Cindee Talley

Regional Programming Director

As Regional Programming Director, Cindee develops and produces HPPR’s regional information and feature programming, including working closely with volunteer individuals and organizations from across the region with knowledge, experience and perspectives to share.

Cindee is a native of Western Nebraska and a graduate of the University of South Dakota who followed her love of public radio and passion for rural life to High Plains Public Radio.  She joined HPPR in August, 2010, assuming the role of Regional Programming Director.  Simply put, she strives to provide listeners a sense of the High Plains- in all its dimensions of environment, history, enterprise, and culture that stretch beyond geography.  

Location:Garden City, KS studios

Phone: (800) 678-7444 or (620) 275-7444

Ways To Connect

The Journal Record / http://journalrecord.com/

An oil industry geologist wants to shift the finger pointing away from the oil industry as the cause of the earthquakes in Oklahoma.  At a recent conference sponsored by the Oklahoma City Geological Society, Glen Brown, vice president of geology at Continental Resources, Inc. says the “tectonic plates are more likely to blame for the tremors in Oklahoma,” according to a recent article from the Journal Record.

When heading out to vote in the primary election today, KSN News has put together a guide to help you make the best choice.

timesdispatch.com

Dr. Mirta M. Martin is a living testament to the American dream.  Martin was born in Cuba.  As a young girl, she escaped the Castro regime, fleeing with her grandmother and sister to Spain, and then to the United States and Florida according to a recent article from the High Plains Journal.

usgs.org

This is the last installment of the water series.  Amy Bickel covered facts about the Ogallala Aquifer in a story published by Kansas Agland.

Kirsten Leong

Carlene Tanigoshi Tinker was a little girl when she was an internee at Camp Amache, outside Granada, Colorado.  She resided there with her family from 1942 to 1944.  

She’s returning to Amache to volunteer at Denver University's field school.

She’s not standing by, watching the action, she’s in the midst of it, digging, brushing, and screening. 

The excavation reveals something.  The crew believes they have found a Japanese style bathtub called a furo.

Tinker explains a furo. 

newportacademy.com

A new report from the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services says Kansans on Medicare will save more than $10 million this year on prescription drugs, thanks to one of the lesser-known provisions of the Affordable Care Act reported Bryan Thompson for Kansas Public Radio

k-state.edu

One thing that mixes into the Kansas water debate is where you live.  I have a neighbor from eastern Kansas who works hard to get things that grow wild in pastures of her childhood home to simply survive in her western Kansas flower bed. 

http://aqha.com/

The whole family had the opportunity to get a taste of cowboy life at the National Day of the Cowboy the past weekend.   About 1,200 people braved the heat to attend the free event at the American Quarter Horse Association Headquarters according to the AQHA.

What is seen to some as hocus-pocus, helps farmers and ranchers find water in Logan.

Tim Unruh / Salina Journal

Even though it’s 2014, for Jerry and Diane McReynolds they live like it’s the 1800s.  The McReynolds’ domestic well in Rooks County, Kansas, went dry in October 2013.   The couple are members of Rural Water District No. 3, but service is not reliable, especially during the day reported Tim Unruh for the Salina Journal.

The Texas Panhandle bids farewell to a quiet man, Henry Carroll LaMaster. A quiet man, who came from a pioneering family of humble service and education that did two things no other family in the Panhandle accomplished.

knrc.ws

Everyone knew the open, treeless High Plains wasn’t a place to put down roots.  Making a home, farming, and development takes water, and in Western Kansas it’s arid and rainfall is in short supply.  Enter the grand idea of irrigation.

nasa.gov

The ag world is gearing up to feed 9 billion people, but the Ogallala Aquifer sprawling under the surface of eight Midwestern states is going down the drain.  In fact, in some places, it’s gone reported Amy Bickel for Kansas Agland.

newschannel10.com

“The Last of the Big Dogs” has been dismantled, and now sits in the Freedom Museum in Pampa, Texas.  Disassembly workers at Pantex dubbed the B53 uranium bomb.  It’s a megaton-class, weighed about 10,000 pounds and is about the size of a minivan according to a recent article from the Amarillo Globe-News.

alexmandossian.com

One of the lesser-known parts of the Affordable Care Act is about to put some money back into the pockets of nearly 60,000 Kansas families.  The refunds will total $3.6 million reported Bryan Thompson for Kansas Public Radio.

pewtrusts.org

The Kansas economy relies on water and for more than a generation, experts have warned that western Kansas' economic resource is vanishing.

womenforkansas.org/

  Two ladies, one light, one dark, are traveling across Kansas this week talking about a grassroots movement called, “Women for Kansas.” 

The Kansas economy relies on water and for more than a generation, experts have warned that western Kansas' economic resource is vanishing. The Hutchinson News and the Salina Journal are delving into the issues surrounding the declining Ogallala Aquifer and how it affects Kansas. Water: Past, present, and future begins today with a look at a water-centered economy.

amarillo.com

If you’re traveling Route 66, you might see a caravan of Cadillacs getting their kicks traveling the open road.  They’ve traveled all the way from China for the experience according to a recent article in the Amarillo Globe-News.

winterlivestock.com

Many Colorado cattle ranchers are beginning to recover from the drought, but for many the rain is too little and too late.

lamarledger.com

Recent torrential rains brought flash flooding to low-lying portions of Lamar and southeastern Colorado.  Heavy rains and strong winds closed Highway 50 in low areas.  Several railroad underpasses were closed until waters receded reported Russ Baldwin for the Prowers Journal.

wtamu.edu

The WT graduating class of 2012 entered the job market with better prospects and significantly less student loan debt.  The Amarillo Globe-News reported the average WT grad had student loan debt of $19,774 compared to the national average of $29,400.

cjonline.com

Former Senate President Steve Morris is one of 104 Kansas Republicans backing Paul Davis in his bid to be governor according to a recent article in the Garden City Telegram

After the blessing of a majority of stock holders, Hastings Entertainment now belongs to Joel Weinshanker.

lubbockonline.com

Plains Cotton Growers support the High Plains Underground Water Conservation District’s proposal to limit groundwater use on private farmland in Texas.  

2014 National Climate Assessment

Texans voted overwhelmingly to fund new water infrastructure projects last November.  State water planners are preparing for a more populous Texas, but not a hotter one reported Neena Satija for The Texas Tribune.

city-data.com

Although 25 percent of Americans live in rural areas, only 10 percent of doctors do.  Finding physicians willing to live on the prairie is a serious problem in Kansas.  Kearny County Hospital had that problem.  The small hospital is rural, very rural with five people per square mile, but the little hospital has found a solution according to a recent article by the Kansas Health Institute.

dailynebraskan.com

Once upon a time there was a myth that motivated pioneers to go west and settle the Great Plains.  Told that rain would follow the plow that they were “changing climate for the better”, these hardy souls broke up vast seas of sod working to make their farming Eden a reality. 

kwo.org

The water plan for the state of Kansas was recently unveiled.  The goal is to ensure a reliable water supply for the future according to a recent article from the Washington Times.

More rain could turn things around for farmers, but if the weather turns hot and dry, it could be a repeat of last year.

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