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StoryCorps
10:04 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Once Forbidden, Books Become A Lifeline For A Young Migrant Worker

On a visit to StoryCorps, Storm Reyes told her son, Jeremy Hagquist, about growing up as a farm laborer. Reyes eventually went to night school and worked in a library for more than 30 years.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 8:33 am

In the late 1950s, when she was just 8 years old, Storm Reyes began picking fruit as a full-time farm laborer for less than $1 per hour. Storm and her family moved often, living in Native American migrant worker camps without electricity or running water.

With all that moving around, she wasn't allowed to have books growing up, Storm tells her son, Jeremy Hagquist, on a visit to StoryCorps in Tacoma, Wash.

"Books are heavy, and when you're moving a lot you have to keep things just as minimal as possible," she says.

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Blue Note At 75
12:25 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Cause For Celebration: The Iconic Blue Note Records At 75

Drummer Art Blakey, who recorded for Blue Note from 1954 to 1965, in the studio.
Francis Wolff Blue Note Records

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 6:48 pm

Blue Note Records is the kind of record label that people like to call "storied" — so celebrated and impactful that no one narrative can capture its essence. From swing to bebop and hard bop, through fusion and the avant-garde, Blue Note has been telling the story of jazz in the grooves of its records since 1939 — and for its 75th anniversary, it's releasing remastered vinyl editions of some gems from its catalog. But the real legacy of the label is too big to capture on disc.

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The Salt
10:30 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Want Your Cheese To Age Gracefully? Cowgirl Creamery's Got Tips

Sue Conley (left) and Peggy Smith, co-founders of Cowgirl Creamery, prepare their chilled leek and asparagus soup with creme fraiche and fresh ricotta at Cowgirl Creamery in Point Reyes Station, Calif.
Tim Hussin for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:27 am

In the world of cheese, much like in the world of wine, the ultimate mark of success is acceptance by the French. That's exactly what happened to Sue Conley and Peggy Smith, co-founders of Cowgirl Creamery in northern California.

In 2010, when they were inducted into the prestigious Guilde des Fromagers, they were among the first wave of American cheesemakers to join its ranks.

Cowgirl Creamery also put out its first cookbook in late 2013.

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Digital Life
2:11 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

A Killer's Manifesto Reveals Wide Reach Of Misogyny Online

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 3:10 am

The misogynistic manifesto written by Elliot Rodger, the 22-year-old who police say killed six people before taking his own life Friday, quickly led to an outpouring on Twitter under the hashtag #YesAllWomen. Women and men alike used the hashtag to share stories and statistics about harassment and sexual assault.

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All Tech Considered
1:57 pm
Sun May 25, 2014

Going Dark: The Internet Behind The Internet

The Deep Web is a part of the Internet not accessible by standard Web browsers and search engines.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 10:17 am

The average computer user with an Internet connection has access to an amazing wealth of information. But there's also an entire world that's invisible to your standard Web browser.

These parts of the Internet are known as the Deep Web. The tools to get to there are just a few clicks away, and more and more people who want to browse the Web anonymously are signing on.

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Photography And Memory
12:18 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories

Rebecca Woolf takes a lot of photos of her children for her blog, Girl's Gone Child, but says she tries to not let the camera get in the middle of a moment.
Courtesy of Rebecca Woolf

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 7:58 am

Los Angeles blogger Rebecca Woolf uses her blog, Girl's Gone Child, as a window into her family's life. Naturally, it includes oodles of pictures of her four children.

She says she's probably taken tens of thousands of photos since her oldest child was born. And she remembers the moment when it suddenly clicked — if you will — that she was too absorbed in digital documentation.

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Found Recipes
11:54 am
Thu May 22, 2014

Freed From The Sidewalk Cart, This Sauerkraut Goes Global

Don't diss the sauerkraut: It may be a hot dog staple, but it's more versatile than you think.
Courtesy of Edward Lee

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 3:21 pm

Edward Lee thought he knew sauerkraut. The chef for the Louisville, Ky., restaurant 610 Magnolia, grew up in New York City, a place where sauerkraut means one thing: "sidewalk hot dog carts — cheap, bad, overboiled sauerkraut on top of awful kosher hot dogs," he says.

He loved it, as any native New Yorker might, but it was sauerkraut -- boring, safe, standard.

Many years later, after Lee moved to Kentucky, he had a sauerkraut surprise at his then-fiance's house. When she broke out a jar of her mother's homemade sauerkraut, he didn't expect too much.

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Politics
12:07 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

40 Years After Watergate, A Look Back At Nixon's Downfall

Washington Journal

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 8:43 am

Forty years ago, in mid-May 1974, Elizabeth Drew, the Washington correspondent for The New Yorker, wrote this in her journal: "Rumors went around the Capitol today that the President was resigning."

The Capitol, she observed was "noisy and edgy .. and in the hothouse atmosphere, the rumors burst into full bloom."

By August 1974 the president in question, Richard Nixon, would resign rather than face a Senate impeachment trial.

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Environment
10:20 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

For N.J. Mayor, The Time To Adapt To Rising Sea Levels Is Now

Hoboken, N.J., residents walk through flood water in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Mayor Dawn Zimmer is advocating for better planning and increased funding for flood-prone urban areas.
Charles Sykes AP

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 7:41 am

Last week, scientists warned that a massive chunk of the West Antarctica Ice Sheet will eventually drift into the sea and melt, raising sea levels at least 10 feet higher than previous predictions.

Even before the announcement, scientists at the nonprofit research organization Climate Central predicted that surging seas could put the homes of nearly 5 million Americans underwater by the end of this century.

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Music
12:09 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Heir To A Jazz Legacy, A Trumpeter Finds His Own Way

Theo Croker's new album, AfroPhysicist, comes out May 20.
Thomas Brodin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 5:20 am

Jazz composer and trumpeter Theo Croker opens his new album, AfroPhysicist, with an ode to his grandfather: New Orleans jazz great Doc Cheatham. The thing is, Croker didn't grow up in New Orleans or any other jazz hub. He's from Jacksonville, Fla., and he was just a child when his grandfather died in 1997. It wasn't until his grandfather's memorial services — attended by jazz legends — that he decided to join the legacy.

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Shots - Health News
12:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Filtering A New Idea: A Book That's Educational And 'Drinkable'

Contaminated water can spread diseases like cholera and typhoid. A new project aims to provide water filters in the form of an educational book.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 5:32 pm

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Politics
10:35 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Amid Complaints, Lawmakers Seek More Oversight For Border Agents

United States border patrol agents monitor a fence in Hidalgo, Texas. Two congressmen, from Texas and New Mexico, are seeking a review of some agency policies.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:07 am

U.S. Reps. Beto O'Rourke of Texas and Steve Pearce of New Mexico are looking for answers to their questions about the Border Patrol. These Southwest representatives, one Democrat and the other Republican, have neighboring districts along the U.S.-Mexico border.

They introduced legislation in March that calls for more oversight and accountability for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, or CBP.

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Wisdom Watch
7:37 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Oldest National Park Ranger Shares 'What Gets Remembered'

Betty Reid Soskin, 92, is the oldest active full-time National Park Service ranger in the United States. She and her colleagues at the Rosie the Riveter World War II Home Front National Historical Park are preparing to unveil new permanent exhibits at the park on May 24.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 9:26 am

As 92-year-old Betty Reid Soskin helped hash out plans for a new national park 13 years ago, this is what stuck in her mind: "What gets remembered is a function of who's in the room doing the remembering."

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Music
7:07 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Breaking Up Helped Ledisi Find 'The Truth' In Her Music

Ledisi performs at the 2013 BET Honors awards. The singer has been nominated for eight Grammy awards over the past 10 years.
Kris Connor Getty Images for BET

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 7:37 am

Singer songwriter Ledisi has had eight Grammy nominations, and says she is grateful for that. "I would like to win, but it will happen when its time."

For more than 10 years, Ledisi has garnered an international fan base while striving to grow her musical abilities.

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Television
10:03 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Bye-Bye To Barbara Walters: A Long 'View' Of A Storied Career

Walters credits ABC News head Roone Arledge with jump-starting her career by sending her on the road, to do interviews with people like Fidel Castro.
AP

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 5:55 am

Barbara Walters had a big interview recently: She spoke with V. Stiviano, the girlfriend of disgraced L.A. Clippers owner Donald Sterling.

"Are you in love with Donald Sterling?" Walters asks. "I love him," Stiviano answers. There's a little back-and-forth about the nature of their love, and in the end, Stiviano admits she's not in love with Sterling, but she does love him "like a father figure."

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The Salt
1:13 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

How Food Companies Court Nutrition Educators With Junk Food

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 9:41 am

When hundreds of California nutritionists and dietitians gathered for their annual conference in April, their Friday lunch was a bacon ranch salad, chocolate chip cookies and a pink yogurt parfait, all courtesy of McDonald's.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
8:54 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Debate: Is Death Final?

Sean Carroll (left) and Steven Novella argue that testimonies about near-death experiences are not evidence of an afterlife.
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 11:11 am

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

Is there some form of existence after death, or is the notion a product of wishful thinking about our own mortality?

These questions have fascinated humans for millennia. Many approach the concept of an afterlife as a religious one, but in a recent Intelligence Squared U.S. debate, a physicist and three medical doctors put faith aside to debate life after death from a scientific perspective.

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Economy
11:35 am
Mon May 12, 2014

For Geithner, Financial Crisis Was Like Landing A Burning Plane

Then-Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies before the House Financial Services Committee in 2012. He says he struggled with communicating why he had to help the banks during the financial crisis.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:27 pm

Timothy Geithner was president of the New York Federal Reserve when the Wall Street bank Lehman Brothers collapsed in 2008. A few months later, he became Treasury secretary as the crisis deepened on his watch.

Geithner received mixed reviews of his performance during that time. Wall Street types take him for a champion of excessive government intervention and regulation, while Occupy Wall Street types consider him a tool of the banks. Geithner, however, says he was just trying to get the financial system out of a multifaceted crisis with the threat of a Great Depression looming.

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Around the Nation
2:10 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Veterans' Success At Home: More Than Just Landing Any Job

Veterans leave the service with high-level skills, like combat medicine, but it's often not easy to turn those skills into credentials for a civilian job.
Brennan Linsley AP

The federal government has spent billions helping veterans get the training and education they need to re-enter the civilian workforce.

Despite the effort, the unemployment rate for vets remains higher than the national average. Aside from dealing with the psychological transition, veterans also have to navigate how to transfer their military skills into civilian ones.

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World
12:11 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Nowhere To Go,' Ugandan LGBT Activist Applies For Asylum In U.S.

At a news conference in Boston on May 6, Ugandan LGBT activist John Abdallah Wambere says he is seeking asylum in the U.S.
Josh Reynolds AP

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 1:31 pm

Citing an environment of fear, persecution and anti-gay violence in his home country of Uganda, John Abdallah Wambere has applied for asylum in the United States.

Wambere, 41, came to prominence for his work with Spectrum Uganda Initiatives, an organization that advocates for LGBT rights and provides health and education services.

He announced his decision to seek asylum at a news conference on May 6 in Boston. Wambere is currently living in Cambridge, Mass.

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Television
12:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Stand Up Planet' Follows Jokes To Serious Global Issues

As part of the documentary Stand Up Planet, South African comedian Mpho Popps (left) and Indian comedian Aditi Mittal (right) came to Los Angeles to perform with Hasan Minhaj at the Laugh Factory.
Courtesy of StandUpPlanet.org

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 4:45 am

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Music
12:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

In The Studio With Rodrigo Y Gabriela

Rodrigo Y Gabriela's latest album is 9 Dead Alive.
Tina Korhonen Courtesy of the artist

A pair of former heavy metal guitarists who left Mexico for Ireland, Rodrigo y Gabriela developed an acoustic sound that has taken the duo from playing on the streets for change to some of the biggest stages on the festival circuit. Rodrigo Sanchez and Gabriela Quintero joined NPR's Arun Rath in the studio at NPR West to perform a few selections from their latest album, 9 Dead Alive. Hear the music, and their conversation, at the audio link.

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Sports
1:40 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Athletes Chased By Technology In The Sport Of Anti-Doping

Lance Armstrong (left) and Tyler Hamilton compete in the 90th Tour de France in 2003. Hamilton later testified in the doping case brought against Armstrong and the U.S. Postal cycling team.
Franck Fife AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 2:59 pm

As the Giro d'Italia bicycle race sets off in Ireland this weekend, the shadow of doping will not be far behind. In a competition to beat the cheaters, scientists are constantly trying to improve drug testing.

While it can be hard for regulators to keep up with new habits, when an athlete is finally caught doping, the result can be revolutionary.

Performance-enhancing drugs have plagued the sport of cycling for years, with Lance Armstrong at the center of the scandal. But he was not alone.

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My Big Break
12:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Dolphins, Pirates And David Hasselhoff: Breaking Into TV At Sea

While translating for Japanese tourists on a boat in Hawaii, Leah Warshawski learned about the ocean, knowledge she later used in film production.
Courtesy of Leah Warshawski

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Director and producer Leah Warshawski's big break happened on the water.

It started when she was in college studying Japanese in Hawaii. Her dormmate worked on a boat and asked if Warshawksi wanted a job translating for Japanese tourists.

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Shots - Health News
11:53 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Telepsychiatry Brings Emergency Mental Health Care To Rural Areas

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 4:59 am

North Carolina is facing a very big mental health care challenge — 28 counties across the state do not have a single psychiatrist. That's despite the fact that in recent years, emergency rooms in the state have seen more patients with mental health, developmental disability or substance abuse problems.

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Environment
10:31 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Monterey Bay An 'Ocean Buffet Open For Business' This Spring

Three humpback whales surge upward, gulping the silvery anchovies that have been in abundance in Monterey Bay this spring.
Kate Spencer Fast Raft Nature Tours

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 5:34 am

Monterey Bay on California's central coast rests atop one of the largest underwater canyons in the world. It's deeper than the Grand Canyon, making it possible for lots of ocean life — including humpback whales, orcas, dolphins and sea lions — to be seen extremely close to shore. That is, given the right circumstances. Lately, the right circumstances have converged, and there's more marine and wildlife in the bay than anyone's seen in recent memory.

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Music
12:14 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Yeezy Or The Bard: Who's The Best Wordsmith In Hip-Hop?

Data scientist Matt Daniels charted the vocabularies of hip-hop artists against Shakespeare and Herman Melville.
Matt Daniels

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 7:16 am

William Shakespeare had a wildly extensive vocabulary. Of more than 800,000 total words in all of his works, almost 29,000 of them are unique.

Although impressive, there are a few rappers who give the Bard a run for his money. Data scientist Matt Daniels charted the vocabularies of hip-hop artists against Shakespeare and Herman Melville.

"This is not a serious academic study. This is an, like, 'I thought it'd be cool on the Internet [project],' " he says.

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All Tech Considered
10:01 am
Mon May 5, 2014

FAA Head: Safety, Privacy Concerns Abound In Regulating Drones

A water-collecting drone hovers at a testing site in Lincoln, Neb., in 2013. The Federal Aviation Administration is working on rules for the commercial use of unmanned aircraft.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 6:13 am

A number of federal agencies are grappling with rules around drones as the popularity of the unmanned aircraft is rising. The National Park Service recently banned their use in Yosemite, and the Federal Aviation Administration is under orders from Congress to safely integrate unmanned aircraft into U.S. airspace by September 2015.

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Around the Nation
1:05 pm
Sun May 4, 2014

Amid Statewide Drought, California Races To Burn Wildfire Fuel

California's intense drought has increased the risk of wildfire, and also made it more difficult for fire crews to safely conduct controlled burns.
Tom Dreisbach NPR

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 1:19 pm

On April 30, the Etiwanda Fire ignited in the San Bernardino National Forest in Southern California, then quickly grew to more than 2,000 acres before crews were able to contain it.

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My Big Break
12:13 pm
Sun May 4, 2014

How To Make Your Idol Hate You, In One Unfunny Comedy Audition

Comedian Kurt Braunohler does not speak German, but that didn't stop him from faking his way to an audition for the film Brüno.
Mandee Johnson

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 6:03 am

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers. The following is what you might call an "almost big break."

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