Cindee Talley

Regional Programming Director

As Regional Programming Director, Cindee develops and produces HPPR’s regional information and feature programming, including working closely with volunteer individuals and organizations from across the region with knowledge, experience and perspectives to share.

Cindee is a native of Western Nebraska and a graduate of the University of South Dakota who followed her love of public radio and passion for rural life to High Plains Public Radio.  She joined HPPR in August, 2010, assuming the role of Regional Programming Director.  Simply put, she strives to provide listeners a sense of the High Plains- in all its dimensions of environment, history, enterprise, and culture that stretch beyond geography.  

Location:Garden City, KS studios

Phone: (800) 678-7444 or (620) 275-7444

Ways to Connect

Kansas has the highest rate of students starting at a two-year public institution and finishing with a degree from a four-year college or university. The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center's annual report lists only five states above 20 percent. They are: Kansas, Texas, Iowa, North Dakota, and Virginia.

A Texas state senator says, "when you fail to invest in your infrastructure, your infrastructure deteriorates." The Lone Star state is seeing that up close and personal.

Jeff Bell

When our land is not covered with a brief blanket of white, “this is the time of the year when the grass is a dormant shade of brown and trees are denuded of leaves,” says Jeff Bell. 

Bell is a travel blogger.  His website is called Planet Bell

He usually leaves his camera in the case when he goes home to western Oklahoma.  But, this year he made an effort to get out and take photos, trying to see the land in a new light. 

The results are stunning.

Right-to-farm has made its way to the Sooner State.  It’s a topic that puts agriculture at odds with environmentalists and animal rights advocates reports StateImpact Oklahoma.

The right-to-farm amendment recently passed by a narrow margin in Missouri. 

Now there’s a similar bill in Oklahoma.  Rep. Scott Biggs is sponsoring the measure.  He’s a Republican from Chickasha. 

If it passes it will add this to the state constitution:

There is an upside to lower oil prices. StateImpact Texas takes a look at consumer trends. Lower prices at the pump might mean more tourists for gems like Palo Duro Canyon.

Twice as many Kansas children would be in poverty without government aid reports the Topeka Capital-Journal.  Data just released from Kids Count shows government programs have kept over 100,000 Kansas kids out of poverty the past few years.

The Kansas child poverty rate would double to 30 percent without assistance.

The data measures the time period of 2011 to 2013.

More of the story, including reactions to the data from Shannon Cotsoradis, president of  Kansas Action for Children is available from the Topeka Capital-Journal. 

The latest poll from the University of Texas and Texas Tribune shows the federal government isn't winning any popularity contest with Texans.

Kansas said Nebraska used more than its fair share of water out of the Republican River in 2005 and 2006. The Supreme Court agreed, and ordered Nebraska to pay up.

According to a recent survey, Kansas is the only state with an increased number of uninsured.

Josh Davis /

Sometimes you’ve got to leave home… to see home.  That’s how Rolling Stone says it was for Ryan Culwell. 

Rolling Stone’s Andrew Leahey writes:

According to the Kansas Insurance Department, members of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas and other Blue organizations were also affected by the security breach.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera /

Retired Texas state district Judge John Dietz made his first public appearance this weekend.

Deitz spoke at the Association of Texas Professional Educators in Austin.

He says a solution to the state’s unequal and ineffective public education system should come from the Legislature. This report from the Texas Tribune.

He says, "We are dooming a generation of these children by providing an insufficient education, and we can do better."

Dr. Mark Peterson is chair of the political science department at Washburn University, but we may soon get in trouble for telling you this fact. Peterson is a guest commentator for Kansas Public Radio. He offers his thoughts on a bill before the legislature limiting free speech rights of university employees.

Sarah Goodfriend and Suzanne Bryant were married Thursday morning in Austin. The county clerk issued the couple a marriage license based on a court order. Theirs is Texas' first same-sex marriage. The order, the county clerk's office confirms, will only apply to this one couple, one of whom is "medically fragile."

Texas State Senator Kel Seliger is working to fast-track a bill giving school officials the option to graduate high school students who have failed state exams.  This report from the Texas Tribune.

Seliger says students who are doing well in school shouldn’t be kept from getting a high school diploma because of a standardized test.

U.S. Senator Pat Roberts met privately with more than a dozen industry groups recently. He says over-regulation is a common theme regardless of the organization. He also said reducing trade barriers and improving federal assistance for ag research are priorities.

The Department of Agriculture has improved the federal Conservation Stewardship Program, offering $100 million to landowners taking steps to conserve soil and natural resources.  But, they’re doing a poor job of telling farmers about it reports Bruce Knight for Agri-Pulse.

Knight says high profile initiatives like providing habitat for the lesser prairie chicken or conserving the Ogallala Aquifer are getting all the attention because of political priorities.  He says what excites him are the enhancements embracing modern precision agriculture technology, soil health, cover crops and fertilizer management.


Agriculture drinks up 80 percent of the freshwater in America every year.  Every five years the U.S. Department of Agriculture reports just how much that is, for what crops, and at what cost reports the National Geographic.

The latest survey shows corn is still king, using 14 percent more irrigation than the last report.

The most common jobs are changing.  Across the high plains, truck drivers dominate. 

Why?  NPR reports there are a few reasons:

The Holdouts

Feb 16, 2015

Three families who took a pass on the fracking boom-- and what it cost them.

Colorado veterinarians are warning pet owners that the number of dogs accidentally eating pot products is on the rise reports Vermont Public Radio.

Apryl Steele is the past president of the Colorado Veterinary Medical Association.  She says since pot became legal in Colorado, they’ve seen a four-fold increase in the number of dogs treated for accidentally ingesting it.  Steele says THC is much more toxic to dogs who don’t understand the concept of eating just a little.

There’s bill being heard by the Kansas Senate Judiciary Committee today that creates a higher tier of foster care reports the Wichita Eagle

This level pays at a substantially higher rate and families in the program would be eligible for state education aid to either home school or send their foster kids to private school.

The bill is introduced by Sen. Forrest Knox, R-Altoona.  He says he wants to provide stability for children.

To be eligible for this program, a husband and wife have to be married for at least seven years, one cannot work outside the home.  They must keep their home free of liquor and tobacco, and refrain from extramarital sex.   

Sales at farmers markets are slowing dramatically, but that's not necessarily bad news for farmers.

Liberty Theater (Amarillo Downtown, Inc.) /

The Liberty Theater could be getting a chance at a second life reports Channel Four News in Amarillo. 

The historic theater was built in 1921.  It was the only place African-Americans were welcome.

It’s been vacant for years, but a group of people are working to redevelop the building into a place for artists to perform.

Hundreds of corn farmers across the state of Kansas attended Corn School this year reports Seedbuzz.  If you wonder what producers learn at corn school, here are some lessons they took away:

  • You have to soil test.  David Mengel is a soil fertility specialist at KSU.  He shared this quote from North Dakota counterparts, "Producers would not dare go to the field without checking the oil in their tractor engine. One should approach soil testing in the same manner."

2016 is the centennial year of the National Park Service.  President Obama’s budget request for the coming year includes $3 billion for the bureau’s critical conservation, preservation, and recreation mission reports the Lamar Ledger.  That’s a boost of almost $433 million.

The national parks in southeastern Colorado plan on using the increase to add seasonal park rangers, deliver more educational programs, and address maintenance backlogs.

Alexa Roberts is the superintendent of Bent’s Old Fort and Sand Creek Massacre National Historic sites.  She says the President’s budget highlights the importance of investing in a historic effort to attract and host more visitors.  It also helps leverage additional private philanthropy for the parks.

Kansas is at the bottom of the barrel when it comes to kids taking advantage of the Summer Food Service Program.  Only 7 percent of eligible children participate.  That’s the lowest in the nation reports the Hays Daily News.

One reason for dismal participation rates in a state where one out of every four children live in poverty could be the lack of serving sites. 

The Kansas State Department of Education reports there are 40 counties statewide with no serving site.  The only counties in northwest Kansas with summer programs are Ellis, Russell, and Smith counties.

Fans of the Pulitzer Prize winning “To Kill a Mockingbird” know Harper Lee is planning to release an unexpected sequel to the famous story later this year.  But, you may not know the private author has ties to the Sunflower State reports KSN.

Before she was internationally recognized for “To Kill a Mockingbird”, Harper Lee spent some time in Garden City working on another famous book.

Laurie Oshel is the assistant director of Finney County Historical Society.  She says, “Lee came to Garden City in late 1959, early 1960 with Truman Capote.”

Hundreds of people in Amarillo are now receiving health care who normally would not be able to afford it reports Madison Alewel for NewsChannel 10.

Heal the City is a free clinic in the San Jacinto neighborhood.  It’s open every Monday evening from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

The clinic is the brainchild of Dr. Alan Keister. After making several medical missions to Central America, Keister knew there was a mission to complete right here in Amarillo.