Two eastern Colorado historic sites see upticks in visitors in 2016

Mar 19, 2017

Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site, Chivington, Colorado.
Credit http://www.sandcreeksite.com/

The Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site and Bent’s Old Fort – both in southeastern Colorado – saw an uptick in visitors in 2016.

As The Prowers Journal reports, the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Chivington, Colorado - the site of the 1864 attack by U.S. volunteer soldiers on a village of Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians that left 230 mostly women, children and elderly dead - hosted almost 1,000 more visitors in 2016 than in 2015.

Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site, La Junta, Colorado.
Credit www.colorado.com

The Prowers Journal also reports that Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site in La Junta, Colorado, which was built for trade with Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians in the 1880s, also saw an uptick in visitors last year as almost 32,000 people visited the site, representing a 22 percent increase over 2015.

Michael T. Reynolds, acting national park service director, said while he expected higher visitations to the sites in 2016 because of the National Park Service’s centennial anniversary, he didn’t expect it to increase that much and said it shows the “depth of feeling people have for their national parks.”

Visit Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site for more information.

Click here for more information about Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site.