Briefly: Texas water, Texas Confidential, Texas solar energy, guns and booze

Aug 11, 2014

Credit Michael Glasgow/Texas Tribune

In Panhandle, a Growing Need for a Shallow Lake's Water
Lake Meredith, previously empty, is only 4% full, but those 2.8 billion gallons are enough for the Canadian River Municipal Water Authority to start pumping water from the lake. The authority supplies water to Amarillo, Lubbock, and surrounding areas. The low water means higher sediment levels, which will affect the water's taste and cause higher treatment costs. More from the Amarillo Globe-News.

Make (and Possibly Read) a 'Texas Confessional'
It's an art project involving the collection of confessions, contributed anonymously by Texans… and a mere 100 printed books containing these anonymous regrets distributed across the state for unwitting readers to stumble upon. KUT Austin looks into it.

Testing renewable energy gains steam at WT institute
This West Texas A&M facility has been testing wind turbines for safety and durability under a contract by Underwriting Laboratories. Now, the facility is testing solar power systems. Amarillo Globe-News has more.

Proposed Rules Would Allow Alcohol at Gun Shows
The headline may sound titillating, but the circumstances covered under this proposal by the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission are limited. The commission is accepting public comments about a proposed change which would allow venues it licenses which are owned by or leased by a government agency or nonprofit organization and which only show guns "occasionally," to allow alcohol sales and consumption so long as all guns are disabled and with no live ammunition on the premises, and with no delivery to buyers on site. Texas Tribune has more of this.

Nearly All Texas School Districts Meet State Ratings
9 out of 10 school districts in Texas met standards under the state's new accountability rating system. Schools can earn overall ratings of "met standard" or "needs improvement" under the system which judges performance on student achievement, student progress, post-secondary readiness, and closing performance gaps between low-achieving demographics. But critics say the two-category system is overly broad. Read more from Texas Tribune.