Growing on the High Plains

Airs Thursdays at 10:30 am CT and Saturdays at 8:35 am CT

Years ago Skip Mancini left the rocky coast of Northern California to return to her roots in the heartland. Her San Francisco friends, concerned over her decision to live in a desolate flatland best known for a Hollywood tornado, were afraid she would wither and die on the vine. With pioneer spirit Skip planted a garden, and began to learn about growing not only flowers and vegetables, but hearts and minds. If you agree that the prairie is a special place, we think you'll enjoy her weekly sojourns into Growing on the High Plains. 

Contact Skip Mancini about the program. 

Pages

Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed December 11, 2013

Santa Claus Melons

Melons are most often thought of as summertime treats, and many High Plains gardens offer them up during the hottest part of the growing season.  But our subject today is a melon type that produces in the heat but has the staying power to become a  prized centerpiece for holiday tables.  Santa Claus or Christmas melons have a few things going for them that set them apart from regular cantaloupes or honeydews, and that's the reason they can last so long off the vine.
Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Thanksgiving Tomatoes

Credit eatathomewi.com

After a series of late freezes wiped out a good deal of my garden I accepted the hard truth that I would have to buy vegetables and fruits that were not usually on my shopping list.   But around mid-summer I discovered that a favorite fruit that had been getting harder and harder to produce had decided to literally burst upon the scene and give me a late summer season of the best tomatoes I'd produced in years.  So this year I'm giving thanks for The Return of the Ripe Tomato!

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

A World Without Bees

Almond trees rely on bees to pollinate during their brief bloom for a few weeks in February.
Credit Winfried Rothermel / APN

You don't have to look the world over for evidence that honeybees are in trouble. A global disaster is in the making, and it's evident right in our backyards. Today Growing on the High Plains looks at the worries of beekeepers in Western Kansas, and the things we'll lose from our table when we lose the honeybees. Get ready to say so long to a myriad of fruits, nuts, and vegetables that depend on the honeybee for pollination.

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Buzzing It From The Rooftops

Credit circajewels.com

Look!  Up in the sky!  It's a Bird....it's a plane....no, it's a honeybee just taking off from the roof of a high rise hotel!  During a trip to the New York City area we were headquartered at a hotel that provided spectacular views of the city skyline and an up close and personal look at some in-house methods of bringing nature indoors.  From a lobby lined with herbs planted into the walls to a rooftop that was home to thousands of honeybees who daily worked the surrounding New Jersey farmlands, this Regency hotel is doing its best to be a good neighbor to it's guests, the surrounding community, and the environment.

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Planting Pollinators

Credit wikipedia.org

As wildlife habitats continue to disappear at an alarming rate, it's important  to remember that these areas are critical to the survival of not only animals of the woodlands and prairies but also the insects that are essential to the creation of many of our food sources. Production of countless fruits and vegetables depends on visits from a variety of flying insects that search out pollinators in your yard and garden. 

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Tom Gillan: Gardening on the Side

Tom Gillan, left and Skip Mancini, right
Credit Cindee Talley

Conversation with Tom Gillan

 Tom Gillan is the owner of Native Nursery.  He's also in the midst of writing a book titled Gardening on the Side.  It's not about gardening as a hobby, it's about planning and planting specific to the side of the building.

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed October 23, 2013

Xeriscaping: Planting blooms and color that last spring through fall

Skip Mancini (L) and Tom Gillan (R)
Credit Cindee Talley

Skip sits down with Tom Gillan, Owner, Native Nursery

  The xeriscaping conversation continues with Tom Gillan, owner of Native Nursery.  Today, the discussion focuses on planning a landscape that gives color and texture from spring until fall.

Growing on the High Plains Episode
6:50 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Garden Party Joke Show

Credit healthmeup.com

Join Skip and a cast of friends for an old fashioned joke show.  Blake Burnside,  Randy McVey, Ellen Mangan, David Miller, and  Stacy Regan-Green yuck it up in this laughing good time.

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Zoo Landscaping

Skip and Tom Gillian looking over the landscaping
Cindee Talley

Skip has a special guest in today.  Tom Gillan dropped by to talk about the differences between landscaping in public areas versus a home.  Tom is the owner of Native Nursery in Golden, Colorado.  He also talked about his current project:  Cat Canyon at the Lee Richardson Zoo in Garden City, Kansas.    

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Fall Tree Planting

Credit whatsgrowingonfrostnursery.com

As our weather moves toward the cool and crispy days of autumn, it heralds changes to the gardening routine.  As gardens and lawns slow down and give you a bit more time, don't forget that this is the best time to add trees and shrubs to your landscape. Today GHP covers some basics of fall planting, to get your tree or shrub off to a good start. 
Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Dyck Arboretum: Native Plant Sale

Credit mywedding.com

Skip talks on the phone with Dyck Arboretum Executive Director, Scott Vogt.

This week a special event is taking place at the Dyck Arboretum in Hesston, Kansas.  FloraKansas is the largest native plant sale in the state, and will take place Thursday, September 5 through Sunday, September 8.  This event has been going on for 14 years, and its popularity is growing almost as rapidly as the numbers of native perennials, wildflowers and grasses that will be offered for sale.  More information about the location, hours and available plants can be found by calling 620-327-8127, or going online to www.dyckarboretum.org.  A visit to this special place is always a joy, and the plant sale this weekend makes it even more fun and informative.

Growing on the High Plains Episode
4:52 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Tomato Diseases

Credit blogs.cornell.edu

 A look back at my past gardening challenges brings up the myriad of difficulties one faces when trying to grow tomatoes.  These most popular fruits of our gardening labors require consistent record keeping, as you don't ever want to plant them in the same space within a three year period.  Tomatoes can suffer from a wide variety of soil-borne and airborne illnesses, as well as being the target of a horde of insects that can eat or infect the foliage of your prize plants.  After years of fighting against blight, viruses, unpredictable weather patterns, and beastly bugs, I've decided that perhaps the best solution to my tomato problems is found in the adage about 'safety in numbers'.   

Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

Lawn Lamentations

Credit jeinc.com

Although buffalo grass is still my lawn of choice for the dry and windy area we call the Southern High Plains, this summer it has been hard pressed to bounce back from our third year of ongoing drought and high temperatures.  As our area of the world seems to be turning more desert-like, even this native of the short grass prairie will need occasional water and maybe a shot of nutrients to do its best.  But it still offers the best alternative when planning a lawn that can stand up to all the challenges our climate has to offer.
Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:00 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Little Blue Stem

Credit nativesoftexas.com

In a continuing investigation of landscape plans utilizing grass gardens, this week we'll look at Little Bluestem.  This hardy 'bunch' or 'clump' grass is of a more manageable size than it's bigger relative, the Big Bluestem of the tall grass prairies.  Little Bluestem can serve as an eye-catching accent plant, or as a seasonal backdrop for wildflowers or other blooming plants.  And in its native habitat it provides forage for grazing animals and shelter for various birds and wildlife.

Growing on the High Plains Episode
9:31 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Grass Gardens

Credit penick.net

This week's show introduces elements of a landscape plan that promises to be more efficient and effective in an environment that seems to be moving toward the hotter and drier side of gardening.  Ornamental grasses can offer a rich variety of size, texture and color to a planted area or in a series of containers.  And they can provide visual interest almost year round, as many grass gardens can show off fall colors and wintertime backdrops when other plants have been put to rest.

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
6:31 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Gardening Exercise

Credit athletico.com

Gardening season can offer a great alternative to going to the gym in order to find physical fitness.  Various activities like pushing a lawnmower, digging a new flower bed, or transplanting perennials can all add up to feeling and looking better through at least three seasons of the year.  If you are working on weight loss, in addition to counting calories, try counting metabolic equivalents or METs,  to meet your goals.

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
9:00 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

Busy Bee Farms Part Three: A legacy for the future

Ready to leave the greenhouse.
Credit Skip Mancini

Our final trip to Busy Bee Farms includes some advice from the experts on how to choose and use a great tasting tomato.  Differences between tomatoes that are shipped long distances and the greenhouse or homegrown varieties are explored, as well as tips on storing colorful heirloom tomatoes.  Susan also sums up the family's belief in the true rewards of hard work.     

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:01 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Busy Bee Farms: Part Two

Our second visit to Busy Bee Farms in Kismet Kansas takes us for a tour of internal workings of the greenhouses that produce literal layers of tomatoes,  as well as lettuce, cucumbers and other vegetables. Pond plants and koi fish provide some tropical looking landscapes on our walk-through.  We'll also get the buzz on the insect population that helps pollinate and protect the produce and plants.

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:01 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Busy Bee Farms: Part One

Busy Bee Farmers Dannie and Suzan

Today we'll start a special three part series that began as a stop-over at Busy Bee Farms in Southwest Kansas.  I found out about this great place when I bought a little container of delicious tomatoes that sported the Busy Bee logo and implored me to 'buy local'. 

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:01 pm
Wed June 19, 2013

If Color had a Taste, Green would be English Peas

English peas are a challenge for High Plains gardeners.  To increase your chances to taste the color green from the garden, I've discovered these keys:

  • Plant early
  • Stake against the wind
  • Water continuously
  • Check often because they go from tender orbs to hard marbles almost instantly
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:01 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Prairie Invaders

A trip to the Red Hills southwest of Medicine Lodge, Kansas, can be an eye opener for both beautiful countryside and an invading horde of Eastern Red Cedars -- a good tree gone bad.  Red cedars have been a part of the history of the Great Plains from Texas to Canada, and were once controlled from over-population by natural wildfires.  But with the advent of civilization, fires have been controlled to the point that the tree is taking over grazing lands and disastrous results are being reported.  Reduced cattle forage, numbers of grassland birds (especially the prairie chicken), lesser numbers of other wildlife, and decreased stands of  wildflowers are a result of the forestation of the prairie.  One of the most serious side effects is the drain on water supplied from natural aquifers and annual rainfall.

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:01 pm
Wed May 29, 2013

Patchouli Rescue Stirs Memories

Skip rescues a parking lot plant and then reminisces about past experiences centered around the scent of patchouli.  The aromatic herb has a rich history, beginning with ancient civilizations who used it for medicinal purposes, or as a practical packing for the transport of treasured fabrics from the Orient.  Its moth-repellent properties gave a heavy, spicy odor to the silks and brocades that signaled the wearer was from the wealthier classes.  It soon became an important ingredient in perfumes, oils and lotions for the upper classes.  A look at a modern use of patchouli leads us through

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:01 pm
Wed May 22, 2013

Peonies

Peony blossoms are one of the favorite offerings at memorial gardens and cemeteries, as well as a popular declaration that spring has sprung and summer is getting into gear.  They take a bit of planning and effort when planting, but with proper precautions and care they can most likely be a part of your memorial day garden for the next fifty years!  If you want to add them to your landscaping layout, plan for a fall planting or division from existing plants, when reddish buds appear at the base of the plant.  Depth is a major issue when planting peonies, as a shallow planting may mean free

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:01 pm
Wed May 15, 2013

Windbreak, Part II

Credit NRD

In addition to the role windbreaks play in decreasing soil erosion, these valuable elements of modern day agriculture can increase crop yields, act as environmental buffers, improve air quality, and provide valuable pollinator habitat for bees and other beneficial insects.  Windbreaks can be multifunctional, providing not only protection from the wind, dust and snow, but serving as economic stimulators through the marketing of tree products.  To learn more about the importance of windbreaks and the design basics needed to develop a functioning shelterbelts, take part in the Southern Plains Windbreak Renovation and Innovation Workshop to be held in Dodge City, Kansas May 21 - 23, 2013.  Call the K-State Extension office in Ford County 620-227-4542, or contact Andrea Burns at: aburns@ksu.edu.

Growing on the High Plains Episode
12:15 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Windbreak Workshops, Part I

Credit USDA NRCS

During the 'Dirty Thirties' various methods of controlling soil erosion were tried to help end the blowing dust and keep precious topsoil in place.  In addition to different ways of tilling the soil, and the establishment of grasslands to hold the soil, thousands of tree rows, called shelterbelts or windbreaks, were planted to decrease wind erosion and to provide shelter for homesteads and livestock.   With the advent of large scale irrigation, and especially center pivot irrigation systems, plus the fact that the numbers of occupied farmsteads has decreased, we also see a decrease in windbreaks.   Today the Great Plains states are again facing critical droughts and blowing dust.  Many of the old windbreaks are dying of age, disease, and insects.  It is once again time to transplant tree seedlings and rebuild windbreaks.  A three day series of workshops presented by various forestry agencies, assisted by numerous state extension offices will be held May 21 - 23 in Dodge City, Kansas.  For more information about these meetings, contact Andrea Burns at the Kansas State Extension Office in Ford County.  Email aburns@ksu.edu or call 620-227-4542.  You can also get additional information on the following website:  http://nac.unl.edu/events/southernplainsworkshop.htm

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:01 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

A Winter's Gift

The lines drawn this year between winter and spring have been hazy at best.  Days of warm weather in March and April are typical, usually followed by some frosty days and occasional hard freezes.  But, this year took the cake and a few records, as the swing between winter and spring began to resemble a yo-yo championship.  Warm days invited gardeners outdoors just in time to get slapped in the face by cold rains that quickly turned to sleet, ice, and snowfall that was record breaking in many areas, and this weather pattern repeated itself not once but several times.  Some High plains communities were snowbound while others saw blowing dust and hard freezes that wiped out future fruit harvests and wheat crops.  But, into this made mix a little hope must fall, and it did this year, in my yard with the arrival of the Eastern pasque flower, also known by its old-timey name of Anemone Patens.

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:01 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Up From the Roots

Today, I'm thinking about how the plants, in my garden, are similar to public radio on the prairie.  Some of my plants come from seeds, some are off-shoots of parents plants, some started as cuttings or grafts relocated from other gardens and plants.  Some are divisions, where I have dug up the parent plant, divided it, and then planted the "kids" in a new spot.  

Read more
Growing on the High Plains Episode
7:43 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Money Grows... in the Garden

Money Plant, or Lunaria is known for its silvery, white seed pods that resemble coins of the realm. It is a biennial.  Clusters of lavender flowers bloom in the spring, and the flat seed pods form the second summer.  The coin-shaped pods are beautiful in dried arrangements. 
To dry the pods, simply cut when they are fully developed, gather them into a bunch, and hang upside down in a place where the air circulates well until they are completely dry, usually two to three weeks.  The brown husks on the sides of the seed pods can be removed by gently rubbing the pod between your thumb and finger. 

Growing on the High Plains Episode
8:01 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

Flowering Quince

Suffering from a bout of spring fever, Skip succumbed to the purchase of a plant that produced beautiful blossoms even before planting time.  However, balmy spring weather was quickly replaced by a spring snowstorm, forcing the shower of flowers indoors.  There it still brightened the corner where it was with scarlet colors and a promise of a garden show to come.

Growing on the High Plains Episode
12:48 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Lavender

This week we'll look at one of the oldest and most loved plants in the herb garden.  The numerous types of lavender are often named for their country of origin, with Spanish, French, and English lavenders among the top competitors in any popularity contest.  Originally used for medicinal purposes, it is now listed as the top aromatic herb around the globe.

Pages