Cindee Talley

Regional Programming Director

As Regional Programming Director, Cindee develops and produces HPPR’s regional information and feature programming, including working closely with volunteer individuals and organizations from across the region with knowledge, experience and perspectives to share.

Cindee is a native of Western Nebraska and a graduate of the University of South Dakota who followed her love of public radio and passion for rural life to High Plains Public Radio.  She joined HPPR in August, 2010, assuming the role of Regional Programming Director.  Simply put, she strives to provide listeners a sense of the High Plains- in all its dimensions of environment, history, enterprise, and culture that stretch beyond geography.  

Location:Garden City, KS studios

Phone: (800) 678-7444 or (620) 275-7444

Ways To Connect

Gov. Sam Brownback’s 50-year water plan is moving forward.  A statewide conservation panel is being selected.  The panel will investigate solutions for Kansas as a whole, while regional teams will look for local answers.

Hays is a success Brownback hopes to duplicate across the state reports the Kansas Health Institute.  The north central community’s wells went dry in 1991.  A comprehensive water-saving plan was developed.  Fewer, more efficient wells were dug.  Incentives for low-flow toilets, shower heads, high efficiency washing machine were provided by the city.  New construction codes changed to include water conservation mandates.  City leaders went into schools education the kids about water conservation.  Now the community of 21,000 people uses about the same amount of water it did in 1970 when the population was about 15,000.

texaschllicense.com

In Texas this session will be unremarkable.  All the new people at the top will get along, and those wringing their hands about change are manufacturing drama reports the Texas Tribune.

Of course, there is the other side where the mix of new personalities, the split in the Republican party, and a Legislature easily stampeded by noisy outside partisans will provide drama to keep the worriers busy.

Stephen Koranda / kansaspublicradio.org

Governor Sam Brownback highlighted what he calls a “crisis of the family” during his inauguration speech Monday reports Stephen Koranda for Kansas Public Radio.  

The governor was sworn in to office for a second term, he said building stronger families will be one of his main goals. Brownback says stronger families will lead to more economic growth and less poverty in Kansas.

oklegislature.gov

The Oklahoma Legislature has over 230 bills to consider at this point.  The proposed legislation ranges from a prohibiting agency heads from making new hires to the screening of emergency patients for transport reports KGOU.

Some of the other draft bills include: allowing victims of domestic violence to bring evidence from relevant cases; eliminating four government agencies; preventing family members or caregivers convicted of neglect, abuse, exploitation, or other crimes against the elderly or disabled from inheriting any portion of the victim’s estate; banning texting while driving; allowing multi-religious symbols in school for winter celebrations, and allowing legislators to carry firearms after completing a CLEET course.

cdc.gov

Already, flu and pneumonia have been a factor in more than 500 deaths in Kansas reports KPR’s Bryan Thompson.

 People older than 64 or younger than five are being hit the hardest. The CDC is advising people with chronic conditions, pregnant women, senior citizens, and small children to take antiviral drugs, such as Tamiflu, if they become infected. Dr. Mike Munger, at St. Luke’s South Primary Care, in Overland Park, says the drugs need to be taken within 48 hours of the first symptoms to minimize the severity of the flu.

When it comes to who wants to be the next president, all roads seem to lead to … Texas.

There are about two dozen serious contenders for the office.  And, an uncanny number have a legitimate Texas connection reports the Texas Tribune

Some have been in the Lone Star State for just a few months, often on a campaign job.   Others were born there.  Still others were educated or lived there for a job.

extension.purdue.edu

There is disparity when comparing broadband access in urban and rural America.  The gap gets even bigger when it comes to access on the farm reports Choices Magazine.

Data suggests 100 percent of urban residents have access to at least one broadband provider… compared to 78 percent of rural residents.

Take it a step further.  On the farm 70 percent of farms in 2012 had internet access, but it’s the level of service that varies.  Seven percent of farmers use dial-up, 13 percent satellite, and 13 percent mobile broadband.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

State finance official in Oklahoma are worried about the plummeting price of crude.  State ImpactOklahoma reports they are projecting budget cuts and potential job losses.

In the oil field, some energy companies are slashing spending while others try to weather what they hope will be a short downturn.

Gov. Mary Fallin met with top officials in December to certify tax revenues for state budget planning.  Estimates now show a revenue loss of about $300 million.  If oil prices stay low, state agencies could face steep cuts.

farmingthedream.com

Organic farming may be just as healthy for the farmers who practices it as it is to their consumers reports the Center for Rural Affairs.

Researchers at the National Institute of Health recently completed a 20 year study on the connection between pesticides and depression in farmers.

The Big Fat Surprise

Jan 7, 2015
wsj.com

The American Heart Association warns us eating foods containing saturated fats raises your cholesterol level… which in turn increases your risk of heart disease.  But, what if they’re wrong?

Nina Teicholz makes a compelling argument in her new book The Big Fat Surprise.  She questions if saturated fat is truly to blame reports the Economist

Her case is the vilification doesn’t hold up to close scrutiny.  She pokes holes in famous pieces of research pointing out the methodological problems and overlooked results.

kansasleadershipcenter.org

Americans, especially those in largely rural states, have little confidence in their neighbors, elected officials, media outlets, and schools reports Emily Badger for the Washington Post.

When it comes to public schools, Nebraska has the most confidence.  40 percent of Kansans have a great deal of confidence in the education system.

Residents of Mississippi talk about politics with their friends the most.  In the listening region, Colorado takes the top spot.

iraqenergy.org

The price of a barrel of oil is in a free fall according to KUT News.  The U.S. oil benchmark West Texas Intermediate fell below $50 early this week... matching levels of spring 2009.

The drop is linked to OPEC’s boosted production and a stronger dollar. 

OPEC member nations production increases are an effort to protect their market share and undercut American profits.  Both Iraq and Russia are producing crude at record levels.

The dollar’s increased value is at a nine year high against the euro.  Reasons for that gain are renewed instability in Greece and the possibility that the European Central Bank could introduce quantitative easing to stimulate the eurozone.

poandpo.com

The Chevron plant in Borger, Texas is under new ownership reports the Amarillo Globe News

Chevron Phillips Chemical and international giant, Solvay, announced this week they have completed a $220 million deal including Chevron’s Ryton plant.

The Ryton plant makes a component of plastics from chemicals found in natural gas.  Most employees of the facility will transfer to Solvay says a company spokeswoman.

tokeofthetown.com

The number of Colorado children treated for accidental pot consumption has doubled.  The Global Post reports numbers have reached the double digits. 

Arapahoe House Denver-area facilities have seen a 66 percent increase in the number of teens being treated for cannabis abuse.

Kevin Sabet is the president of Smart Approaches to Marijuana.  He says the brakes need to be put on the marijuana industry. 

Stephen Koranda / kansaspublicradio.org

Governor Sam Brownback and some legislators have been saying Kansas should rewrite the funding formula used to distribute state tax dollars to K-12 schools. A court ruled last week that the state is underfunding Kansas schools. As Kansas Public Radio’s Stephen Koranda reports the decision may add more energy to the call to rewrite the school finance formula.

In a previous ruling, the Kansas Supreme Court said the state’s finance system should be judged by determining if the spending levels achieve certain student outcomes.

University of Kansas constitutional law professor Richard E. Levy says if lawmakers decide to tackle the formula, that’s the angle they’ll probably need to take.

Helen H. Richardson / denverpost.com

Farmers are getting older.  At one time, the physical challenges driving them from the farm are now being overcome with the help of a program called the AgrAbility Project reports the Denver Post.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s 22-state program helps older, disabled farmers stay on the job as long as possible. 

538 individuals have been helped in Colorado where the program is a joint effort of Goodwill Industries of Denver and Colorado State University. 

Quentin Hope

A report on water use for fracking in Texas finds that it is not the only or even the most significant contributor to the longstanding problem of water use in Texas. 

The policy brief by The Mosbacher Institute for Trade, Economics and Public Policy at Texas A&M University is based on a study that looks closely at water use in the Eagle Ford Shale formation in south Texas where fresh groundwater aquifers are overdrawn by nearly 2.5 times their recharge rate.  Hydraulic fracturing operations there make up the third largest use of groundwater, well behind irrigation, the primary use.  However, hydraulic fracturing does requires large amounts of water, roughly five million gallons, for each well.

Kevin Rolle flickr/creative commons

The Kansas Biological Survey at KU has been awarded a $2.1 million contract to play an essential role in the Lesser Prairie Chicken Range-Wide Conservation Plan, a program resulting from the bird being listed as an endangered species in May of last year.  Companies that enroll in the plan, pay mitigation fees and follow recommended conservation measures are exempted from provisions of the Endangered Species Act and protected from penalties.

Nu-Life Market

Grain sorghum has long been a step-child crop to wheat and corn on the High Plains, used mainly as a secondary cattle feed and ethanol distilling grain.  But its status may be improving with the growing gluten-free food movement, for which sorghum is ideally suited.

However, capturing this food-grade, certified food market is no easy task.  That’s evident in the sophisticated business and production model developed by Nu-Life Market, a “farm-to-fork” enterprise operating in Scott County, Kansas. 

http://cominghometomyself.blogspot.com/

Greyhound is celebrating 100 years, and the BBC’s Laura Barton traveled from Michigan to rural Kansas trying to understand the lure of bus travel reports the Guardian. 

nytimes.com

There are three times as many men officially unemployed now as there were in 1968 reports the New York Times.

Men in their prime working age from 25 to 64 were studied.   

Percentage of unemployed males in area counties:

Pegasus Books

Richard Parker’s newest book, Lone Star Nation, is described as a provocative and eye-opening look at the most explosive and controversial state in America, where everything is bigger, bolder—and shaping our nation’s future in surprising ways by Amazon.

Karen Olsson reviewed the book for the New York Times

She says:

Parker’s short book caters to lighter appetites: It’s a tray of Texas nibbles. Included are a capsule history of the state; personal reminiscence and travels; policy analysis; a look at the 2014 governor’s race; and man-on-the-street (or woman-in-the-Starbucks) interviews, not to mention a list of 300 famous Texans and three pages of Texas-related quotations.

Dave Ranney / Kansas Health Institute

Advocates for Kansans with disabilities and frail seniors say they will file objections to proposed KanCare waiver changes reports the Kansas Health Institute

The waivers define the state’s approach to Medicaid funded services that help them live in the community rather than in nursing homes.

America's Health Rankings 2014 cover / kpr.org

New health rankings show Kansas stuck at 27 – the same slot that it occupied last year. But Kansas Public Radios’s Bryan Thompson reports there was a time – not that long ago – when the state ranked much higher than the middle of the pack.

     

New York Times

During Gov. Sam Brownback’s bid for re-election he assured Kansans he would balance the budget and preserve services by making government more efficient and cutting expenditures.  But, now there could be a rollback of the tax cuts that have been Brownback’s hallmark reports the New York Times.

Bob Daemmrich / texastribune.org

The biggest fight to pass open-carry legislation in Texas could be advocates of the Second Amendment.  The Texas Tribune reports conflict is emerging over how big changes to the current state law should be.

Larry Dreiling / hpj.com

Some things are easily taken for granted— running down to the grocery store when you’re out of milk.  That’s now true in Morland, Kansas.  After an eight year absence, the town of 150 now has a grocery store.  Morland isn’t an isolated case.  There are about 200 little stores in the state in communities with populations under 2,000.  There are also, places like Morland that no longer have grocery retailers.

amarillo.com/

Half a century ago, Tony and Claudia Price were two 18 year old kids on their honeymoon in Oklahoma City.  The Texas pair returned home with priceless story that went viral—the old fashioned way according to the Amarillo Globe News

Alan Gomez / USA TODAY

Garden City is in national news.  A reporter from USA Today came to the southwestern Kansas community talking with residents about the impact President Obama’s immigration plan would have.  Some said it would allow undocumented immigrants live without the worry of being picked up by immigration officers.  Some worry there will be an exodus as they look for better jobs in other parts of the country. 

amarillo.com/

Veterans in the Texas Panhandle got the OK to build a state-of-the-art museum and education center.  Randall County commissioners voted to allow construction of the Texas Panhandle War Museum and Education Center according to the Amarillo Globe News.

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