Nadya Faulx

Nadya joined KMUW in May 2015 (which will sound more impressive when it’s not June 2015) after a year at a newspaper in western North Dakota, where she did not pick up an accent.

Before entering the wild world of journalism, she studied international relations, worked at a dog daycare and taught English at a school in the Republic of Georgia (not all at the same time). KMUW marks her triumphant return to public media; she previously interned with the diversity department at the NPR mothership in Washington, D.C.

She enjoys traveling, reading, making jewelry that could easily be mistaken for the work of a 4-year-old, and hanging out with her cat, Dragon.

The deadline to sign up for health insurance in the Affordable Care Act marketplace is less than three weeks away, on Dec. 15—several weeks earlier than last year’s deadline. It's not the only change in the marketplace.

Demonstrators held a protest in Wichita on Saturday against a proposal to bring a Tyson poultry complex to Sedgwick County.

Traditionally, most university Spanish degrees have focused on literature and culture. One college in Wichita has changed its Spanish language program to meet a growing demand for interpreters and translators.

When Jerry Smartt was studying for her four Spanish degrees, the focus was on literature and culture.

"I have an entire wall in my office that is nothing but my best friends, which are my books," she says.

Six children were recovered, and one suspect was arrested in Kansas during a nationwide sex trafficking sting that took place earlier this month.

A U.S. Senate committee passed a bill Wednesday to reauthorize funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP. Federal funds were only approved through the end of September, putting 37,000 Kansas kids at risk of losing coverage if the program isn’t renewed.

Business leaders and members of Kansas’ congressional delegation are supportive of renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA.

Speaking at a summit hosted by the Kansas Chamber of Commerce in Wichita Friday, District 4 Rep. Ron Estes said he wants to modernize NAFTA in a way that keeps the “good parts” of the trade agreement with Canada and Mexico.

Estes said Trump’s statements have begun to focus more on free and fair trade, instead of tearing up agreements.

Kansas is one of several states experiencing an outbreak of bacterial infections linked to puppies sold at Petland stores. So far, five cases in Kansas have been reported.

The results of the state's latest ACT test shows the number of Kansas students who are college-ready is on the decline.

In reaction to the announcement that President Trump is rescinding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, DACA recipients and immigration activists in Wichita are now calling on Congress to pass permanent legislation to protect young adults brought to the U.S. as kids.

Westar Energy on Tuesday celebrated the completion of its new training site in Wichita where high school and technical school students can explore careers in the electrical industry.

Pratt Community College students showed off their climbing skills, going up and down practice electrical poles with special boots equipped with steel shanks.

Kansas Democratic House Leader Jim Ward is finally jumping into the race for governor.

Hundreds of independent oil and gas explorers and producers are in Wichita this week for their annual convention.

This year marks the 80th annual meeting of the Kansas Independent Oil and Gas Association. The group, which formed in 1937, says independent producers are responsible for 93 percent of oil and 63 percent of natural gas produced in Kansas.

The Kansas branch of the American Civil Liberties Union is seeking information about communication between state attorney general Derek Schmidt and the federal government over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

Kansas lawmakers in both parties are calling for higher pay for the state’s corrections officers after several recent incidents at the El Dorado Correctional Facility.

Starting Saturday, the fine for not wearing a seat belt in Kansas will triple.

Kansas’ current seat belt fine -- $10 -- is one of the lowest in the country. State legislators passed a law this session raising the fine to $30.

Republican U.S. Senator Jerry Moran visited Wichita Friday to bring attention to what he calls a “damaging” proposal to privatize air traffic control operations.