All Things Considered on HPPR

Weekdays from 4:00 to 7:00 pm CT; weekends from 4:00 to 5:00 pm CT

All Things Considered: Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio news magazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand the world. HPPR adds a High Plains perspective with regional weather and community events.

http://www.npr.org/programs/all-things-considered/

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Science
11:36 am
Sun July 28, 2013

'Batman' Style: How We Can See With Sound, Too

Echolocation is second nature to animals such as bats and dolphins. Can humans also find their way using sound as a tool?
Ian Waldie Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 6:30 am

Birds do it. Bats do it. Now even educated people do it. Echolocation is the process used by certain animals to identify what lies ahead of them, by emitting sounds that bounce off objects.

Now a team of researchers has created an algorithm that could give the rest of us a chance to see with sound.

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Science
11:34 am
Sun July 28, 2013

The Rise Of Bloodsucking Insects You Can't Just Swat Away

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 1:24 pm

Steamy days, sultry nights and swarming bugs all make up the thrum of life in the heart of summer. But more and more, our summers are assaulted by the bloodsucking kind of bugs, namely mosquitoes and ticks.

More than a nuisance, new species can impact our health and indicate larger environmental trends.

Beautiful And Adaptable

One relative newcomer prowling the scene is the Asian tiger mosquito. Named for its unique markings, it is black with white stripes.

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U.S.
12:25 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

How Americans Said No To Cocaine After Years-Long Addiction

Narcotics officers in New York seized 3,586 pounds of cocaine and $1.3 million seized in 1997. Cocaine use in the U.S. has dropped by almost half since 2006.
Gino Dominico AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:56 am

In the 1980s, if you moved in certain circles — or picked up the newspaper — a certain white powder was everywhere, common as dust.

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A Blog Supreme
12:25 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

Piano Mastery, Trinidadian Trumpet, Singing Apes: New Jazz

Trumpeter Etienne Charles' new album is called Creole Soul.
Laura Ferreira Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:26 am

It's been too long since we simply sat up and pointed out a few of the many new releases worth a set of ears. Luckily, the staff on weekends at All Things Considered thought the same. They invited me to sit down with host Jacki Lyden and play a few cuts for them.

Here's music from an elder statesman of piano, a trumpeter who understands creole music personally, a drummer who writes tunes with a payoff, and a singer in her early 20s with maturity and kick.

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Author Interviews
12:25 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

In 'The Panopticon,' They're Always Watching

During the 19th century, a panopticon was a prison or asylum with an all-seeing eye. Some of the C-shaped prisons with central watchtowers still stand in the U.S. and Europe.

Jenni Fagan's new book borrows the panopticon idea as the setting for a gritty, often poetic, novel. The story is based loosely on Fagan's own experience growing up in the Scottish foster care system for 16 years.

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NPR Story
11:54 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Handful Of Tracks Propelled J.J. Cale To Big Leagues

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 12:25 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

And as we mentioned earlier in the show, singer-songwriter J.J. Cale has died. If you're not familiar with his name, you've probably heard some of his music. He penned hits from the 1970s and '80s that were recorded by Eric Clapton, Lynyrd Skynyrd and many others. The success of those songs gave him the freedom to release his own albums for more than four decades. NPR's Dan Bobkoff has this remembrance.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CALL ME THE BREEZE")

LYNYRD SKYNYRD: One, two, one, two...

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NPR Story
11:54 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Film Unveils Underpinnings Of Mass Killings In Indonesia

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 12:25 pm

The film The Act of Killing is the most talked about movie of the year. It's a film that is both fiction and nonfiction. Filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer talked to the old men in charge of the death squads in Indonesia in the 1960s that killed somewhere between 500,000 to 2 million civilians in the name of thwarting communism.

NPR Story
11:54 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Diseases That Never Went Away: Battling Drug Resistance

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 12:25 pm

Why are these antiquated diseases on the rise again, and how strong is the threat of drug-resistant bacteria? Host Jacki Lyden talks to Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, Ga., about this trend in infectious diseases.

Found Recipes
12:57 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

And The Winning Taste Of Summer Is ...

Some NPR staff members taste recipes from the contest finalists.
Matt Martinez NPR

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:01 am

The voting is finished. The taste test is done. The verdict is in: Marti Olesen has won All Things Considered's Taste of Summer contest with her recipe for Diane's Dad's Summer Sandwich.

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NPR Story
11:55 am
Fri July 26, 2013

The Yankees Want Him Out But Alex Rodriguez Wants To Stay

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:01 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. One criticism of baseball is that it's too prone to long stretches of inaction, players sitting around not doing much. Well, if that's what baseball is, then Alex Rodriguez of the New York Yankees has been Mr. Baseball this season. He's been on the disabled list, but he claims he's healthy enough to play. His team begs to differ. Here to talk about the confusion is NPR's Mike Pesca, who joins us from New York. Hi, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

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NPR Story
11:55 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Fight Brews Over Who Will Pay To Clean Up Quebec Train Crash

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:01 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Three weeks after a deadly train crash in eastern Canada, officials have yet to file any charges. Forty-seven people were killed when an unmanned tanker train full of oil derailed and exploded in the heart of a small town. Now, investigators are trying to figure out who or what is to blame. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann has the story.

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NPR Story
11:55 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Church Invested In Pay Day Loan Companies It Admonished

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:01 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. The Church of England's top bishop is in a little hot water. The archbishop of Canterbury is embroiled in a controversy about ethical investment. As NPR's Philip Reeves reports, it involves a company called Wonga.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Let us greet our newly installed archbishop with great gladness.

(APPLAUSE)

PHILIP REEVES, BYLINE: Four months have elapsed since Justin Welby was enthroned as the 105th archbishop of Canterbury.

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Monkey See
10:24 am
Fri July 26, 2013

'Snacks On A Plane' And Other #dullermovies

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:01 am

Boring movie titles may not lure audiences into theaters, but they are luring users on Twitter. The #dullermovies thread challenges tweeters to pick an enticing film title and deflate it. People have come up with must-not-see films such as Ferris Bueller Goes to School and I Speculate On What You Did Last Summer. A couple of our favorites are collected below.

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Sports
10:16 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Age Hasn't Stopped This Man From Swimming — And Winning

Graham Johnston, 82, poses for a portrait through an underwater window at the pool on Wednesday. Graham competed at the Senior Games in Cleveland, where more than 10,000 athletes older than 55 are competing in various sports.
Benjamin Morris for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:01 am

More than 10,000 athletes are meeting in Cleveland for The National Senior Games. Adults older than 55 — and some older than 90 — are running track, riding bikes, playing basketball and competing in many of the sports you might see at the Summer Olympics. In fact there are a few who were Olympians themselves back in the day who say they find that competition is just as satisfying in their later years.

One of those is 82-year-old swimmer Graham Johnston. When he's not racing or getting ready to race, he's in the stands, checking out the other swimmers with an expert eye.

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Planet Money
7:49 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Stamps, Jeans, Beer: What Americans Want From North Korea

Can I buy a pair of jeans made in North Korea?
Office of Foreign Assets Control

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:01 am

U.S. sanctions mean that any citizen or business wanting to buy stuff from North Korea has to send a letter to the U.S. government asking for special permission. A few months back, we submitted a Freedom of Information Act request, asking for those letters.

Our request was granted: We recently received a packet of 18 letters from Americans who wanted to do business with the most isolated nation on the planet. We've posted all of the letters online.

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Movie Interviews
12:50 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

'In A World ...' Is A Comedy About, You Guessed It, Voice-Over Artists

Lake Bell was born Lake Siegel Bell. Her father is named Harvey Siegel, but she says her mother got the last name in the divorce settlement.
Seamus Tierney

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Business
12:25 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

U.S. Carmakers Are Riding High, But Detroit May Not Feel It

Jeff Caldwell, a chassis assembly line supervisor, checks a vehicle on the assembly line at the Chrysler Jefferson North Assembly plant in Detroit on May 8.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:19 pm

The news out of Detroit has been grim of late, but there are some bright spots coming from one corner of the Motor City. On Thursday, General Motors posted its 14th straight profitable quarter since emerging from bankruptcy. Ford announced its 16th consecutive profitable quarter Wednesday, and Chrysler is expected to offer good news soon as well.

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Science
12:12 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

If You Want A Doughnut Hole, Don't Ask A Mathematician

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 6:27 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

A program such as ours is timed to the exact second, and occasionally, there are small holes when our mix of news and features doesn't quite fill up our two-hour slot.

So NPR's Joe Palca offered to come to our rescue with some short math and sciencey hole-filling stories, stories about what else - holes.

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Around the Nation
12:12 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

N.C. Tries To Make Amends For Forced Sterilizations

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:43 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

In the early 1900s, more than half of the states in the U.S. passed laws allowing people to be sterilized against their will. North Carolina's eugenics program was particularly aggressive. Some 7,600 men, women and children were sterilized often because they were poor or mentally ill.

Now, North Carolina has done more than any other state to make amends, as we hear from Julie Rose of member station WFAE.

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The Salt
11:05 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Catch Of The Day, Grilled The Turkish Way

Anglers fish off Galata Bridge in Istanbul in 2011. The bridge is within site of the modest waterside restaurant Akin Balik.
Bulent Kilic AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:17 pm

Each morning as dawn breaks over the Bosphorus Strait in Turkey, a small drama repeats itself: Massive oil tankers and cargo ships slide past tiny fishing boats bobbing on the surface like bathtub toys.

These intrepid fishermen are out in all weather, in all seasons. In the winter, they catch the rich, oily anchovies, bluefish and mackerel. With spring come the turbot and sea bream, and by summer, sea bass and red mullet are being hawked by the fishmongers.

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Europe
2:21 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Royals Reveal New Baby's Name

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Finally this hour, the news that some of you at least have been anxiously awaiting. The royal baby has a name, several of them, in fact. George Alexander Louis. We'll break down that monitor for you now.

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National Security
2:03 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

House Rejects Measure That Would Have Curbed NSA Program

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:58 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

On Capitol Hill, an effort to limit the authority of the National Security Agency has fallen short. It was the first chance for House lawmakers to vote on the government's phone surveillance program since news of it was leaked by Edward Snowden. They rejected an amendment that the White House and top intelligence officials had lobbied hard against.

NPR's Tamara Keith joins us from Capitol Hill. And, Tamara, the amendment was defeated. How close was it?

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Environment
12:52 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

What's Swimming In The River? Just Look For DNA

Biologists normally look for the hellbender slamander, which is known by the nickname "snot otter," under rocks in streams. But now there's a gentler way: They can take water samples and look for traces of the animals' DNA.
Robert J. Erwin Science Source

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:34 pm

If you want to protect rare species, first you have to find them. In the past few years, biologists have developed a powerful new tool to do that. They've discovered that they can often find traces of animal DNA in streams, ponds — even oceans.

The idea took root just five years ago, when biologists in France found they could detect invasive American bullfrogs simply by sampling pond water and looking for an exact genetic match to the frogs' DNA.

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Business
12:29 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Full-Time Vs. Part-Time Workers: Restaurants Weigh Obamacare

The California Tortilla chain is one company still deciding how to react to the new health care requirements for business, set to take effect next year.
John Ydstie NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:21 pm

Many businesses that don't offer health insurance to all their employees breathed a sigh of relief earlier this month when they learned they'd have an extra year to comply with the new health care law or face stiff penalties.

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Code Switch
12:29 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How Musicians Helped Integrate The Silver Screen

When Gene Krupa's orchestra was cast in 1941's Ball of Fire, trumpeter Roy Eldridge's presence was not negotiable.
Express Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:28 am

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Education
11:45 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Senate Passes Student Loan Legislation To Lower Interest Rates

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:31 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

After a long wait, the Senate has finally passed student loan legislation. It would restore lower interest rates for undergraduates. Many of them saw their rates double on July 1st when the Senate missed its deadline.

As NPR's Ailsa Chang reports, the new measure closely resembles both what the president wanted and what the House has already passed.

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Around the Nation
11:45 am
Wed July 24, 2013

'Bat Cave' Road In Chicago Accessible To Only A Few

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

In Chicago, there's a two-and-a-half-mile roadway that the mayor calls the Bat Cave. It's been around for more than a decade, but it's not well known. The mini-highway was designed to ferry conventioneers to Chicago's convention hall.

But as NPR's Cheryl Corley reports, some local politicians are arguing that the Bat Cave is being reserved for politicians with special clout.

(SOUNDBITE OF VEHICLES)

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Energy
11:45 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Offshore Drilling Rig Remains On Fire In Gulf Of Mexico

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

An offshore drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico is on fire. Regulators say the rig has partially collapsed. It all began yesterday when members of a drilling crew lost control of a natural gas well they were completing. The crew was evacuated from the rig as a cloud of gas escaped into the air. And then last night, the gas caught fire. NPR's Jeff Brady tells us more.

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Around the Nation
1:19 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Weiner Says He Won't Drop Campaign For NYC Mayor

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block. Disgraced former congressman - and current New York City mayoral candidate - Anthony Weiner is apologizing again, this time after the publication of still more lewd messages and photos that Weiner exchanged online with a woman who is not his wife.

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Monkey See
1:16 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

90 Years Later, 'Safety' Still The Last Word With Harold Lloyd

Harold Lloyd (left) is the All-American Boy, a striver who'll brave nearly anything to get to the top and win The Girl. Noah Young is The Law (center) and Bill Strother is The Pal.
Criterion Collection

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 2:16 pm

There may be no film image more iconic: Harold Lloyd, high above the street, dangling from the minute hand of a giant department-store clock.

The face of the clock swings down; the minute hand bends. It's been 90 years since the silent era's greatest daredevil shot that sequence, and it still has the power to prompt shrieks and laughter.

Lloyd's character was the All-American Boy, innocent in his horn-rimmed glasses, eager to climb the ladder of success — and like many a social striver before him, he was plagued by anxiety that he'd fall before he got to the top.

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