from trying to keep western Kansas to showing it the door.

The number of rabies has doubled so far this year, and a K-State rabies expert says vaccinating your pets will help keep your family safe from the virus.

Gov Sam Brownback signed a bill into law that restricts the most common abortion technique. A similar bills looks like it will pass in Oklahoma. Missouri, South Carolina, and South Dakota has proposed similar bills.

There's a little place in the Texas Panhandle that was just named one of the 17 Texas barbecue joints you need to try before you die- Mike's BBQ Haven in Amarillo.

If you’re factoring in property tax rates when choosing where to live, Hawaii has the lowest real estate taxes in the United States according to a survey from WalletHub

RJ Sangosti / Denver Post

Colorado requires oil and gas companies to restore all sites completely to reduce erosion, loosen compacted soil, prevent dust storms, and control invasions of noxious weeds.  But, the state doesn’t set a timetable for getting the job done reports the Denver Post.

The land around about half of the inactive wells has yet to be restored, and 72 percent of these sites have been in process for more than five years.

Unlike many other states, Colorado doesn’t require companies to submit a reclamation plan prior to drilling.

The series continues with a look at the current drought conditions in the High Plains Public Radio listening region. In this installment, the question left dangling over our heads is, "Will the days of the Dust Bowl return?"

A Colorado Legislator is taking issue with the high school mascot in the southeastern community of Lamar. State Rep. Joe Salazar, D-Thornton, finds the name “Savages” repugnant reports the Denver Post. Salazar is co-sponsoring a bill that would require schools with American Indian names or mascots to get approval from a panel of tribal members or face steep fines. If the measure survives the Democratic-controlled House, GOP members say it won’t make it through the Republican-controlled Senate.

Water- without it life ceases to exist. In the first of a four-part series, Professor David Guth takes a look at the struggle to find balance between water conservation and an economy based on water and agriculture.

A Democratic representative is under investigation for comments she made in a committee meeting. Representative Valdenia Winn is accused to using "inflammatory" language according to the complaint lodged by nine Republican lawmakers in the Kansas House.

Walkers trek to Topeka hoping to get lawmakers and voters to pay attention to public school funding. This is the third year people have walked from Kansas City to the Capitol. The group wants increased education funding, not the newly approved block grant funding.

Farmers and ranchers have had a little more than a year to adjust to the Affordable Care Act. Some chafe against the requirement to buy health insurance, but others are starting to appreciate parts of the new law.

The Kansas House has given first-round approval to a bill that would allow most Kansans over age 21 to carry a concealed gun without a permit. Current law requires training and a background check before a person can carry concealed. The Senate concurred to the House amendments on this bill. That means it's now headed to the governor for consideration.

In a somewhat surprising move, the chairman of the state House Public Education committee says lawmakers will try to tackle the state’s school finance system this legislative session. That’s even while they await a ruling from the state Supreme Court on whether the finance system is constitutional.

A panel of House lawmakers discussed a proposal to change how marriage licenses are issued in Texas, giving that power to one appointed official.

Who owns the water? Can you pump as much as you want? Can a private company pump groundwater from one city and pipe it to other communities? The answer could affect the entire Lone Star State.

You've seen the headlines, there are some things you need to keep in mind when it comes to Roundup.

There's a deadline looming for Kansas lawmakers. If a bill hasn't passed both chambers in some form, it won't survive the midweek deadline.

It's springtime on the High Plains, and in Texas that means it's wildflower season.