Scott Graf

Scott comes to BSPR from WFAE in Charlotte, N.C., where he served as local host of NPR’s “Morning Edition” for the past eight years. He began his new position as Morning Edition Host/Senior Editor for BSPR in 2012.

Scott is a multi-award winning host and reporter who was named the North Carolina Journalist of the Year in 2007. He has produced several feature stories for NPR news magazines and he contributes to WBUR's “Only a Game” sports program.

Around the Nation
1:24 am
Sat July 6, 2013

With Bullets Scarce, More Shooters Make Their Own

Since the Newtown school shooting in December, gun stores nationwide have had difficulty keeping ammunition, like these .223-caliber rifle bullets, in stock.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 6, 2013 4:05 pm

Gun stores around the country have had difficulty keeping up with demand for ammunition in recent months. Fears of government tightening of gun and ammunition controls have meant that retailers, from Wal-Mart to mom-and-pop gun shops, haven't been able to keep bullets on the shelves.

Cliff Poser's gun shop, Cliff's Guns, Safes and Reloading in Boise, Idaho, is one of them. Business has been so crazy lately that he has to keep a special stash of ammunition, just so customers who buy guns from him can also buy bullets.

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Around the Nation
2:55 am
Sun July 1, 2012

Firefighting Planes Battle Wildfires And Old Age

A firefighting air tanker drops fire retardant on the Tea Fire in Montecito, Calif. in 2008. In 2000, The U.S. Forest Service had contracts for 43 air tankers. These days, that number is only nine.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 1, 2012 7:05 am

As wildfires continue to burn in the West, the U.S. Forest Service is going to battle this summer with fewer air tankers. The number of planes that drop retardant on fires has shrunk significantly over the past 12 years.

In Boise, Idaho, the shortage of air tankers has led to some unexpected repurposing of aircraft.

"This particular aircraft was used as Air Force One at one point," explains pilot Lyle Ehalt, standing next to his shiny white-and-green tanker at the Boise Airport.

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