Quentin Hope

Strategic Projects Director

Community: Denver, CO
Profession:  strategy, management and organization consultant

Pages

Making KS redder
8:00 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Brownback asserts a “Kansas Purpose” in NYT interview

Credit Kansas Office of the Governor

Kansas Governor Sam Brownback is quoted as avowedly pursuing “a strategy that builds a strong state in the future on the red state model,” in a recent New York Times article on his administration to date.  According to the article, Brownback has delivered on his promise of a “conservative revolution” but the results and benefits to the state aren’t yet clear. 

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Year-end contribution drive
8:28 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

One day to close the gap …

There’s still time to help meet HPPR’s goal of raising $50,000 in December in order to cover sharp cuts in government support and end this year without a deficit.  Contribute now by clicking the red “SUPPORT HPPR” button above. Or mail your check dated by the 31st to: HPPR, 210 N 7th Street, Garden City, KS, 67846. We’d also be happy to discuss a contribution by phone during business hours at 800-678-7444 or answer an email sent to Deb Oyler, Executive Director, at director@hppr.org or Ben Brandow, Member Services Manager, at bbrandow@hppr.org.  Thank you for your consideration and support.

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Country Music Pioneer
5:15 am
Sat December 21, 2013

Ray Price remembered: reflective interviews and stories

Credit NPR News

Ray Price was a true pioneer of county music – the living link from Hank Williams to the country music of today who bridged Texas honky-tonk and country crooning and introduced the shuffle beat and walking bass line.

NPR produced some fine remembrances of Ray Price this week that are worth a listen.

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Kansas education funding
4:49 am
Wed December 18, 2013

All-day kindergarten funding may be common ground

Parent's tea party in a kindergarten classroom
Credit Quentin Hope

While the Kansas legislature and local school districts may be at odds over school funding, there may be common ground in a proposal to fund full-day kindergarten, according to a story from the Wichita Eagle.  The state now funds only half-days.

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Holiday Programming
7:57 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

HPPR Christmas Programming

Following 33 years of tradition, High Plains Public Radio again offers listeners across the High Plains an entire schedule of wonderful Christmas programing of music, word and memories from across centuries of Christmas traditions.  Click here to see the full rundown of the programs, including links to further information, playlists, printed programs and options to listen anytime on-line.  To download a printable calendar of all the programs, click here.  We at HPPR wish you a Merry Christmas and hope these program offerings add to your enjoyment, reflections and memories.

December contribution drive
7:44 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Going the extra mile with HPPR

US Highway 83, Logan County, Kansas
Quentin Hope

HPPR tries to go the extra mile for you, all year long.  By operating a network of 21 stations HPPR is able to serve you in your community and in your travels across the High Plains region.  There are real costs to power and maintain this network, expenses that are far higher per capita than an urban public radio station reaching millions of people with a single transmitter. 

We hope you’ll take a moment before the end of year to go the extra mile in supporting HPPR and the costs of its service to you and your community.  Just click on the red “SUPPORT HPPR” button above. 

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Language maps (2)
9:01 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

THANKSgiving in the Panhandle and ThanksGIVing in Kansas – speaking of food on the High Plains

Residents of the Texas Panhandle are more likely to use the more southern pronunciation of emphasizing the THANKS in Thanksgiving (light blue shading).

If you live in the Texas Panhandle you’re more likely to be discussing plans for THANKSgiving rather than ThanksGIVing, as you might it Kansas.  There’s commonality in how we speak across the High Plains but also differences.  Click through the slide show above to view some food-related differences in pronunciation and usage across the region. 

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HPPR Holiday Special
6:12 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

A Choral Christmas with Stile Antico - Sunday, Dec 22 at 10 am CT

Stile Antico of London

Celebrate Christmas with the sound of soaring voices. Stile Antico, the award-winning choir from London, pays a visit to St. Paul's Church on Harvard Square for a concert of radiant sacred music for the Christmas season by the most acclaimed composers of the renaissance. Hear the group's luminous blend of voices sing the intricately woven music of Thomas Tallis and William Byrd. Hosted by Cathy Fuller of WGBH.

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Language maps (1)
9:43 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Where we don't speak the same language across the High Plains

Credit Bert Vaux (study data) and Joshua Katz (map)

We think of the High Plains as a region with a common geography, environment and economy.  But there are differences in language and dialect.  In some cases Panhandle Texans talk like other Texans and in others case they speak more like western Kansans.  And in still other cases there are differences once you cross the state line into eastern Colorado.  Browse through the dialect maps below to see some of these distinctions.  

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Study from Texas A&M
7:18 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Expand the beef industry to get more value from the Ogallala?

Credit ed_needs_a_bicycle / flickr commons

With the Ogallala aquifer declining, there’s the inevitable question of how best to use the water remaining.  A recent study from Texas A&M suggests one answer: expand the cattle production and processing industries and rely on bringing in more “imported” grain and the “virtual” water it brings to the region.

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Federal Helium Reserve
5:52 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Amarillo facility avoids the “helium cliff”

Postcard view from the mid-20th century of the Amarillo Helium Plant operated by the US Dept. Of Interior as part of the Federal Helium Reserve.
Credit High Country News

Amarillo’s Federal Helium Reserve got a reprieve Thursday as the Senate unanimously approved a bill extending the reserve, a day after the House approved the measure, also unanimously. Without the legislation, the facility would have been forced to shut down on October 7th under older legislation.  The reserve provides 42% of the country’s helium and 35% of the world’s.

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Drought drives payments
8:50 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

What was your county’s crop insurance payout in 2012?

Credit Quentin Hope

  At $200 per acre, Trego County, KS topped the list of High Plains counties in per acre crop insurance payments in 2012.  Other top counties were Wallace County, KS at $157 per acre and Rawlins County, KS at $127 per acre.  All three are in Northwest Kansas.  At the bottom is the list was Hemphill County, TX in the northeast corner of the Panhandle with just $1 per acre on only 13,400 planted acres.

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Rural-urban gaps persist
8:48 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

The "digital divide" in now about adoption

Credit toastwireless.com

The “digital divide” between urban and rural areas used to be all about access to broadband internet service.  Today it is much more about adoption where access is now available. 

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Americans rank the states
8:12 am
Mon September 2, 2013

The gossip on states

The darkest colored state had the highest number of votes, the whitest colored states had next to none.

Side-by-side Kansas and Colorado were ranked first as having “the worst” and “the most beautiful” scenery in the country, respectively, according to a recent poll by Business Insider.  It is not clear whether eastern Colorado was considered part of Kansas or Colorado by the poll respondents.

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Sand Creek Massacre contoversy
8:00 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Clash of cultures or straight-up massacre?

Detail from The Sand Creek massacre, painted on elk hide by Northern Arapaho artist Eugene Ridgely.

Nearly 150 years later, the Sand Creek Massacre remains a wound that has not yet fully healed.  This is evident in the recent closing of a permanent exhibit at the History Colorado Center in Denver exploring the 1864 massacre as part of its Colorado Stories section.  The closing was prompted by concerns of Cheyenne and Arapaho tribal members over aspects of the exhibit’s interpretation and the lack of prior consultation, according to a complete story in the Denver Post.  A reopening is pending the state and tribes reaching a consensus on the exhibit.

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Study provides scenarios
8:00 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Projecting the future of the Ogallala Aquifer

Aerial view of center pivot irrigation fields

In 1960 just 3 percent of the Ogallala aquifer under Western Kansas had been tapped.  By 2010 it was 30 percent.  By 2060 it will be 69 percent.  And once depleted, it will take 500-1,300 years to completely refill.  These projections are all from a recently issued, comprehensive, four year study from Kansas State University. 

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Drought forecast
8:00 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Drought improvements in August but unlikely in the fall

National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center

The High Plains are continuing to benefit from a stalled weather front along lower sections of the central Plains, which is serving as a focus for continued precipitation.  As a result, the monthly drought outlook map from the Climate Prediction Center (see first slide above) shows improvement across the HPPR coverage area though August.

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Drought coverage
7:00 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Texans picture the drought

Lake Colorado City
Earl Notingham, Texas Parks and Wildlife / flickr

Drought conditions are long familiar to the Texas Panhandle and are now becoming well known to other parts of the state.  The most recent drought report from the Texas Water Development Board shows that 97 percent of the state is now experiencing some level of drought.

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Drought conditions update
8:09 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Good rains or dry as ever?

You may think that we’ve had good rainfall in recent weeks.  Or you might feel it’s been as dry as ever.  Across the High Plains either situation could be the case.  While the latest drought maps shows general improvement across the region, a closer look shows a very hit or miss picture with the percentage of normal precipitation varying widely from locale to locale. 

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Two exhibits on until Sept 1
8:00 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Immigration stories, caricatures and stereotypes at the Stauth Museum

"Welcome to All!" (Puck, April 28, 1880) This cartoon reflects the welcome extended to immigrants of the 1880s and America as a land of refuge. The sign to the left of Uncle Sam reads: "Free education, free land, free speech, free ballot, free lunch."
Artist: J. Keppler Michigan State University Museum, Appel Collection

Two traveling exhibits, one featuring personal stories of Kanas’ immigration history and the other the role of caricature and stereotype in forming American values and attitudes about immigration, are now on exhibit at the Stauth Memorial Museum in Montezuma KS.  As part of the exhibition, a presentation and discussion on “Ethnic Labor and Small Towns on the Rock Island Rail Line” will be led by M.J.

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Plains states do well
6:28 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

Location matters in climbing the income ladder

Credit Jonathan Goforth / flickr commons

The plains states rank well generally for income mobility according to a new study considered to be the most comprehensive yet on the subject.  Based on millions of anonymous income records, the study by leading economists found four primary factors correlated with higher income mobility in an area: a larger and more dispersed local middle class, more two-parent households, better elementary schools and high schools, and more civic engagement, including membership in religious and community groups.

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New novel set in eastern CO
8:00 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

The “unhomesteading” of the plains

A father with Alzheimer’s alone on the farm.  A swindling banker.  The school bully now grown-up as the local drug dealer.  A bleak, fictional town set in eastern Colorado.  The “unhomesteading” of the plains.  These are all elements of Greg Hill’s new novel East of Denver.

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Annual survey of 11 factors
7:07 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

KS ranks 2nd, Texas gains in state highway rankings

Oklahoma State Highway 325 west of Boise City, 1999
Credit Quentin Hope

  Kansas ranks second overall in a comprehensive annual report on state highway performance.  Texas ranked 11th, up from 17th place in 2007.  Oklahoma and Colorado trailed far behind at 38th and 41st, respectively.

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At least the dirt's not blowing
7:17 am
Tue June 25, 2013

A poem for a hot day on the High Plains

Field of tumbleweeds under a sky with stray clouds. Wallace County KS, 2002.
Credit Quentin Hope

Poet Mary Lee Hahn offers a short poem that reflects on tourists eyeing the High Plains from I-70 and defines "a good, soaking rain".

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2:18 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Mixed reviews on no income tax in Texas

Lead in text: 
A growing group of Republicans across the country are working to repeal their states’ income tax, using Texas’ economic success to make their case (e.g., Gov. Sam Brownback of Kansas proclaiming “Look out, Texas. Here comes Kansas.”). In Texas, however, the state’s tax system is not universally beloved as explained in this background article by Aman Batheja of the Texas Tribune that appeared in the Amarillo Globe-News.
When Gov. Bobby Jindal of Louisiana wanted to sell his plan to replace his state's income tax with a higher sales tax, he pointed to Texas as the problem and the solution.Too many Louisiana residents are moving to Texas, because that is where the jobs are, he said.
10:32 am
Mon June 17, 2013

Higher Education Cuts Strain Kansans

Lead in text: 
Leaders in higher education struggle operate within caps and budget cuts, families wrestle with increased tuition, legislators grapple with fiscal accountability, and Governor Brownback signs the cuts into budget.
Kansas universities and colleges are beginning to come to grips with what they are calling "devastating" budget cuts imposed by the state Legislature. Leaders at the University of Kansas, Kansas State University and Wichita State University are warning that the cuts, along with what legislators called a "salary cap," will damage everything from farming programs to the ability to educate doctors to the ability to help Wichita's aerospace industries create new jobs.
2013 study of 34 measures
8:59 am
Thu June 13, 2013

CO bests NE, KS, TX and OK in overall senior health

Credit America's Health Rankings

Colorado ranks 8th, Nebraska 14th, Kansas 18th, Texas 39th and Oklahoma 49th in overall senior health according to the 2013 America’s Health Rankings® Senior Report.  

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8:09 am
Wed June 12, 2013

New technology, unusual alliances and uncertain subsidies drive wind power

Lead in text: 
Advances in technology, along with an unusual alliance of green and red politics, have spurred the growth of wind energy across the plains states. Yet the uncertainty of short-term tax credits has also created cycles of boom and bust that may harm the industry in the long run. The Economist magazine provides a good overview of the current state of play.
ON A breezy day in October last year the governor of Kansas, Sam Brownback, took a tour of his state's flourishing oil- and gas-exploration industry. But as the bus travelled across the open plains it was difficult not to notice a new phenomenon in Kansan energy: wind turbines. Lots of them.
9:46 am
Sat June 8, 2013

Water conservation incentives leading to more water use?

Lead in text: 
The 1996 farm bill authorized an incentive program to help farmers buy more efficient irrigation equipment to save water. An estimated $4.2 billion in conservation subsidy payments have been made since 1997 and the program is under scrutiny in the current debate over a new five-year farm bill. And questions are being raised over whether the water conservation promoted by the program has actually led to more overall water use.
WASHINGTON - Millions of dollars in farm subsidies for irrigation equipment aimed at water conservation have led to more water use, not less, threatening vulnerable aquifers and streams. From Wyoming to the Texas Panhandle, water tables have fallen 150 feet in some areas - ranging from 15 percent to 75 percent - since the 1950s, scientists say, because the subsidies give farmers the incentive to irrigate more acres of land.
Harvest Public Media story
8:01 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

States ponder the "right to farm"

Some farmers are feeling a bit defensive – or put-upon -- these days. Take the recent experiences of Bob Young, for instance.  The 69 year old raises 36-hundred hogs on the land where he grew up near Rochester in central Illinois.  When he was getting ready to build a hog confinement facility seven years ago some area residents, concerned about the potential smell of the place, filed suit.  A court order stopped construction for 18 months.

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