Cindee Talley

Regional Programming Director

As Regional Programming Director, Cindee develops and produces HPPR’s regional information and feature programming, including working closely with volunteer individuals and organizations from across the region with knowledge, experience and perspectives to share.

Cindee is a native of Western Nebraska and a graduate of the University of South Dakota who followed her love of public radio and passion for rural life to High Plains Public Radio.  She joined HPPR in August, 2010, assuming the role of Regional Programming Director.  Simply put, she strives to provide listeners a sense of the High Plains- in all its dimensions of environment, history, enterprise, and culture that stretch beyond geography.  

Location:Garden City, KS studios

Phone: (800) 678-7444 or (620) 275-7444

Ways to Connect

Predictions that the drought is coming to an end in much of Kansas are getting skeptical responses from some weather officials reports the Wichita Eagle. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center indicates drought conditions will ease across the state disappearing in central Kansas and easing significantly in most of western Kansas. Janet Salazar is a hydrologist for the Wichita Branch of the National Weather Service. She says she doesn't know what’s driving the prediction. Larry Ruthi is the meteorologist in charge of the Dodge City branch of the weather service. He says he’s reluctant to declare the drought outlook is wrong. Jeff Hutton agrees if the present pattern continues the map is probably pretty close. The warning coordination meteorologist says even with near or above rainfall, the drought in southwest Kansas won’t be eliminated.

Texas lawmakers are considering a policy known as a “parent trigger” law. The goal of the legislation is to prompt parent involvement and quicken turnarounds at struggling schools reports the Texas Tribune. The bill allows parents of students at underperforming public schools to campaign for school changes. That includes hiring new staff, contracting with a charter school operator to take over management, or closing the school altogether.

The declining Ogallala aquifer is front and center in the state of Kansas.  But one south-central farmer wants to make it clear that water woes don’t grip the whole state reports Kansas Agland.

John Janssen is a farmer in Kinsley.  He’s also a board member of Big Bend Groundwater Management District No. 5.  He says not to throw the whole state in with the Ogallala. 

When you think of Bonnie and Clyde, does southwestern Kansas ever cross your mind? The couple actually lived in Hugoton for several months using the aliases of Blackie and Jewell Underwood reports Kathy Hanks for the Hutchinson News. The two came to town in an old Model A drawn to the area because of the flourishing gas industry. Hugoton was a mecca in a time when the rest of the country was in the depths of the Great Depression.

A bill easing restrictions on carrying a concealed gun is making headway in the Kansas Legislature. The proposal would allow most Kansans over the age of 21 to carry a concealed gun without a license. Currently, training and a permit are required.

Robert Moser headlines list of 150 Medicaid expansion proponents from business, medical and religious realms. The former cabinet secretary says providers need it, and the people of Kansas need it.

The Kansas Aqua-Not

Mar 17, 2015
Southwest Kansas Groundwater Management District No. 3

The $19 billion aqueduct to pump water uphill from northeastern Kansas to the water-short west has a bunch of negatives reports Tim Unruh for Kansas Agland.

Some of those discouraging issues are:

  • Indian tribes and neighboring states have voiced concern
  • The aqueduct would cost $1 billion a year to operate
  • The transport price tag of water would be over $450 a acre foot.  That’s hard to pencil out with current prices.
  • Pumping water uphill in an open ditch would result in significant loss to evaporation 

Climate patterns from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans have magnified the Texas drought, but that could be changing. A word of caution, the next drought could be worse.

The city of Denton put a bulls eye on the friction between local control and the oil and gas industry when the city banned hydraulic fracturing last fall, Now, lawmakers are weighing in, and it looks like local control is headed for a beating report Jim Malewitz for The Texas Tribune.

A special enrollment period for health insurance through the federal marketplace started Sunday. But, not everyone's eligible.

Three Kansans have died from an outbreak of listeriosis. The patients had been hospitalized for unrelated causes and the CDC says four of them consumed milkshakes made with a single-serving of Blue Bell Creameries' ice cream product called "Scoops."

Oklahoma lawmakers are considering online registration to increase voter turnout.

Widespread agreement, no action yet on increasing overpumping penalties in Kansas.

When it comes to the decline in oil prices, over 40 percent of Texans say it will impact businesses positively in their region. However, more than 50 percent say the fall is bad for the state's economy.

A bill that barely passed last fall in Missouri is one step closer to November 2016 ballots. The bill is to amend Oklahoma's state Constitution.

The abortion procedure where instruments are used to grab and remove a fetus in pieces advanced from a Kansas House committee. The full Kansas House will now consider the bill.

Jay Ricci /

Have you noticed the two cement towers a few miles east of Amarillo and ever wondered… what in the world? 

The pair are remaining sentinels of the Amarillo Air Force Base writes Jay Ricci for the Amarillo Globe News. 

The military men and women and most of the buildings are gone.  What remains are rusted-out pieces of metal, sidewalks leading nowhere, lonely street signs at intersections with no traffic, and the two rusty water towers.

Texas State lawmakers are hearing testimony this week on a controversial bill aimed at limiting the type of ordinances and rules that city councils can pass.

Attendees might have come to the 13th annual High Plains Snow Goose Festival expecting good food, music, and a chance to see thousands of migrating Canadian and Snow geese, but this year they got even more: a dust storm complete with tumbleweeds; snow cancellations; encounters with elk, road runners, big horn sheep; and petroglyphs in Picture and Carrizo Canyons.

Imagine eHarmony for agricultural employers and workers. That’s how western Kansas farmer Mark Pettijohn describes Nebraska-based Hansen-Agri-placement.

No one really knows why the High Plains are so high in elevation, but researchers at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado are proposing a new explanation.

Discussion was limited to four questions decided prior to the second regional water planning meeting in WaKeeney. Halting water declines at their current levels led one table’s discuss to the conclusion of “no irrigation and more education.” Water quality and nutrients steered to criticism of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the division of Water Resources for proposed regulations. Another group discussion asked the question, “How do you get people from broadly different backgrounds to come together, sit down, and discuss solutions?”

For the first time in more than a decade enrollment in the federal food stamp program fell in Colorado reports Colorado Public Radio.  The rate dropped to 8.6 percent in 2013 according to data released from the U.S. Census Bureau.  The previous year close to 10 percent of Coloradoans received food stamps.

Colorado enrollment rates increased sharply during the recession. 

Only 3.3 percent were enrolled in 2000.  

John Hanna / The Topeka Capital-Journal

When it comes to Kansas universities and the budget, there are winners and there are losers.  This report from The Topeka Capital-Journal.  A Senate subcommittee took $9.4 million from the budget of the University of Kansas main campus in Lawrence, and gave $7.4 million of it to the KUMC expansion program in Sedgwick County.  $2 million must be diverted to medical student scholarships.

Three legislative bills before the Nebraska Unicameral are being called "a corporate assault on family farmers and rural communities." They lift the ban on packer ownership for hogs, replace county zoning of livestock facilities with a statewide matrix, and provide infrastructure grants to "livestock friendly" counties to facilitate large-scale livestock development.

Quail were once plentiful in Texas. But, according to Texas Parks and Wildlife officials the population has fallen over 60 percent in the last 30 years, and it continues to crash reports Texas Public Radio. A group of ranchers are working to restore habitat and bring back native birds.

Despite long-held suspicions that Oklahoma’s earthquake surge was linked to oil and gas activity, the Oklahoma Geological Survey stay silent amid pressure from oil company executives. State Seismologist Austin Holland admits “intense personal interest” from energy company executives, but says it never affected his scientific findings.

Agriculture seems to be under attack by the Kansas legislature reports Amy Bickel for Hutch News. Bickel says in the last two weeks two ag taxation bills could generate more than $900 million combined. That could mean a big difference in the budget gap. But, it would increase agriculture land values by an average of 473 percent.

The Kansas Farm Bureau with support from the Kansas Corn Growers Association is working to put a price tag on saving the prairie chicken. Their message is economic disaster. Jim Sipes is a farmer in Stanton County. There’s been a large reduction in the amount of intent to drill permits that began prior to the drop in oil prices. Sipes says the decrease is largely due to the $46,000 to $83,000 mitigation fee per drilled well companies have to pay for disrupting the bird’s habitat. He says it’s even worse for the wind industry. Three projects have been stopped, and the mitigation fee for each wind tow is $400,000 to $1 million depending on the value of the habitat. There’s also a fee for transmission lines which is roughly $870,000 a mile. These costs are associated with the species having the threatened tag. If the chicken is listed as endangered, it will change everything.

During annual inventory, it was discovered that 1.121 steer calves were missing from the Braums 24,000 acre facility in the Texas Panhandle.